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STATISTICAL ISSUE 

WINTER, 1962 



NnCi 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 




CALIFORNIA STATE 
LIBRARY STAFF 

■ Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, 

State Librarian 

■ Rlrs. Phyllis I. Dalton, 

Assistant State Librarian 
m Arlene Hope, Principal Libra- 
rian, Library Consultant 
Services 

■ Florence E. Billet, 

Library Consultant 

■ Shirley Brother, 

Library Consultant 

■ M. Virginia Hughes, 

Library Consultant 

■ Margaret J. Ward, 

Library Consultant 

■ Barbara L. Wynn, 

Library Consultant 

■ Carleton W. Kenyon, 

Law Librarian 

■ Constance E. Lee, Principal 

Librarian, Picader Services 
u Mrs. Mabel Chorley, 

Circulation Section 
m Richard H. Dillon, 

Sutro Library 

■ Allan R. Ottley, 

California Section 

B Eugene L. Pike, 

Reference Section 

m Mary E. Schell, Government 
Publications Section 

■ Mrs. Virginia S. Simpson, 

Books for the Blind 
Section 

■ Melvin C. Oathout, Principal 

Librarian, Technical Services 

■ Alexander T. Birrell, 

Catalog Section 
m Mrs. Elisabeth Bruno, 
Union Catalog Unit 

■ Mrs. Hildur E. Howe, 

Processing Center 

■ Edith A. Irwin, 

Periodicals Section 
m Marvin W. Mounce, 
Processing Center 

■ Margaret E. Preston, 

Order Section 
D Mrs. Avis Smith, 

Book Repair Section 
u Harlo Whipple, Property 

and Shipping Section 

EDITOR: Mrs. Natalie D. Smith 

California State Library, 
P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento 9 
Issued quarterly in the interest of 
the libraries of the State by the 
California State Library. 
Entered as second-class matter 
December 1913, at the post office 
at Sacramento, California, under 
the act of August 24, 1912. 
Accepted for mailing at the spe- 
cial rate of postage provided for 
in Section 1103, Act of October 
3, 1917, auth . August 27, 1918. 

Note: Abstracted in LIBRARY 
SCIENCE ABSTRACTS 





Cdlirornia 




Vol. 57, No. 1, Winter, 1962 
Statistics and Directory Issue 



CONTENTS 

Page 

California State Library Report 2 

California Libraries Annual Statistics 11 

California State Library Salary Ranges 73 

Index to County and Municipal Salary Tables 74 

California Public Library Salaries 76 

California Libraries Annual Statistics, continued ... 93 

California Board of Library Examiners 105 

Directory of California Libraries by City 109 

Index to County Libraries, Branches and Stations 223 

Index to Names of Libraries 231 

Directory of California Public Libraries 242 



inled 



LIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 



NEWS NOTES OF 
CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



I 
I 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY REPORT 1960-61 
ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 

July 1, 1960-June30, 1961 

Materials added to collection 

Books and bound periodicals — volumes added 14,053* 

Magazines — new titles (includes blind material) 128 

Newspapers — new titles 4 

Government publications 43,803 

Maps 1,506 

Books for the Blind 3,105t 

Prints 2 

Art reproductions 69 

Films and filmstrips — titles 10 

Microfilms — reels 1,802 

Union Catalog — New titles and editions 16,528 

Use of materials 

Circulation of all materials except Books for the Blind 167,677 

Circulation of materials for blind borrowers ^ 124,920 

Reference and reading aid transactions 140,247$ 

Bibliographies compiled and revised 220 

Shipments dispatched 147,607 

Photocopies made 4,449 

Photographs made 816 

Consultant services 

Libraries visited by Library Consultant staff 95 

Total Library Consultant visits ; 146 

Visits of librarians, officials, and others to Library Consultant Services 60 

Law Library 

Law libraries visited by Law Librarian 16 

Total Resources, July 1, 1961 

Books and bound periodicals 633,556§ 

Magazines — current subscriptions (includes blind materials) 2,40411 

Newspapers — current subscriptions 162 

Government publications 1,769,895 

Maps 36,653 

Books for the Blind 54,96411 

Prints 5,142 

Art reproductions 1,757 

Film and filmstrips — titles 114 

Microfilms — reels 15,643 

* Includes all collections except Books for the Blind and government publications. 

t Except for a very small percentage, these books and "talking books" remain the property of the Library of 

Congress and are merely deposited in the State Library for service to California and Nevada. 
t A more accurate method of counting reference and reading aid transactions was adopted during this fiscal 

year. As a result of tliis, the real increase in this figure over 1959/60 is greater than is revealed by 

a comparison of the figures for the two fiscal years. 
§ Includes all collections except government publications and Books for the Blind. 
II Smaller number reported than in 1959/60 because of weeding of blind collection magazines. 
11 Total resources of the Books for the Blind collection are smaller in 1960/61 than 1959/60 as the result 

of an active weeding program. 



(2) 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 3 

READER SERVICES 

During fiscal year 1960-61 a number of programs were aecomplislied 
or initiated : 

(1) A management survey was made of the Reader Services Bureau 
by Miss Jewel Hardkopf, management analyst. Major emphasis 
in this study was placed on interlibrary loan service and per- 
sonnel utilization. Many of the recommendations made have been 
implemented, and others will be in the future. 

(2) One program resulting from these recommendations was a series 
of three Interlibrary Loan Workshops, held throughout the 
State with staff from public libraries which use the State 
Library interlibrary loan services. Workshops were held in Sac- 
ramento, Bakersfield and Los Angeles. The Papers and Proceed- 
ings of the Sacramento workshop have been published and 
distributed to the participants. Proceedings of the second and 
third workshops will also be compiled. 

(3) The Reader Services Bureau Committee, composed of the heads 
of the seven sections in the Bureau, was established. This group 
meets at least once a month to discuss the Bureau programs, 
problems, and developments. 

(4) A revised book acquisition policy was prepared, to bring up to 
date the general statement published in News Notes of California 
Libraries in October 1954. The new version has been issued in 
draft form for use within the State Library for a period of 
time during which recommended changes will be incorporated. 
It is not yet available for distribution outside the State Library. 

(5) A program was initiated to codify existing service policy for 
the State Library and to formalize service policies in areas 
where nothing now exists in writing. 

(6) Plans were prepared by those Reader Services sections needing 
expanded space or furniture shifts. A move was made in 1960-61 
to relieve the cramped space condition in the Government Pub- 
lications Section. 

(7) Progress was made in the Bureau toward the closer classifica- 
tion of librarian and clerical staff functions, with a consequent 
adjustment in reclassification of existing positions. 

(8) Work in the very preliminary stages was begun in the following 
fields : revision and codification of statistics, development of 
reader information and reader guide brochures for all sections, 
and a unified exhibit program. 

(9) Preliminary planning was completed on a two year project to 
weed the State Library collections. 

Adminisfrative Legislative Reference Section 

There was an increase of 21 percent over the previous fiscal year in 
the number of questions handled by the Administrative Legislative 
Reference Service. This increase was primarily in the Capitol Branch, 



4 NEWS NOTES OP CALlEORNtA LlBRARtEg 

providing legislative reference service to the State Legislature. In 
addition to handling this increased volume of service, the legislative 
reference staff expanded its clipping file, and developed a small collec- 
tion of legislative research materials. In conjunction with the latter 
project, a catalog was prepared providing a detailed subject approach 
to the contents of the collection. The collection of legal reference tools 
available for consultation by members of the Legislature and their 
staffs was somewhat expanded and plans were made for its further 
expansion in the future. 

In June of 1961 the Assembly adopted two resolutions: one estab- 
lished a Legislative Reference Service and the other congratulated the 
Legislative Reference Librarian on her "excellent service to the gov- 
ernment and the people of California." The Capitol Branch closed 
June 30, 1961, and the catalogs and collections were transferred to the 
State Library, where the service continued to be provided. During this 
period the reference service given the California executive agencies and 
their libraries continued as before. 

Books for the Blind Section 

Use by blind readers of the Blind Section's collection increased heavi- 
ly during 1960-61. On July 1, 1961 the collection to serve these readers 
totalled 55,168 volumes. This included 38,403 books in embossed types 
and 16,765 containers of Talking Book records. 

The California State Library asked the Library of Congress to re- 
lieve the State Library of responsibility for the distribution and repair 
of the federal government-owned Talking Book Machines, and the 
Library of Congress appointed two new agencies to take over this task. 
The effective dates of the transfer were April 1, 1961, when all machines 
lent to borrowers living in the southern part of the State were trans- 
ferred to the custody of the Braille Institute of America, in Los An- 
geles; and July 1, 1961, when all machines lent to borrowers living in 
the northern part of the State were transferred to the custody of the 
Lighthouse for the Blind, in San Francisco. The Supervising Books for 
the Blind Librarian attended several conferences and gave talks at 
meetings. An article by the Supervising Books for the Blind Librarian 
on the Conference of Regional Librarians for the Blind also appeared 
in the ABC Digest, the publication of the Associated Blind of Califor- 
nia. 

California Section 

Some 2,000 additional titles in the State Library collection were listed 
for inclusion in the supplement to California Local History; a centen- 
nial Mhliography which the Regional Resources Committee of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association is preparing. Work is well underway on the 
compilation of a list of California societies and organizations. There 
are now over 800 organizations listed, as well as references to numerous 
existing directories and special listings. At the request of the Descriptive 
Cataloging Division of the Library of Congress, the California Section 
is contributing information on some of its manuscript collections for 
inclusion in a comprehensive bibliography being prepared by the Li- 
brary of Congress. 






VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 5 

On June 16, 1961, Governor Brown dedicated the California News- 
paper Publishers Association's Newspaper Hall of Fame in the Capitol. 
This comprises six wall exhibit cases showing photographs, newspapers, 
and certificates issued by the C.N.P.A. honoring those pioneer Califor- 
nia editors it annually elects to the Newspaper Hall of Fame. The ex- 
hibits are maintained by the California State Library from a file of 
Hall of Fame material placed in the State Library by the C.N.P.A. 

Extensive editing was done on the Section's Information File, an 
index to selected items in newspapers, periodicals, and books relating to 
California. The Information File now numbers about 750,000 refer- 
ences. 

Circulation Section 

On March 6, 1961, in accordance with plans formulated in 1959-60, 
a Supervising Clerk was placed in charge of the Circulation Section. 
A schedule of regular staff meetings has been established. A special 
training program for the staff in the section has been developed so that 
each employee is receiving training in every position in the Section. 
As a result a more flexible working unit will be achieved. Training in 
working with the public is being emphasized. Some minor changes have 
been made in the charge system in an effort to establish more adequate 
control of the library materials in circulation. 

Government Publications Section 

Eeference use of the materials in the Section increased considerably 
over the preceding fiscal year. A beginning was made in expanding the 
coverage of publications of foreign governments and of technical and 
scientific publications. Staff for the administration of the Library Dis- 
tribution Act was added to the Section. The standards for depositories 
for California state publications and the manual on acquisition, process- 
ing and use of California state publications were revised and dis- 
tributed. Plans have been made for future work with state agencies, to 
ensure distribution of their publications to libraries, and for field 
surveys of depository libraries. Beginning in January, 1961, the 
methods of compiling the monthly list, California State Publications, 
were changed to the use of a Vari-typer and Acme cards and panels. 
The special project for transferring serial records from card files to 
visible files was begun and will be continued for two fiscal years. Addi- 
tional space for the Section was provided in the west end of the Cali- 
fornia Section. One of the Librarian I-II positions was reclassified to 
Supervising Typist Clerk to make possible a better division of tasks 
between librarian and clerical personnel and also to provide for im- 
proved supervision of clerical operations. 

Reference Section 

A Librarian I-II position was reclassified to a senior clerk position, 
to give direct supervision to the clerical operations in the Section, in- 
cluding the searching of interlibrary loan author requests. As the result 
of organizational changes in the Circulation Section, the Librarian II 
giving readers advisory and catalog reference at the Public Catalog 
was transferred to the Reference Section. As a part of the management 



b NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

survey a detailed study was made of searcMng procedures on inter- 
library loan requests, and subsequent streamlining of these procedures 
was accomplished. Revised procedures on author requests were put into 
effect in the spring of 1961. Suggested revisions in subject request pro- 
cedures have not been implemented as yet as additional staff is needed. 
The closed circuit teletype connecting the State Library with the North 
Bay Co-operative Library System has been joined by another which 
connects the State Library with the national TWX circuit. Any library 
having access to a TWX teletype machine can now call directly (Num- 
ber SC 26). In the spring of 1961 the Prints Room was closed to alle- 
viate crowded conditions in the Library. All art reference, and the re- 
sponsibility for and servicing of the circulating collection of art repro- 
ductions was transferred to the Reference Section. 

Sufro Library 

The Sutro Library's year was dominated by the move in August, 
1960, to new quarters at Golden Gate Avenue and Temescal Terrace in 
San Francisco (mail address, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco 17). 
Here the Library has found adequate shelving for its books immediately 
adjacent to the reading room area. In order to facilitate service in the 
growing field of American local history and genealogy, this entire col- 
lection of books was placed on open shelves. The books are available for 
self-service as weU as guided reference. With the exception of rarities, 
the closed stack section of the Library contains all other books. A 
special room for rare books in the collection was possible in the new 
quarters. This is called the Renaisssance Room. The time-saving, func- 
tional arrangement of the Library has permitted improved interlibrary 
loan and interlibrary reference service. Preliminary preparations were 
begun in this fiscal year for two important projects ; a duplicate ex- 
change and a book renovation program. Interpretative services have 
assumed more importance as community interest in Sutro Library has 
increased with exhibits, book talks, and tours. To enable the Sutro 
Library to provide additional reference service, a senior clerk position 
was reclassified to Librarian I-II. 

LAW LIBRARY 

The Law Section was transferred from the Reader Services Bureau 
and became a separate bureau called the Law Library. 

During the year the law collection was appraised against other law 
library collections and standard bibliographical sources. A special 
report, ''Critical Condition of the Law Library," was prepared by the 
Law Librarian to point up deficiencies and show the necessity for ac- 
quiring holdings of a satisfactory minimum. Attorney general opinions, 
judicial council reports, administrative court reports, U.S. Supreme 
Court briefs and records on microcards, and bound U.S. bills were new 
additions to the collection. 

The continuation of classing Anglo-American treatises by use of the 
Los Angeles County Law Library Class K covered 1,044 titles. Those 
pamphlets to be permanently retained were bound in 30 volumes and 
analyzed in the public card catalog. 



VOLUME 'j'], NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 7 

Bibliographies on "Automobile Liabiliay Insurance and the State," 
"Taxation and Accounting Materials," and "Legal Material on Nar- 
cotics" received wide circulation. The quarterly "Selected Acquisitions 
Received in the Law Library" was issued. 

Visits by the Law Librarian were made to 17 county law libraries. 
The Law Librarian, at the request of the Siskiyou County Law Library 
Board of Trustees, weeded, reshelved and ordered new material for the 
Siskiyou County Law Library. 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

Signifieant decisions made during the latter part of 1960 were put 
into effect on January 1, 1961, when the State Library adopted the 
Library of Congress Classification for all new accessions to the general 
collection, and, simultaneously, a new catalog was begun for all books 
received after January 1, 1961. The decision to adopt the Library of 
Congress Classification was based on several important considerations : 
1) The Library of Congress Classification is a much more expansible 
and flexible system than the Dewey Classification; 2) The Library of 
Congress scheme was designed for use with large collections of books, 
whereas the Dewey Classification is primarily useful in small and 
medium sized public libraries with less than 200,000 books; 3) The 
Library of Congress system is up-to-date in its coverage of subject fields 
and new knowledge, and is kept current by means of quarterly addi- 
tions and changes; 4) The Library of Congress call numbers are short 
enough to be used without difficulty by patrons and staff, whereas the 
latest edition of the Dewey contains very long numbers, particularly 
for new subject fields. 

The new catalog logically separates volumes classified in the Library 
of Congress Classification from those classified in Dewey ; it also makes 
possible the use of up-to-date subject headings and filing rules, and of 
consistent entries. The new catalog is divided into separate author-title 
and subject sections, to simplify filing and searching. 

Related to these changes in the classification system and the Public 
Catalog were plans for the declassification of periodicals and their 
arrangement by an alphabetical method on stack level 9, adjacent to 
the Periodicals Section. Moving of Dewey classes into compact shelving 
in the lower stack areas of the Library was begun, in accordance with 
an overall plan. 

Catalog Section 

Over 6,000 titles were cataloged during 1960-61 as compared with 
4,474 in 1959-60. The increase was a direct result of the 49% increase 
in the State Library Book Budget. The Catalog Section inaugurated 
new routines to accomplish the conversion to the Library of Congress 
Classification system, effect a simpler and more strictly alphabetical 
filing arrangement for the new catalog, and streamline the serials cata- 
loging procedure. 

Periodicals Section 

A new Periodicals Reading Room was opened to the public March 1, 
1961. The stacks of unbound periodicals were rearranged to provide an 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

alphabetical approach with open stacks for browsing and self service 
by patrons. A new 3-year contract was made with Micro Photo to con- 
tinue the microfilming of currently received newspapers. In April, 
1961, the Periodicals Section issued an 86-page List of Periodicals Cur- 
rently Received. It is planned to issue annual supplements of new titles. 
All through the year, holdings records for various union lists were in 
preparation: New Serials Titles, a ten-year accumulation; Union List 
of Serials, 3d edition ; List of Periodicals Abstracted ty Chemical Ab- 
stracts; and Union List of Music Periodicals Currently in Libraries of 
Northern California. 

Processing Center 

The number of volumes shipped to member libraries increased from 
39,128 in 1959-60 to 46,817 in 1960-61, and production methods were 
further refined. A workshop was held December 7, 1960, to discuss costs 
of the Center and a three-phase program for the assumption of payment 
by the member libraries. Plans were made to charge fifty cents a volume 
for processing in 1961-62, $1.00 in 1962-63, and full reimbursement of 
costs in 1963-64. 

Property and Shipping Section 

As part of the comprehensive plan for stack rearrangement, the Prop- 
erty and Shipping Section shifted and realigned government publica- 
tions and Braille and Moon type embossed books, as well as other major 
sections in the library collection. Periodical and newspaper stacks and 
other pieces of furniture and equipment were rearranged in the Period- 
icals Section for the opening of the public reading room. Similar work 
was done for other major moves in the State Library. 

Union Catalog 

The monthly average of catalog cards added to represent new acces- 
sions of member libraries increased from 11,445 in 1959-60 to 12,057 in 
1960-61. The need for additional manpower in this Section is reflected 
in the continuing backlog of cards awaiting filing and in the backlog of 
withdrawals, now over eight times its size last year. 

After study by the State Library and the Kegional Resources Coordi- 
nating Committee of the California Library Association, the Union Cata- 
log abandoned the Last Copies Plan, primarily because participation 
was insufficient to justify the expense of the Plan to the State Library 
and the small number of cooperating libraries. Efforts to increase par- 
ticipation in the Plan were not successful. During the year, the news- 
paper file was expanded to include the holdings of 331 libraries through- 
out the State. 

LIBRARY CONSULTANT SERVICES 

The Field Services Bureau was renamed Library Consultant Services 
on January 1, 1961. A restatement of the activities and goals of the 
Bureau was also made : 

"The LIBRARY CONSULTANT SERVICES provides, without 
charge — A clearing house of information on libraries and library 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 9 

practices; consultant service on library organization, administra- 
tion, housing, and equipment — to librarians, boards, and local offi- 
cials; consultant service on the establishment of libraries — to indi- 
viduals, organizations, officials, and citizen groups; workshop and 
in service training programs for librarians ; special studies of indi- 
vidual libraries to evaluate administrative policies, and to recom- 
mend effective methods of operation. 

''The LIBRARY CONSULTANT SERVICES has as its GOAL 
— ^the development and improvement of public library service 
throughout the state of California." 

In February the Consultant Services moved from the fifth floor of 
the Library to the second floor — into quarters which gave more space 
than before. This move was still considered temporary, as the room 
did not permit remodeling. [Note : a second move to the First Floor of 
the Library building was accomplished in the fall of 1961, into still 
larger quarters, which provide some individual offices for the consul- 
tants.] 

Travel Stafisfics 

The number of libraries visited this year is not as large as it has 
been in some years, due to the changes and vacancies on the staff. 
Ninety-five libraries were visited, some of them several times. The 
repeat visits were related to studies undertaken by the staff. 

Special Studies 

Several special studies were completed during the year, including a 
study of the Merced County Library, one of the Roseville-Placer County 
libraries, and one for the Lodi Public Library. Other studies begun 
this year are still in progress. 

Meetings, Workshops, Etc. 

The staff attended 23 meetings, including those held by librarian 
groups throughout the state and a number of meetings held by other 
organizations. 

By far the largest segment of meeting time was devoted to the Gov- 
ernor's Conference for Library Trustees and Officials, which took the 
place of the annual spring workshop. 

Another major event of the Spring of 1961 was the Western States 
Conference, for which the California State Library was host in May. 
Representatives of 12 Western states met together to discuss Problems 
of Library Service in Large and Sparsely Populated Areas. The meet- 
ing was planned by the consultant staff. A report on the meeting ap- 
peared in the Fall, 1961, issue of News Notes of California Libraries. 

Publications 

News Notes of California Libraries maintained its usual schedule of 
publication. The FIELD OFFICE BULLETIN attained a new look 
on its masthead, and a new name, UP AND DOWN THE STATE 
WITH THE LIBBABY CONSULTANTS. Seven issues were sent out 
to the librarians of the state. 



10 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Federal Projects 

This was an eventful year in the program conducted by the Library 
Consultant Services under the Library Services Act. 

Another project, the San Diego Bookmobile Demonstration, came to 
a successful close and was accepted by the County, to be carried on 
with County support. 

The exhibit bookmobile Avas shown at six county fairs, and was bor- 
rowed by Kern County, to demonstrate county service in its rural areas. 

The San Joaquin Valley Information Service carried out a full year 
of service to the ten member libraries in the project. Materials, such 
as booklists and annual reports, were multilithed by the project for the 
member libraries. Meetings for in-service training were held, and a brief 
correspondence course on reference work supplemented the meetings. 
Reference questions continued to provide the staff with its major bulk 
of activity, and reference books supplementing both the Fresno County 
Library collection, and those of the other member libraries were pur- 
chased by the project. 

The North Bay Cooperative Library System also completed a year 
of operation, although production from its processing center did not 
get into full swing until the fall of 1960. The film service has proved 
very popular ; the teletype which joins the service together, and links 
the system to the State Library has been in constant use ; the processing 
center output is reaching a desirable figure; the storage center for 
little-used material has received a steady flow of books from the mem- 
bers. The Children's Consultant conducted in-service training meetings 
with staff members, and developed a summer reading program and 
regular monthly book reviewing and book selection meetings for chil- 
dren's books. 

Visits were made to all State Library Processing Center member 
libraries. The enrichment of local library service through released time 
of the members took many forms, from improved catalogs to extra time 
for branch visits and community activities. 

Four scholarship recipients completed their year at library school, 
and three accepted positions in county libraries. The fourth scholarship 
recipient did not complete the agreement to work in a library serving 
rural residents. 

The "new look" was added to the LSA program by the acceptance 
of the Mendociuo County Board of Supervisors of the proposal to carry 
on a demonstration of county library service in this hitherto unserved 
county. The supervisors cast a unanimous vote for the demonstration 
project, with the understanding that, at the end of the project, the 
decision to continue library service or not be left to the vote of the 
people. Thus, after 42 years, one of the six still unserved counties of 
California will begin receiving service in the next fiscal year. The 
exhibit bookmobile and its books, films and records, have been assigned 
to the Mendocino County project. Staff will be recruited, a collection 
of books will be purchased, in-service training will be provided, and 
active community service and public relations programs will be car- 
ried out. 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

ANNUAL STATISTICS 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 
ANNUAL STATISTICS 

California library law specifies that the State Librarian shall "col- 
lect and preserve statistics and other information pertaining to libraries, 
which shall be made available to other public libraries within the State 
applying for the information. ' ' 

Such statistics are supplied, in tabular form, in the pages imme- 
diately following. Permanent files of the annual reports from which 
the statistics are compiled are maintained in the State Library's 
Consultant Services Bureau. 

Definitions: 

A library system includes a central library or libraries with branches 
and/or co-operating libraries, and with smaller library service points, 
jointly providing the public library facilities of the area. 

The term public library is used in the broad sense, to include city, 
county and district libraries which have been legally established by 
public officials, are supported by income from taxation or other public 
funds, and have their own trustees or other civil governing body. 

An agency is any service point, such as a central library, affiliated 
library, branch station, or bookmobile station, that, as an integral part 
of the public library system, distributes books or otherwise renders 
library service to the public. 

An affiliated public library is a regularly established city or district 
library which has joined the county library for supplementary service. 
The city or district library retains its own trustees or other governing 
body, and the city makes an appropriation for this local public library 
in addition to paying the county library tax. 

A branch (according to California Public Library Service Stand- 
ards) is a basic library unit operating as part of a library system, 
and with its services available to the public some part of five days a 
week. It is located in quarters with floor area of not less than 1,400 
square feet, housing a general collection of at least 7,000 volumes. It 
has a staff equivalent to at least one professional and one nonprofes- 
sional employee on duty during time the branch is open to the public. 

A station is a library unit smaller than a branch and operating as 
part of a library system. A school which is served by a public library 
and has not a central library room meeting the conditions of a branch 
is a school station. It is counted as one agency even though the books 
ma}^ be divided into a number of classroom collections. A branch housed 
in a school but giving service to the whole community is counted as a 
community agency; a school agency affiliated for school service, as a 
school agency. 

Circulation represents statistics kept of actual count according to 
an established system. Total circulation of book materials is the count 
of one for each bound volume, pamphlet or periodical lent for home 

(12) 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1962 13 

use, from the central library and its agencies, and the count of each 
renewal. A public library includes in its total circulation the count of 
books lent from schools for home use. A county library also includes 
the circulation of county library books from all its agencies, including 
affiliated libraries, which do not include such count in their own annual 
report totals. 

The collection and circulation of nonbook materials is counted sepa- 
rately from that of book materials. The unit count of all types of sound 
recording is by disc or reel, of films by title. Circulation of all such 
miscellaneous materials is one for each unit lent. For example, the 
count of recordings is by disc, regardless of record speed or numbers of 
titles on a recording. The count of films is by title, and circulation is 
equivalent to the number of times a film title is in use for showings, 
regardless of the number of persons in the audience for such showings. 

Interlibrary loans are loans between libraries which do not form part 
of a system. (Such intersystem loans are included under Shipments). 
Circulation by the borrowing library of a book borrowed on interlibrary 
loan is included in circulation; the interlibrary loan itself is not. 

A shipment from the central library is a group of items sent to one 
agency at one time. 

The count of employees is by total number and by full-time equiva- 
lent of part-time and other employees. Professional employees are de- 
fined as those who are college or university and library school graduates, 
and those who have attained professional status through library ex- 
perience and/or examination. They perform work of professional grade 
which requires training and skill in the theoretical or scientific parts 
of library work (as distinguished from its merely mechanical parts). 
If paid from the library budget, janitors and building force are in- 
cluded in the total count of employees. 

Operating expenses are divided into three categories : salaries, li- 
brary materials, service and supplies. 

Capital expenses include only such major outlay items as buildings, 
additions and remodeling, sites, furniture and equipment, motor ve- 
hicles. Expenditures for books and other ''library materials" are listed 
under operating expenses. 



14 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



NUMBER OF LIBRARIES BY TYPE 

1,959 California libraries are listed in the directory for the year 
1960-61, as follows:* 

Public Libraries — 218 (with 3,952 outlets) 

1 state library 
51 coiiuty fi-pe libraries 
8 library district libraries (Altadena, Beaumont, Buena Park, Palos Verdes, 

Palo Verde Valley, Placentia, Upper Lake, Torba Linda) 
4 union high school district libraries (Banning, Coalinga, Dixon, Vaeaville) 
154 municipal libraries 

Law Libraries — 76 

59 county law libraries (including five branch libraries) 
IT miscellaneous law libraries 

School and Other Educational Institution Libraries — -1,256 

11 university libraries 

14 state college libraries 

58 four-year college libraries 

65 separate junior college libraries 
808 public high school, junior high school or combined high school and junior 

college libraries 
149 private or special school and other educational institution libraries 
114 centralized school libraries and teachers' professional 

37 county teachers' libraries 

Miscellaneous Special Libraries — 409 

346 miscellaneous institution, association and business libraries 
63 armed forces installation libraries 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES STATISTICAL SUMAAARY, 1960-61 



Iter 



Public 
libraries 



State 
library 



Total 



Per 
capita' 



Number of libraries reporting 

Outlets (central library, branches and sta 

tions) 

Registered users 

Total volumes 

Circulation — book materials 

Circulation — non-book materials 

Total income 

Income from taxation 

Federal funds 

Total operating expenditures 

Spent for salaries 

Spent for books and periodicals 

Capital outlay 



206 

3,949 

4,759,857 

22,131,965 

84.795,685 

1,299,143 

241,365,440 

334,823,886 

336,7Y2',274 

?25,512,318 

?6,241,828 

?6,818,309 



3 

b 

733,556 

167,677 

124,920 

31,171.817 

3941,742 

3230,075 

31,126,255 

'•3743,400 

■13113,371 



207 

3,952 

4,759,857 

22,665,521 

84,963,362 

1,424,063 

342,537,257 

335,765,628 

3230,075 

337,704,016 

326,255,718 

36,355,099 

36,818,309 



.30 
1.44 
5.41 

.09 
2.71 
2.28 

.0146 
2.40 
1.67 

.40 

.43 



^ Based on 1960 census of 15,717,204. Only 97,997 persons are without local library seniee. Facilities of 
the California State Library are available to all residents, however. Those who have no local library 
sernce may borrow diiectly from the State Library, and others may request service through their city 
or county libraries. 

b Tlie State Library is one of a number of public libraries which ask only for personal identification rather 
than formal registration of borrowers. 

"= The proportion of total expenditures that was outlay for salaries was 66%. 

'i The proportion of total expenditures that was outlay for books and periodicals was 10%. 

* Total of 1959 excludes two public, two junior college and two state college libraries 
established or to be established after the fiscal year. Total also excludes the 
three Library Services Act demonstration projects. The total includes non- 
reporting as well as reporting libraries. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



15 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEMS GROUPED BY 
POPULATION OF AREA TAXED AND SERVED 

Grouping of public libraries on the basis of population served fol- 
lows to some extent the classification of libraries employed in the Public 
Library Inquiry and specifications in the Public Library Service Stand- 
ards for California. Two changes in population groupings have been 
made in this edition, from those used in previous years. The number 
of groupings have been expanded from four to five, by splitting a pre- 
vious grouping, population 25,001-100,000 into two groupings, 25,001- 
50,000 and 50,001-100,000. The maximum of the smallest population 
range has been raised from 7,500 to 10,000 population. These changes 
have been made for the following reasons : To reflect the continuing 
growth of the State, and the consequent growth in library populations 
served, and to offer easier and more meaningful comparisons with li- 
braries nationally. The new population categories parallel, in most 
eases, the population groupings selected for various federal surveys of 
libraries. The 10,000 population figure is employed by the U. S. 
Library Services Branch to distinguish between urban and rural popu- 
lation areas for Library Services Act purposes. 

This listing of all public libraries runs together county, district and 
municipal libraries within the five groups of population they serve 
(based on 1960 final census figures) . 

It should be noted, therefore, that the statistics for an individual 
library affiliated with a larger library will appear only under the 
larger population group of the entire library system (i.e., the total 
population served by all affiliated library units in one system, such 
as a county library and several affiliated municipal or district libraries, 
or such as two county libraries). 

To provide a uniform base for population figures, the official U. S. 
census of 1960 (Final) is used.* Since population figures are for area 
taxed and served, the population listed for a county library does not 
include population of cities (in that county) operating independent 
and unaffiliated public libraries. Population figures of affiliated libraries 
are, therefore, listed in parentheses to indicate they have been included 
in the population figure for the larger service unit or library system. 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEMS CLASSIFIED BY POPULATION 
SERVED— SUMMARY OF TABULATIONS, 1960-61 





Population group 


Total 
library 
systems 


Type of independent 
public library 


Type of affiliated 
public library 


Total 
public 
libraries 


Munici- 
pal 


County 


District 


Munici- 
pal 


County 


District 


57 




(30) 
(27) 
(30) 
(43) 
(34) 


15 
17 
21 
32 
28 


IS 
9 
7 

10 
3 


2 

1 
3 


21 
5 
3 
7 


3 
2 


3 


36 
33 


Serving 50,001 to 100,000 

Serving 25,001 to 50,000 

Serving 10,001 to 25,000 


2 


52 
34 


2 














212 




(164) 


113 


44 


7 


36 


7 


5 



The count of 164 library systems equals the count of Independent public libraries (through which 4S other 
public libraries are served by affiliation). The count of 212 public libraries included the 164 independent and 
the 48 affiliated libraries. 



* U. S. Bureau of the Census. U. S. Census of population: 1960. Number of inhabit- 
ants, California. Final report PC (1)-6A. U. S. Government Printing OfHce, W^ash- 
ington, D. C, 1961. 



16 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOBNIA LIBRARIES 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY 
Based on 1960-61 Annual Reports 



County 

Counties without library service: 
Alpine J' 

Del Norte 

Lake 

Mendocino 

Nevada 

Yuba 

Counties contracting with other counties for 
service: 
Mariposa (Merced) 

Mono (Inyo) 

Sierra (Plumas) 

Counties contracting with cities for county 
library service: 
Riverside (Riverside City) 



Independent municipal or 

library district libraries 

(116) 



Municipal or district libraries 

affiliated with county library 

(4S) 



San Joaquin (Stockton City) 

Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara City). 

Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz City) 



Counties maintaining county library service: 
Alameda 



Amador- 
Butte... 



Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa. 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Glenn 



None 

Crescent City 

Lakeport 
Upper Lake 

Fort Bragg 

Ukiah 

Willits 

Grass Valley 
Nevada City 

Marysville 



None 
None 
None 

None 



Lodi 

None 



Watsonville 

Alameda 

Albany 

Berkeley 

Hayward 

Livermore 

Oakland 

San Leandro 

None 

Chico 
Oroville 

None 

None 

Richmond 

None 

Coalinga 

None 



None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 



Banning 

Beaumont 

Coachella 

Corona 

Elsinore 

Hemet 

Indio 

Palm Springs 

Palo Verde Valley 

Perris 

Riverside 

San Jacinto 

Stockton 

Lompoc 
Santa Barbara 
Santa Maria 

Santa Cruz 



None 



None 



Gridley 

Angels Camp 

Colusa 

None 

None 

None 

Orland 
Willows 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



17 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY- 

Continued 

Based on 1960-61 Annual Reports 





Independent municipal or 


Municipal or district libraries 




library district libraries 


affiliated with county library 


County 


(116) 


(45) 


Humboldt 


Eureka 


Areata 




Ferndale 


Imperial 


Brawley 


Calexico 




El Centro 


Imperial 


Inyo 


None 


None 


Kern... 


None 
Hanford 


None 


Kings 


None 


Lassen 


None 
Alhambra 


None 


Los Angeles 


Torrance 




Altadena 






Arcadia 






Azusa 






Beverly Hills 






Burbank 






Covina 






Downey 






El Segundo 






Glendale 






Glendora 






Long Beach 






Los Angeles 






Monrovia 






Monterey Park 






Palos Verdes 






Pasadena 






Pomona 






Redondo Beach 






San Marino 






Santa Fe Springs 






Santa Monica 






Sierra Madre 






Signal Hill 






South Pasadena 






Vernon 






Whittier 




Madera 


None 
Larkspur 


None 


Marin 


None 




Mill Valley 






San Anselmo 






San Rafael 






Sausalito 




Merced... 


None 
None 
A/Tonterey 


None 


Modoc 


None 


Monterey 


Carmel 




Pacific Grove 


King City 




Salinas 




Napa 


Calistoga 


None 




Napa 






St. Helena 




Orange 


Anaheim 


None 




Buena Park 






Fullerton 






Huntington Beach 






Newport Beach 






Orange 






Placentia 






Santa Ana 






Yorba Linda 




Placer 


Auburn 
Lincoln 


None 








Roseville 





18 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES ARRANGED BY COUNTY- 

Continued 

Based on 1960-61 Annual Reports 



County 



Independent municipal or 

library district libraries 

(116) 



Municipal or district libraries 

affiliated with county library 

(45) 



Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino- 

San Diego 



San Francisco 

San Luis Obispo . 

San Mateo 



Santa Clara- 



Shasta.-. 
Siskiyou - 
Solano--- 



Sonoma- 



None 

Sacramento 

None 

Ontario 

Redlands 

San Bernardino 

Upland 

Carlsbad 
Chula Vista 
Coronado 
Escondido 
National City 
Oceanside 
San Diego 

San Francisco 

Paso Robles 
San Luis Obispo 

Burlingame 

Daly City 

Redwood City 

San Bruno 

San Mateo 

South San Francisco 

Gilroy 
Los Gatos 
Mountain View 
Palo Alto 
San Jose 
Santa Clara 
Sunnyvale 

None 

Yreka 

Vallejo 



Cloverdale 
Healdsburg 
Petaluma 



None 

None 

San Juan Bautista 

Colton 

None 



None 
None 

Menlo Park 



None 



None 

Etna 

Benicia 

Dixon 

Vacaville 

None 





Santa Rosa 
Sebastopol 
Sonoma 






None 


Modesto 




Turlock 


Sutter 


None 


None 




Red Bluff 

None 






None 




None 


Porterville 




Tulare 
Visalia 




None 

Oxnard 
Santa Paula 


Sonora 




Ventura 






Yolo 


Woodland 


None 







Note: As of June 30, 1961. For libraries established since that date, see in Directory: Commerce, Inglewood. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER 
OF VOLUMES-1 960-61 



19 



Total volumes 


Number of libraries reporting 


1000000 — 2 765 891 .- 


2 


600 000 — 999,999 


3 


300 000 — S99 999 - 


11 




Total 16 or 8% 


100 000—299,999 


34 




Total 34 or 18% 


50 000—99,999 


38 




Total • 38 or 20% 


30,000 — 49 999 


42 


20 000 — 29 999 


24 




Total 66 or 36% 


10000—19,999 


22 




Total 22 or 11% 


5 000—9,999 


11 


346 — 4,999 


4 




Total 15 or 8% 




191 







Fifty public libraries, or 26.2% of those reporting, have over 100,000 volumes; 37, or 19.4%, have less 
than 20,000 volumes. 



CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES CLASSIFIED BY OPERATING 
EXPENDITURES-1 960-61 



Expenditures 
(Exclusive of capital outlay) 


Number of libraries reporting 


Over S4 000 000 


2 


gl 000,000—1,999,999 _ 


4 




Total 6 or 3.1% 


3500,000—999,999 


8 


300,000 — 499,999 


12 


200 000—299,999 


10 


100,000—199,999 


27 




Total 57 or 29.2% 


g75 000— 99,999 . .-- 


17 


50,000—74,999 


23 




Total 40 or 20.5% 


540,000—49,999 - - 


14 


30,000—39,999 . 


19 


20,000—29,999 


18 


10,000—19,999 


15 




Total 66 or 33.8% 


35,000—9,999 


16 


1,000 — 4,999 - -- . 


9 


Less than 31,000 .-. . .. 


1 




Total 26 or 13.4% 


Total libraries reporting expenditures 


195 



20 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 





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VOLUME lyj, NO. I, WINTER, I962 



21 



DISTRIBUTION OF CALIFORNIA MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES 
BY POPULATION (1960 Census) 



10,000 or less 


10,001 to 25,000 


25,001 to 50,000 


50,001 to 100,000 


Over 100,000 


(57) 


(44) 


(27) 


(20) 


(13) 


Angels Camp* 


Albany 


Altadena Lib. Dist. 


Alameda 


Anaheim 


Areata* 


Azusa 


Arcadia 


Alhambra 


Berkeley 


Auburn 


Banning UH.S.L.D. 


Beverly Hills 


Buena Park Lib. 


Glendale 


Beaumont Lib. Dist. 


Brawley 


Chula Vista 


Dist. 


Long Beach 


Benicia* 


Burlingame 


Daly City 


Burbank 


Los Angeles 


Biggs* 


Chico 


Eureka 


Downey 


Oakland 


Calexico* 


Coalinga 


Menlo Park* 


Fullerton 


Pasadena 


Calistoga 


UH.S.L.D. 


Modesto* 


Hayward 


Sacramento 


Carlsbad 


Colton* 


Monrovia 


Palo Alto 


San Diego 


Carmel* 


Corona* 


Monterey Park 


Pomona 


San Francisco 


Cloverdale 


Coronado 


Mountain View 


Richmond 


San Jose 


Coachella* 


Covina 


National City 


Riverside* 


Santa Ana 


Colusa* 


El Centre 


Newport Beach 


San Bernardino 


Torrance* 


Corning* 


El Segundo 


Ontario 


San Leandro 




Crescent City 


Escondido 


Orange 


San Mateo 




Dixon U.H.S.D.L.* 


Glendora 


Oxnard 


Santa Barbara* 




Elsinore* 


Hanford 


Pales Verdes Lib. 


Santa Clara 




Etna* 


Huntington Beach 


Dist. 


Santa Monica 




Ferndale* 


Indio* 


Redlands 


Stockton* 




Ft. Bragg 


Livermore 


Redondo Beach 


Sunnyvale 




Gilroy 


Lodi 


Redwood City 


Vallejo 




Grass Valley 


Lompoc* 


Salinas 






Gridley* 


Mill Valley 


San Bruno 






Healdsburg 


Monterey 


Santa Cruz* 






Hemet* 


Napa 


Santa Rosa 






Imperial* 


Oceanside 


South San Francisco 






King City* 


Pacific Grove 


Ventura* 






Lakeport 


Palm Springs* 


Whittier 






Larkspur 


Palo Verde Valley 








Lincoln 


District* 








Los Gatos 


Petaluma 








Marysville 


Roseville 








Nevada City 


San Anselmo 








Orland* 


San Luis Obispo 








Oroville 


San Marino 








Paso Robles 


San Rafael 








Perris* 


Santa Fe Springs 








Placentia Lib. Dist. 


Santa Maria* 








Porterville* 


Santa Paula 








Red Bluff 


South Pasadena 








St. Helena 


Tulare* 








San Jacinto* 


Upland 








San Juan Bautista* 


Vacaville 








Sausalito 


UH.S.L.D.* 








Sebastopol 


Visalia* 






' 


Sierra Madre 


Watsonville 








Signal Hill 


Woodland 








Sonoma 










Sonora* 










Turlock* 










Ukiah 










Upper Lake Lib. Dist. 










Vernon 










Willits 










Willows* 










Yorba Linda L. Dist. 










Yreka 











* Affiliated with County Libraiy. 



22 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAKIES 



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X X XI xxx!xxxi>< y, X xxxxx y.y. yy, yy yyy yy yy 



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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



29 



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VOLUME <^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1962 



33 



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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



35 



XIX X XXXi X! X! ixi X! 




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21 SANTA MONICA 

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24 SONOMA CO.. 

STOCKTON (See Table 1-28) 

25 SUNNYVALE 

26 VALLEJO 

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37 



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VOLUME '^'], NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



39 



13,409 
38,435 




i 


■* 1 





UO 1 OOON 0» 


1 

00' 


00 1 


00 ■ 

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5,563 
12,191 


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108,527 

107,607 
41,370 




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10 


109,454 

116,192 
117,043 




217,981 

1,830 

(5,648) 

223,799 

158,413 

379,822 





OO 1 -^^ 00 








32,762 
598 

39,419 
33,350 

34,978 


OO 

q_ 


27 SISKIYOU CO 

27a Etna 

28 SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 


lo 1 
irn 1 

;h ; 

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40 



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A^OLUME 57> N^O- I J WINTER, I962 



41 



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42 



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o 
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Q. 
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3 

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a 

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o 

Ui 

e 
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** 

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'"Y68',o66" 
176,800 
tl3,350 
25,000 

16,250 

25,000 


13,500 

164,300 
206,786 
132,108 

47,593 
107,116 

64,341 

253,339 

334,689 

56,500 

92,734 


^1 


16,336 
100,000 
82,000 
50,000 
30,000 
28,000 
50,000 
40,000 
13,850 

12,000 
15,000 
70,000 

50,000 
65,000 
60,000 
145,320 
70,000 
35,000 

73,934 
72,000 
60,000 

45,000 




4,050 
35,923 
10,415 
12,800 
10,500 

2,610 
13,400 

2,384 

3,600 

1,944 
1,296 
7,600 

12,000 
15,000 
8,400 
5,041 
10,470 
6,000 

18,480 

22,140 

8,200 

9,614 


4.) 


t^, so r^ tn 3 
OsONCsCs OS 


1905 
1924 
1918- 
60 
1953 
1890 
1917 

1957 
1960 
1958 


1953 
1929- 

52 
1960 
1961 
1906- 

50 
1930- 

54 




1926 
1919 
1929 
1912 
1920 
1947 
1878 
1912 
1919 

1905 
1912 
1910 

1907 
1929 
1905 
1920 
1895 
1921 

1885 
1894 
1907 

1928 










3 

3 
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I 



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b 

c 

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3 

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j5 

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10 MADERA CO 

MENLO PARK (See Table I-23a) 
MODESTO (McHenry) (See 
Table I-27a) 

11 MONROVIA 

12 MONTEREY PARK... 

n MOUNTAIN VIEW 


14 NAPA CO 

15 NATIONAL CITY 

16 NEWPORT BEACH 

17 ONTARIO 


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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



43 



X! p<| >^xxj xixxx ;x; X 




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134,825 

70,000 

85,000 
258,000 
252,000 

86,147 

534,400 




to 

■* 

00 


145,000 

60,000 

65,000 
50,000 
72,000 

38,000 
63,000 

45,337 
125,000 




33,150 

10,168 

13,670 
20,000 
15,520 

8,000 
2,585 

■""7"8i7" 

5,084 
23,210 





1898- 

1908- 

21-26- 

30 
1930- 

60 
1939 
1960 
1955- 

60 

"1916^ 
41-53- 
57 
1954 

1959 




1895 

1908 

1904 
1909 
1934 

1884 
1951 
1904 
1916 

1917 
1900 




21 REDLANDS 

22 REDONDO BEACH 

23 REDWOOD CITY 

24 SALINAS 

25 SAN BRUNO 

26 SANTA ROSA 

27 SISKIYOU CO 

27a Etna 

28 SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

29 SUTTER CO 

VENTURA (See Table I-30a) 

30 WHITTIER 


4J 

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44 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARtilS 



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VOLUME 57j NO. I, WINTEE, I962 



45 



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46 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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50 

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12,703 
24,036 
10,289 
report 
14,591 
11,539 


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18,018 
21,024 
16,811 
14,014 
18,107 
20,752 
17,075 
(2.534) 


0^8 


11,684 
(2,129) 
13,597 
16,018 
22,229 


5 




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VOLUME 57j no. I, WINTER, I962 



47 



CTs_C 


To", 849" 
307 












1 

c 






ss 




^ 




t^ i 


ON 




1 1 iMCTs im 

1 1 icvivo 1 


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\0 ' 












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ON 
NO 


0^00 t~.OOCM lo 
00 l^t^N c 


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it^ mu-ll^ 00 
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t^I-^ 1 i 1 r 1 1 
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M3_ 










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C^u^ II 1 1 1 1 
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On 












93,937 
45,810 
59,543 
30,245 

77,610 
39,696 
32,397 
1,911 
42,372 
29,199 
61,085 


ODt^oO 
MDO'CS 


^0— CTs 
00— iiovO 
On"— <'ci 


^" m" 0*10 




on' 




11 Sill 
II ^"111 


















5 















169,162 
71,422 

125,599 
81,448 

105,107 
93,774 
65,810 
7,578 
58,765 
68,928 
42,033 


CMU-ip.) 

c*^ cs m 


rnaNOr>l 
00— i-^-r^ 

LO-H^_QO_ 

ctTo"^"'-'' 


t-- t^OO 
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Tt On 0OU-, 


1 
S 


278,061 
121,227 
185,142 
111,693 

182,717 
133,470 

98,207 

9,489 

101,137 

97,127 
103,118 


-*CMc^O t^OsrtO I-^t^Oun a\o 
oou-jt^-^ t^Ot^^ O^Ot^--^ r^to 
tNOO_^_^^_ "*'^i'~~.*. '^.'HCi'^. "*.'~^ 
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1 


23,000 
22,170 
24,722 
11,511 

14,035 
23,978 
11,620 
(2,247) 
13,421 
11,612 
15,263 
(1,046) 
21,500 
13,500 
20,293 
16,342 

13,237 
19,357 
15,097 
(3,006) 

15,000 
(2,968) 

15,000 

13,293 
13,329 


NO 
NO 


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1 1 I.C 1 1 1 1 
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48 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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Volume '^'j, no. i, winter, 1962 



49 



t^COO lOOOlr^ tr-Ht^VOt^ ^rtl^ 



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5,474 

1,500 
9,437 

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4,876 

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Table II-23b) 
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334 

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1,114 

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5,501 
3,559 

3,868 

1,350 
3,122 
1,259 
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2 

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1 AMADOR CO 

ANGELS CAMP (See Table IV- 

5a) 
ARCATA (See Table II-8a) 

2 AUBURN 

BENICIA (See Table II-23a) 
BIGGS (See Table II-4a) 
CALEXICO (See Table III-8a) 

3 CALISTOGA 

4 CARLSBAD 

CARMEL (HARRISON) (See 

Table I-lla) 

5 CLOVERDALE 

COACHELLA (See Table I-15c) 
COLUSA (See Table IV-8a) 
CORNING (See Table IV-38a) 

6 CRESCENT CITY... 

DIXON U.H.S.L. DIST. (See 

Table II-23b) 
ELSINORE (See Table I-15e) 
ETNA (See Table III-28a) 
FERNDALE (See Table II-8b) 

7 FORT BRAGG 

8 GILROY 

9 GRASS VALLEY 

GRIDLEY (See Table llAh) 

10 HEALDSBURG 

HEMET (See Table I-15f) 
IMPERIAL (See Table III-9b) 
KING CITY (See Table I-llb) 

11 LAKEPORT 

12 LARKSPUR 

13 LINCOLN 

14 LOS GATOS... 

MARIPOSA CO. (See Table II- 

10a) 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



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MARYSVILL 
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PLACENTIA 
PORTERVIL 

29a) 
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58 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



59 



xx: XX X XX X XX xx xxx xx xx xx 



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60 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



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982 

1,135 
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674 


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1,898 
2,248 
1,611 


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7,548 
12,792 

7,837 

4,150 
5,917 
3,812 


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cs) 

to 


18,850 
""27'i86" 


cs 

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11,457 
14,817 

11,339 

7,183 
9,099 
6,097 


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Li- 
brary- 
Tax 
Rate 
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2100) 






OS lo 


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len ,-1 P<< rH 


2 w> 
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16,540 

14,800 

9,187 

10,634 

7,500 


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13 

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13 


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to 


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9,591 
16,504 

10,833 

6,296 
8,869 
6,100 


Total 
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cs 

■* 

W5. 


18,850 


No report 
10,222 


No report 
9,798 
17,376 

11,355 

7,044 
9.580 
6,100 








2 
3 

3 

1^ 


8 

pi 

s 

< 
<; 


ANGELS CAMP (See Table IV- 

5a) 
ARCATA (See Table II-8a) 

2 AUBURN 

BENICIA (See Table II-23a) 
BIGGS (See Table II-4a) 
CALEXICO (See Table III-8a) 

3 CALISTOGA 

4 CARLSBAD 

CARMEL (HARRISON) (See 

Table I-lla) 

5 CLOVERDALE 

COACHELLA (See Table I-15c) 
COLUSA (See Table IV-8a) 
CORNING (See Table IV-38a) 

6 CRESCENT CITY 

DIXON U.H.S.D. (See Table II- 

23b) 
ELSINORE (See Table I-15e) 
ETNA (See Table III-28a) 
FERNDALE (See Table Il-Sb) 

7 FORT BRAGG... 

8 GILROY 

9 GRASS VALLEY 

GRIDLEY (See Table II-4b) 

10 HEALDSBURG 

HEMET (See Table I-15f) 
IMPERIAL (See Table III-9b) 
KING CITY (See Table I-llb) 

11 LAKEPORT 

12 LARKSPUR 

13 LINCOLN 



VOLUME '^J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



61 






■ 





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LOS GATOS 

MARIPOSA CO. (See Table T 

10a) 

MARYSVILLE 

MODOC CO , 

MONO CO. (See Table IV-18a 

NEVADA CITY '. 

ORLAND (See Table IV-lSa) 

OROVILLE.... 

PASO ROBLES 

PERRIS (See Table I-lSj) 
PLACENTIA LIB. DIST..... 
PORTERVILLE (See Table 

29a) 
RED BLUFF (HERBERT 

KRAFT)... 

ST. HELENA 

SAN JACINTO (See Table I-IS 
SAN JUAN BAUTISTA (S- 


Table IV-31a; 

SAUSALITO. 

SEBASTOPOL 

SIERRA CO. (See Table IV-28, 

SIERRA MADRE. 

SIGNAL HILL.. 

SONOMA -.. 

SONORA (See Table IV-39a) 

TRINITY CO 

URIAH 

UPPER LAKE LIB. DIST... 

VERNON 

WILLITS 

WILLOWS (See Table IV-lSb) 
YORBA LINDA LIB. DIST. 
YREKA 


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CO CO CO 







62 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



6 



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o 

a 

z 
o 



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2 8 

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_. '-' 

UJ 

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Sick 
Leave 
Allow- 
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per 
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tH O CN (M r^ r^ c^ C-) r^j CNi r^j u-i (X) (M (N \o CM r-3 r^r^ iiorMCNr>^<M i^u-i 




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In- 
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in 
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Monterey 

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Orange 

Placer 

Plumas 

Riverside (See Riverside P. L.) 

Sacramento 

San Benito 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



63 



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VOLUME 1$^^ NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



67 



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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



69 



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VOLUME <j'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1962 



71 



60 
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Placentia Lib. Dist. 

Red Bluff 

St. Helena - 

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San Juan Bautista 

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Sierra Madre — 

Signal Hill 

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CLASS TITLES 

In the attempt to use a fairly uniform terminology for professional 
library classes, we define class titles in common use in terms of the 
following general duty statements that suggest the various levels of 
personnel classification : 

Professional Employee — ^An employee in a position which requires 
college or university education and library school graduation, and 
performance of work of a grade which necessitates training and skill 
in the theoretical or scientific parts of library work (as distinguished 
from its mechanical parts). Applies to all classes in this list. 

Assistant Librarian — Professional employee who co-ordinates the work 
of section supervisors or principal librarians, assuming a major por- 
tion of planning and policy-making for the library as a whole. 

Branch Librarian — Professional employee in charge of an auxiliary 
library agency which has separate quarters, a permanent staff, a reg- 
ular schedule and a permanent basic collection of library materials. 

Chief Librarian— JjihrsiTian who assumes responsibility for operation 
of the entire library, integrating its work with that of other city or 
county departments, university or college departments, or other 
major parts of the larger organization; makes final decisions on 
policies, plans and programs. 

Department Head — Professional employee who plans, organizes and 
directs the work of the staff of a major section or department of the 
library; reviews work and passes on difficult problems, and does 
highly skilled professional work. 

Junior Librarian (Librarian I) — Beginning professional position, re- 
quiring a college or university education, plus a degree from an 
accredited library school. This is the trainee grade, for which no 
professional experience is required. 

Principal Librarian — Professional employee who plans, organizes and 
directs the work of several sections or departments or a particular 
kind of work (e.g. children's work) in the library system; makes 
recommendations on policy organization and procedures; develops 
programs of service. 

Senior Librarian (Librarian II) — Professional employee doing varied 
and difficult professional library work under general supervision; 
may also be responsible for a subordinate function, and exercise 
supervisory responsibility over a small staff or act as assistant super- 
visor of a large staff. 

Nonprofessional Employee — Employee in a position, the duties of 
which are of a mechanical and/or routine nature, not requiring 
professional library education. 



(72) 



VOLUME ^-J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 

lA. CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY PAY RANGES 1962 



73 



Professional Librarian Qasses 
Civil service — exempt: 

State librarian 

Assistant state librarian 

Civil service ratings: 

Librarian V (principal librarian) 

Library consultant 

Law librarian 

Librarian IV (supervising librarian) 

Supervising blind section librarian 

Supervising order librarian 

Librarian III (supervising librarian) 

Librarian II (senior librarian)* 

Librarian I (junior librarian)* 

The first salary raise for Librarian I is granted after completion of the six-month's probationary period, 
and the next raise 1 year later. 

1 B. Nonprofessional Classes (All Civil Service) 



213,230 per annum 


1 


821-862-905-950-998 


-- 


?676-710-745-782-821 


2 


676-710-745-782-821 


6 


676-710-745-782-821 


1 


556-584-613-644-676 


6 


505-530-556-584-613 


1 


481-505-530-556-584 


1 


481-505-530-556-584 


8 


436-458-481-505-530 


15!^ 


415-436-458 


3 



Storekeeper II-A 

Storekeeperl 

Supervising clerk I 

Supervising typist-clerk 

Supervisor of book repair 

Senior typist-clerk 

Seniorclerks 

Senior file clerks 

Stock clerk 

Photocopyist 

Intermediate stenographer-clerk 

Intermediate typist-clerk (range B) 

Serviceman, book reproducers for the blind 

Intermediate typist-clerk (range A) 

Intermediate clerk 

Book repairer 

Elevator operator 

Duplicating machine operator 

Junior typist-clerk 

Junior clerk 



2458^81-505-530-556 
395-^15-436-458-181 
415^36-458^81-505 
415^36-458-481-505 
376-395^15^36-458 
376-395^15^36-458 
376-395-415^36-458 
376-395-415-436-458 
358-376-395-415-136 
341-358-376-395^15 
341-358-376-395-415 
341-358-376-395-415 
325-341-358-376-395 
325-341-358-376-395 
325-341-358-376-395 
310-325-341-358-376 
310-325-341-358-376 
295-310-325-341-358 
295-310-325-341-358 
281-295-310-325-341 



1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
10 
3 
1 
6 
2 
1 
6 
1 

25 
7 
1 
1 
1 
6 



The first pay raise of most nonprofessional classifications is granted after completion of the six-month's 
probationary period. Subsequent raises are annual thereafter. 



' Appointments may be made at second step. 



74 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBKARIES 



INDEX TO COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL LIBRARY 
SALARY TABLES 



Library 



A. K. Smiley P. L.. 

Alameda Co. F. L 

Alameda P. L 

Albany P. L 

Alhambra P. L 

Altadena L. Dist. L 

Amador Co. F. L 

Anaheim P. L 

Angels Camp P. L 

Arcadia P. L 

Areata P. L 

Auburn P. L 

Azusa P. L 

Banning Union High School Dist. L 

Beaumont L. Dist. L 

Benicia P. L 

Berkeley P. L 

Beverly Hills P. L 

Biggs P. L 

(Blythe) Palo Verde Valley Dist. L 

Brawley P. L 

Buena Park h. Dist. L 

Burbank P. L 

Burlingame P. L 

Butte Co. F. L 

Calaveras Co. F. L 

Calezico P. L 

Calistoga P. L 

Carlsbad P. L. _- 

(Carmel) Harrison Memorial L 

Chico P. L 

Chula Vista P. L 

Cloverdale P. L 

Coachella P. L 

Coalinga Union High School Dist. L 

Colton P. L - 

Colusa Co. F. L 

Colusa P. L 

Commerce P. L 

Contra Costa Co. F. L 

Corning P. L 

Corona P. L 

Coronado P. L 

Covina P. L 

Crescent City P. L 

Daly City P. L . 

Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial P. L. 

Dixon Union High School Dist. L 

Downey P. L 

El Centro P. L 

El Dorado Co. F. L 

El Segundo P. L 

Elsinore P. L 

Escondido P. L 

Etna P. L 

Eureka P. L 

Ferndale P. L 

Fort Bragg P. L 

Fresno Co. F. L 

FuUerton P. L 

Gilroy P. L. 

Glendale P. L 

Glendora P. L 

Glenn Co. F. L 

Goodman P. L 

Grass Valley P. L 

Gridley P. L 

Hanford P. L... 

Harrison Memorial L 

Hayward P. L 

Healdsburg Carnegie P. L 

Hemet P. L 

Herbert Kraft P. L 

Humboldt Co. F. L 

Huntington Beach P. L 

Imperial Co. F. L 

Imperial P. L 

Indio P. L 

Inyo Co. F. L. 



V 

II 

IV 

VI 

IV 

V 

II 
III 

V 

VII 

VII 

VI 

VI 

VI 

VII 

III 

V 

VII 

VI 

VI 

IV 

IV 

VI 

II 
II 

VII 

VII 

VII 

VII 

VI 

V 

VII 

VII 

VI 

VI 

II 

VII 
VII 

II 

VI 
VI 
VI 

* 

VI 
VI 



II 

IV 
VII 

III 

VI 

II 

VI 

VII 

VII 

VI 

VII 

IV 

VII 

VII 

VII 

II 

VI 

II 

VII 
VII 

II 



Kern Co. F. L 

King City P. L 

Kings Co. F. L 

Lakeport P. L 

Larkspur P. L 

Lassen Co. F. L 

Lincoln P. L 

Livermore P. L 

Lodi P. L .- 

Lompoc P. L 

Long Beach P. L 

Los Angeles Co. P. L 

Los Angeles P. L 

Los Gatos P. L 

Madera Co. F. L 

Marin Co. F. L 

Mariposa Co. F. L 

Marysville City P. L 

McHenry P. L 

Menlo Park P. L. 

Merced Co. F. L 

Mill Valley P. L 

(Modesto) McHenry P. L 

Modoc Co. F. L 

Monrovia P. L 

Monterey Co. F. L 

Monterey P. L 

Monterey Park P. L 

Mountain View P. L 

Napa Co. F. L 

(Napa) Goodman P. L 

National City P. L 

Nevada City P. L 

Newport Beach P. L 

Oakland P. L 

Oceanside P. L 

Ontario P. L 

Orange Co. F. L 

Orange P. L 

Orland P. L 

Oroville P. L 

Oxnard P. L.. 

Pacific Grove P. L 

Palm Springs (Welwood Murray P. L.). 

Palo Alto P. L 

Palo Verde Valley Dist. L 

Palos Verdes L. Dist. L 

Pasadena P. L 

Paso Robles P. L 

Perris P. L- 

Petaluma P. L 

Placentia L. Dist. L 

Placer Co. F. L — 

Plumas Co. F. L 

Pomona P. L 

Porterville P. L 

(Red Bluff) Herbert Kraft P. L 

(Redlands) A. K. Smiley P. L 

Redondo Beach P. L 

Redwood City P. L 

Richmond P. L 

Riverside Co. F. L 

Riverside P. L 

Roseville P. L. 

Sacramento Co. F. L 

Sacramento P. L 

St. Helena P. L 

Salinas P. L 

San Anselmo P. L 

San Benito Co. F. L 

San Bernardino Co. F. L 

San Bernardino P. L 

San Bruno P. L 

San Diego Co. F. L 

San Diego P. L 

San Francisco P. L 

San Jacinto P. L 

San Joaquin Co. F. L 

San Jose P. L 



Volume 57, iro. 1, wii^TEii, 1962 75 

INDEX TO COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL LIBRARY 
SALARY TABLES-Continued 



Library- 


Table 


Library- 


Table 


San Juan Bautista P. L. 


IV 
II 
VI 
VI 

II 

IV 

III 
II 
III 
II 

IV 

II 
II 

VI 
VI 
IV 

VI 
V 

VII 
VII 

II 
II 

VII 
VII 

II 
II 
II 

VII 

* 




VI 






V 


San Luis Obispo Co. F. L 




II 




Stockton P. L 


II 








San Mateo Co. F. L. 


Sutter Co. F. L. 


II 


San Mateo P, L _ 


Tehama Co. F. L 


II 


San Rafael P. L. 




II 






II 


Santa Barbara Co. F. L, 


Tulare Co. F. L 


II 




Tulare P. L 


VI 


Santa Clara Co. F. L 




II 


Santa Clara P. L 


Turlock P. L 


VII 




Ukiah P. L_ 


VII 


Santa Cruz P. L 


Upland P. L. 


VI 










Vacaville Union High Sch. Dist. L 

Vallejo P. L.. 


VI 




IV 




Ventura Co. F. L 


II 




Ventura P. L. 


II 




Vernon P. L 


VII 


Sausalito P. L. - _. 


Visalia P. L... 


VI 




Watsonville P. L .. 


VI 


Shasta Co. F. L 


Welwood Murray P. L. . 


VI 




Whittier P. L... 


V 


Sierra Madre P. L 


Willits P. L 


* 


Signal Hill P. L 


Willows P. L 


* 




Woodland P. L 


VI 


Solano Co. F. L 


Yolo Co. F. L 


II 






VII 




Yreka P. L... 


VII 













' Indicates no report. 



76 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



91 



VII. SALARIES IN MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES— AREAS 

OF LESS THAN 10,000 POPULATION 

(1960 U.S. CENSUS) 

Professional and Nonprofessional Positions — December 1, 1961 



City 



Chief librarian! 



Other librarians' 



Library aides; 
desk attendants 



Pages and 
shelvers 



3350 
480* 
350* 
Affiliated with Butte 

430-510* 

100 

417-507** 



523-670** 

165 

225-300 
209-254t 

782-950** 
358 

340 
310-376** 

341 

462 
250 

420 
165 
231 

350 
295 



603-733 t 



325-535 

150 

300 

4S7-5S5t 

358-436t 
200 



475 
481-S30td 

376t 

336-356t 

475* 
288-356* 

525 

232-252 
385 1 

415-505* e 
412-502* 



Co. 



3300 
1.60 per hr. 



■(1) 433-554** 
(2) 412-527** 

(1) 330-425** 

(2) 1.75-2.25 prhr. 



(1) 35 per mo. 

/(I) 676-821** 

1(1) 505-613** 

I'd)' 320 

1(1) 300 

/(!)" 220 

1(1) 50b 

/(I) 345 

1(3) 1.75 per hr. 



(1) 315 

(i)" 1.25 per hr. 

(1) 100 ■= 

(1) 2.00 per hr. 



(2) 406-492 1 



(1) 255-399 
(1) 135 



(1) 340-414t 
(1) 281-341 1 



(1) 358-395td 
.(1) 341-376td 



(2) 1.90 prhr. t 
(1) 300t 

(i)' 259-320* 

(1) 375 

aV 312t 
•(1) 376-458*0 
(1) 341-415*0 



2.50 per hr. 
1.25 per hr. 

245-285 
1.25 per hr. 

296-360** 

275-353 
244-314 
1.50 per hr. 



1.50 per hr. 
376-458 
325-395 
1.55-1.79 per hr. 



1.25 per hr. 



1.25 per hr. 

246 

231 



'(2) 350-425 
(2) 317-386 
(1) 301-366 

(1) 268-325 

,(4) 1.00-1.50 per hr. 

""" 167 

(2) 254-394t 
(1) 1.50 per hr. 

(3) 1.25 per hr. 
(3) 1.62-1.97 per hr. 



(1) 
(1) 
(1) 

,(1) 
(1) 
(2) 

,(2) 



390 

312 

189 

1.55 per hr. 

295-325 d 

255-310 

220-268 

2.00 per hr. 

pt. time 
1.21-1.31 pr 

hr. pt. time 



(1) 269 1 

,(1) 250 ] 

■ 268-306 1 

1.75 per hr. ] 

(i) '1.25-1.50 per hr.t 

(1) 268-325 1 

(2) 1.40 per hr. / 
(1) 322-392 

(3) 252-307 

(1) 1.38-1.68 per hr. 
(1) 1.25 per hr. 



31.15 perhr. 
1.00 per hr. 



1.00 per hr. 
1.00 per hr. 

220-268 

1.25 per hr. 
1.25 per hr. 

1.00 per hr. 

1.00 per hr. 
(3) 1.05-1.10 perhr 



(3) 1.25 perhr. 



0.75 perhr. 

1.25 per hr. 
(2) 1.00 perhr. 



(3) 1.15 perhr. 



92 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 

VII. SALARIES IN MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES— AREAS 

OF LESS THAN 10,000 POPULATION— Continued 

(1960 U.S. CENSUS) 

Professional and Nonprofessional Positions — December 1, 1961 



City 


Chief librarian' 


Other librarians' 


Library aides; 
desk attendants 


Pages and 
shelvers 




25 

342-SOOt 

206 


(1) 100 

(1) 1.25-2. sot 


— - 


W 1.25 per hr. 


Yorba Linda 

Yreka 





'^ Some of these positions are filled by persons without library school training, who have been appointed to 
professional jobs because of inability to secure library school graduates for salaries available. Some of the 
positions have short schedules of working hours per week. 
* Salary set at discretion of library board. 
** Raise after 6 months, 
t Raise after 12 months. 
» Salary paid by Humboldt Co. F. L. 
•> Plus $1.50 per hour Sunday work. 
<^ Salary recorded for 1960-61 annual report. 
<i When salary at which current appointments can be made is higher than minimum of the established range, 

that appointive salary is listed here as minimum. 
« Also recorded in Stanislaus Co. 



I 



VOLUME '^J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



93 



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Percent- 
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Circula- 
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That Is 


6 




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1-* llO-*CM 1COI/1U10O 
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1 1 l"^ 1 1 1 1 1^ l'^ Icot^ 1 1 I 1 1 1 1^ 1 1 l^J l00-*'*i ! i-l-*tO 


1 


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;^< |oovo |o ; 1-* \ko |voo III', ', , |i^ 1 I |t^ i^oJS ; S<^5i 


Expend- 
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Book- 
mobile 
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Average 
Days 

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to 
Sched- 
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Stops 


t-.t^vo-*iM<tv.r>.t^-*Tt<o-*t^u-iwt^t^t^r^f~.t-~rN.Tt<t^:^t^ooT}<-*-<j<Ti<^i-it^t^TiH 

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Average 
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Week 

in 
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Weekly 


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OOOOOOOOOO lOOOOOOOOOcocoOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO lOOOOvOOOOLOitiLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

Cm'cm"cm"co"cMCO co"rt.-r,-J' 1 CM''-HCM"co''i-rcM- cm-cm" -*-J<"T^^-^-rt''cM'rt''co'--rrt cm"!-!" 




1-ieM 1 1 I^^CMi-^CMcO i I^HCM li-<CMCOT*ito^Ot^OO.-ir^cO'^i-ICM 11 

' ' ' >^ ! ! 1 ' ' ! ! i 1 ! 

1112 & ts >> >• " 






H-l 


1 1 il 1 llj f < 1 IIPI 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1962 



95 



ii-HLn 



It- 01 



lu-ivo 1 1^-* i^or- 






cot— cnvo 



U^QO mvOOOOO 



00 1000 !■* 



O 1 i»Hm 1 p^ rt 00 O <S ■* 



^l-Hl-HrHrtrtrt— IP<P.J 



>-l >-l tM C< i-H .-1 1-H \y-\ 



1 rt rt O) .-H l-H 1-1 <S 



t^t— t— t— I— 0\-^t— t— t— Cn-^^^TjH-^TfH 



icncnr^c4r* 



li-HCStSt-Irt 









c^ ■* -*■*■*<■ 



0«or^c<-).-i'*00\OMo«snmOc 
\ovovovooovooooot~-oo<^c^mc 



t>.t-t— t-iji 



TjHl— 00OT)<T)<.-l,-lTtl 
r-t CI en 1— 1 1-1 CM Cn| T-H 



^e^•^^54^^ |v^vp»>^vpl 



O>-ii-ii-iOOO>-iCTv<l'00l— CJOOVOMS 



OOOOOOOOt— "J-iOVOroooONO 
soOOOoocsoOf-Lnu-iLoOesvocs 






OOQQOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOO 



00000000000000000000000000000000 
— . L.-^,-.,-, ^„^^_ ^_^^..^^ „.„„ i^r-H vo ^ VO tn 

i'ts'.-i' r-T 



l=fc=*5=*:=fe 



a ^ 



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20 iii 



fSU 



S g a - >^c 
S^J o 3 5 o 

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MM MM MM 



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96 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIPORNlA LtBRAiilES 



o 
o 

CO 



u 

LU 



o 

Qi J) 

ii ^ 

LU "^ J3 

U V « 

to — 

Q !^ a 

LU — ' -D 

.=) = 

to a. .ii 

Q. a. 

Qi < c 

I- = .2 

to Z -g 






ID 
I— 

y 

z 
o 



a 
& 
O 
+j 
c 

6 

.& 
'5 

w 


= 1 
a, 


,-.rt 1 IT-I [ ] ir-l r 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ iio Its 1 r 1 1 , 1 1 1 Irt^ 


0- S 


1 rr-H 1 1 ItM Irt 1 Irt li-ltS 1 1 1 Irti-I !,-( 1 lrtr-( 1 1 j'c^ 1 


g 


^1-HM 1 1 iiMcs— 1— 1 Its ie->io 1 1 icnr-10m>-i i i it-^ i i ir^i , 


a, 


_lr-irt,-l 1 ic^rt iT-r im irtcn 1 r ,-( ,-1 ,-1 -* rt ,-H 1 1 ICS 1 1 it^ 1 


Total 
Audience 
(All Film 
Showings) 


lOOO-^t^ ICNLO I^HCVjU-i ly^ONOCO IC^O^HC^r^,— t-- 1 U") C<-5 ^H OO 1 1 

jc^cs ,vO"^,'— < cS|Tt*fo r--J\o t^t^cN Jcot-h ,, 


to 

f2E| 


50 

3,831 

933 

-- 

2,170 

1,072 

4,348 

20 

285 

72 

454 

""Y,007" 

3,873 

31 

1,117 

24 

1,963 

168 

13,570 

34,310 

855 

21 

18 

869" 

398 

92 

"""""l",756" 


No. 

Received 

from Film 

Circuits 


il^Or-' 1 ON f^ tH 00 ON 00 On iOcSOOVO iOcoO iO^OOO ii— 1 i^H lO r 

^0^0^'5t^ 1 On (M 1-4 C^J >-H r- C l C<» O '-^ i— ' l ON -— • ON i ON i— < 'O i C^ lO I 
ic^ 1 csco <si CS n-HCS CS 1 1 ICO 1 luo r 


No. 
Rented or 
Borrowed 

from 

Outside 

Agencies 

(Excluding 

Circuits) 


O-^oo Ico 1 I^ 1 I I-^ 1 it^ ' loor-) 1 1 looco i lOO hj-joo i i 

li-l^O I 1 IT-I 1 1 1 1 It^ 1 t^ON 1 1 l-^r-l 1 It^ lt^,-( 1 1 


Total 

Film 

Titles 

Owned 


iOnon 1 1 i^-^ ion iij^ loot^ 1 1 1^ '^rr* i i i i i i r i i i 

1 1 1 ii— (CS iT-H t 1 r 1 1 icnOn I I I I I ) I t I I 


I'll 

a. 


i^H 1 icNi 1 1 1 1— ( 1 1 1 r^ 1 1 1 I iOn i-— I 1 r 1 1 1 I 1 1 ir-^T-H 

i^ i i" i i i^ i i i°° i i i i i^ i" i i i i i i i i i"" 


J 


i is i i is i i i i:2s i i i i i iss i i i i i°° i i i"^ i 

OO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ir-H 1 1 1 1 1 \ \ \ ] 


r5 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 ! CO lO 1 1 1 1 1 1 

,, 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i<M ICO 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1 1 CO ION 




3 


Alameda 

Alhambra 

Arcadia 

Benicia 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 

Buena Park 

Burbank 

Butte County 

Coalinga 

Eureka 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Hanford 

Huntington Beach 

Lodi 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County 

Madera County 

Merced County 

Monterey 

Napa 

Napa County 

National City 

Ontario 



VOLUME '>,'], NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



97 



rt 1 Irt 1 l,-l 1 Irt 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ImtH 1 ! Irt^TjHCSrt I 1 1 1 l,-l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


llllllrHT(<ll-*|iijirtrtljrtil^rtil^lj|lli^(s|^ij|llll 






50,658 

""8'2",623" 

2,596 

--- 

414,238 

1,139 

57,442 

212,930 

68,667 

1,000 

"'""8"7",6i9" 

34,232 

52,720 

1,197 

'""I's'^ooo' 

134,768 

"""""8",268" 
3,957 

'""3'3',SS3' 
9,587 

"""l"7"2",477" 

29,113 

21,287 

483 

54,120 

73,365 

132,399 

9,840 

3,658 
2,190 

""'""4',S88" 
238,546 


2,059 

""""2",9Si' 
59 

9,038 

36 

922 

3,606 

2,686 

7 

10 

2,497 

792 

1,382 

24 

8 

156 

2,974 

242" 
117 

'"'""l',0i9" 

"""'"5", 722" 
596 
819 

'"'"1^525" 
1,622 
3,073 
538 
---- 

76 

6O" 
111 
5,394 


lONO 1 lO lO lONCS lOcnvO^O ■ 1 ^0\ \t>-7-i \\o 1 I 1 -^ ,— 1 LO ^H LO CO 1-H \o 1 

1-1 [QLO 1 lO ION lr-<tO lr-Hr-)^C\ 1 1 r OO 1 CS C^l 1 .-■ 1 1 1 -^ <N — < rt O t--l Tf CS I l I I 1 l c^l i 
C^ ICN 1 ICO 1 ICSCN r CNCSli— < i l r ,-h i i (N i 1 i ^H CM C<1 CS CS C-^ CS 1 1 


] i^H r r,— lOO 1 1 rioiol^ ■ ^H i r i i vo CO ( i i r On i i i il^ i n^ror--CS i oo O i oo ON O i 
1 \0\ II csi 1 1 it-H 1 111 lu-ivo 1 1 1 iC'l 1 1 1 r 1 ivOcoCn i O -^ i t-h t-h cs i 


1 1 1 1 1 it-s. 1 1 ILO 1 1 1 LO i-H tS CO NO CS CS 1 1 1 ILO ICS 1COCSO 1 CN 0\ NO 1 I rt 1 1 1 1 CO 1 
1 NO 1 1 INO 1 1 IC^ t-H ,-H 00 ON 1 11 


ONlicolloOllcoI'lllllll't^llllOiTHOOoliiiiCOllllllllI 
LOII-^ 11-^1 ICO IIIII-^IIIIO lONNOr^ 1 1 1 1 ILO 1 Ill 


1 1 1 1 1 IM 1 1 lO 1 Tt( 1 i:^ 1 1 llO 1 1 ILOCOTJH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

1 1 1 1 1 ILO 1 1 100 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 ICO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II IVOLO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 11-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1C-) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 lO li-lO 1 1 Its 1 lO tS 1 1 1 ICS 1 1 1 Irt 1 1 1 1 

1 1 1 l<X l^r^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 lO 1 lO 1 t-~ 1 1 1 iNO 1 1 1 ILO 1 1 1 1 

1 1 1 ILO 1 r-i 1 IC-1 1 Its 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l-H^ 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l' 1 1 

1 1 1 ! 1 'i 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 'i 3 ! 1 1 1 1 ! 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 ! 1 1 1 1 

o 

1 1 1 1 ! ! i ! I& ; i^ ! ! ! i 1 1 : ! 1 IS- 1 i ! : 1 1 1 1 1 I 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiioi<3iii°°>iii<iiici!ai>>iii><iiii 
i,iiiJiii|Jiiiiii2igiiig.ai|irtii>,>,,C3i'giii2iiii 
luiiij^iiir^iiiii 1.5 1 o o 1 1.2." i|itHi"J+-j-Mi4JOi5i''5i'ii 
1 > 1 1 1 S 1 I i-ti , 1 1 1 1 n3 iQj o , pj3ja I , 1 CD «." G c i-arj 'S ' ' '3 'o ! ' 

i^lfi^ i 1 ijlil I irmimmt^M iS|l nmA% i 

? y 3 -3 « « g i;'S7,'S > s . u:= ccccdcieBCGcnsd aJS c 3 5 o-a t;-a=3 c S ts^.^S 

OpHPHPH0HPHpHPHKMrtMKMMCQWMWWCOWCOMMM(/DCOWC/3COC«WMMCQHH3>>>l> 



98 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SOUND RECORDNGS IN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC LIBRARIES, 1960-61 
Unit Count Is by Disc or Reel, All Types and Speeds of Recordings 



City or County Library 



Total 
Recordings 



Number 
Added 
During 
Year 



Number 

Withdrawn 

During 

Year 



Total 
Circulation 



Equipment Owned 



Record 
Player 



Alameda 

Alameda County 

Alharabra 

Amador County 

Arcadia 

Berkeley ^ 

Buena Park 

Burbank 

Burlingame 

Butte County 

Calexico 

Chula Vista 

Coalinga 

Contra Costa County. . 

Colton 

Daly City 

EI Centro 

Fresno County 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Hayward 

Hemet 

Kern County 

Lassen County 

Livermore 

Lodi 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County — 

Madera County 

Merced County 

Mill Valley - 

Monrovia 

Monterey 

Monterey County 

Mountain View 

Newport Beach 

Oakland 

Orange 

Orange County 

Orland -- 

Oroville 

Pacific Grove 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Petaluma 

Placer County 

Plumas County 

Pomona 

Porterville 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Sacramento 

Salinas . 

San Bernardino 

San Diego 

San Diego County 

San Jose 

San Joaquin County — 

San Leandro 

San Marino 

San Mateo 

San Mateo County 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara County. 

Santa Cruz County 

Santa Fe Springs 

Santa Maria 

Santa Monica 

Shasta County 

Sierra Madre 

Solano County.. _ 

South San Francisco — 

South Pasadena. 

Stanislaus County 

Tehama County 

Ventura County 

Watsonville 

Whittier 



3,410 

35 
2,815 
8 
1,100 
1,140 
1,956 



1,815 
714 



472 
5,671 
1,075 
1,287 



1,117 
745 

1,349 

2,936 
816 
325 

1,255 

417 

527 

545 

11,022 

3,618 



541 

1,142 

1,672 

3,413 

36 

529 

365 
3,806 

256 



77 
256 
188 
631 

4,104 

364 

76 

463 

2,150 
207 



244 
3,124 

567 
1,443 
8,339 

451 

16,970 

1,766 

15,658 

1,295 

5,004 

281 



3,506 

2,223 

239 

895 

3,641 

847 



1,159 

3,029 

370 

34 

10,381 

1,023 

728 



273 



623 
2 
620 
507 
355 
240 
100 

64 
108 

55 
257 
130 

50 
198 
208 
267 
243 
534 
195 

15 
958 

S3 
190 

60 
840 
393 



94 
182 
240 
173 

36 
529 

79 
361 

56 



14 
108 
114 
316 
572 



40 

50 

542 

72 



522 
470 
114 
179 
474 



364 
216 

72 
276 
494 

25 



721 
97 



206 

538 

184 

2 



277 

289 

64 



1,061 
97 
101 



186 



14,176 



662 



130 

230 

36 



133 
60 



122 
74 

115 
36 
24 
12 



11 

51 

8 

1,690 

12 



1,531 



25 
188 



278 

242 

104 

205 

323 

6 

180 

301 

14 

87 

62 



394 
26 



4 
157 
28 



27,408 



16,889 
21,297 

9,839 
13,039 

6,289 

2,609 
808 

3,077 
14,903 



2,020 

593 

9,574 

13,810 

15,763 

23,641 

17,540 

115 

2,870 

2,377 

9,167 

3,351 

107,941 



9,749 
11,699 
14,753 



130 
8,007 
8,535 
3,102 
10,388 
442 
881 
2,156 



37,405 

842 

754 

3,273 

34,298 

439 

13,502 

35,851 

27,302 



13,476 
20,763 
5,275 
26,876 
14,650 



13,626 
24,851 



15,382 

44,675 

3,232 

793 

13,034 

27,944 

5,993 

63 



4,674 
6,931 



175 
IS 
58 



11,733 
6,145 
6,797 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



99 



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100 



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101 



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CoUe 
nt Gr 
nt Mt 
Mudd 


Poinona CoUei 
Scripps Colleg 
alifornia Instit 
;anford Univer 
niversity of Ca 

Berkeley" 

Davis 

Lajolla 

Los Angeles.. 
Riverside..... 
San Francisco 
Santa Barbarj 
niversity of So 








ssociated 
Claremo 
Claremo 
Harvey 








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104 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



CALIFORNIA JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARIES * 
Annual Statistics, 1960-61 



Name 



Address 



Book 

Fund 

1960- 

61 



Total 
vol- 
umes 



Vol- 
umes 
added 



Period- 
icals re- 
ceived 
cur- 
rently 



Library 
employees 



Prof. 



Non- 
prof. 



Stu- 
dents 



Antelope Valley Jr. College 

Bakersfield College 

California Concordia College .. 

Cerritos College 

Chaff ey College 

Citrus Jr. College 

City College of San Francisco . 

College of San Mateo 

College of the Siskiyous 

Compton District Jr. College.. 

Contra Costa College 

Deep Springs College 

Diablo Valley College 

East Los Angeles College 

El Camino College 

Foothill College 

Fresno City College 

FuUerton Jr. College 

Glendale College 

Hartnell College 

Humphreys College 

Imperial Valley College 

Lassen Jr. College 

Los Angeles City College 

Los Angeles Harbor College 

Los Angeles Metropolitan Col- 
lege of Business 

Los Angeles Pierce College 

Los Angeles Valley College 

Menlo College 

Modesto Jr. College 

Monterey Peninsula College.-. 

Mt. San Antonio College 

Napa College 

Oceanside Carlsbad College 

Orange Coast College 

Palomar College 

Pasadena City College 

Porterville College 

Reedley College 

Sacramento City College 

San Benito College 

San Bernardino Valley College 

San Diego Jr. College 

San Jose City College 

Santa Ana College 

Santa Barbara City College 

Santa Monica City College 

Santa Rosa Jr. College 

Shasta College 

Stockton College 

Vallejo Jr. College 

Yuba College 



Lancaster 

Bakersfield 

Oakland 

Norwalk 

Aha Loma 

Azusa 

San Francisco. - 

San Mateo 

Weed 

Compton 

San Pablo 

Deep Springs.. 

Concord 

Los Angeles 

El Camino Col- 
lege.... ___._ 
Mountain View 

Fresno 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Salinas 

Stockton 

El Centro 

Susanville 

Los Angeles 

Wilmington 

Los Angeles 

Woodland Hills 

Van Nuys 

Menlo Park 

Modesto 

Monterey 

Pomona 

Napa 

Oceanside 

Costa Mesa 

San Marcos 

Pasadena 

Porterville 

Reedley 

Sacramento 

Hollister 

.San Bernardino 

San Diego 

Moorpark 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara. 
Santa Monica.. 

Santa Rosa 

Redding 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Marysville 



57,000 
11,736 
1,525 
20,900 
11,800 
10,100 
12,000 
19,300 
15,000 
7,231 
8,000 
478 
11,810 
12,523 

21,730 
14,240 
11,224 
13,800 

7,594 

10,497 

782 

24,355 

1,276 
38,845 
17,514 

9,678 
30,191 
35,163 
5,373 
10,226 
9,482 
17,500 
5,653 
2,062 
i'10,590 
8,890 
18,349 
8,158 
4,448 
7,200 
3,500 
8,533 
16,427 
b 14,000 
5,800 
9,000 
13,529 
12,519 
6,836 
8,971 
4,014 
5,838 



8,500 
26,041 
10,050 
11,442 
18,355 
14,000 
52,088 
31,187 

4,000 
22,229 
21,464 
11,900 
16,500 
35,311 

30,796 
12,500 
13,646 
26,369 
20,000 
250,016 
6,470 
6,000 
5,169 
95,773 
22,924 

13,042 
28,365 
34,295 
17,383 
40,098 
17,291 
35,264 
12,041 
16,996 
16,574 
24,148 
63,447 

7,393 

8,461 
52,050 

4,000 
38,000 
26,053 
21,000 
26,476 
10,000 
30,125 
28,306 
14,496 
20,202 

7,973 
18,827 



854 
1,823 

225 
2,383 
2,026 
2,000 
1,884 
2,109 
2,000 
1,572 
1,356 
75 
1,313 
3,602 

3,232 
2,939 
1,724 
2,040 
1,255 
1,807 

100 
6,000 

390 
5,406 
2,452 

2,238 
4,533 
7,061 
1,700 
1,451 
1,834 
3,818 
1,070 

639 
1,826 
2,768 
3,827 
1,808 

520 
1,217 
1,000 
1.622 
2,618 
3,000 
1,167 
2,500 
2,931 
2,019 
1,630 
1,629 

506 
1,799 



125 
200 
140 
363 
300 
200 
437 
505 

60 
159 
225 

35 
265 
392 

213 

214 

270 

381 

210 

284 

48 

70 

60 

400 

350 

250 
415 
481 
178 
477 
218 
521 
151 
104 
130 
269 
300 
94 
150 
140 
110 
200 
328 
320 
219 
210 
428 
265 
157 
199 
216 



1.0 
3.0 
1.0 
2.0 
2.0 
1.4 
5.3 
4.8 
1.0 
3.3 
2.0 



3.0 
3.0 

4.0 
5.0 
3.0 
4.0 
2.1 
2.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
7.0 
2.9 

1.4 
2.0 
5.0 
1.0 
5.5 
2.0 
6.7 
1.0 
1.3 
2.3 
1.0 
6.0 
1.0 
1.0 
3.0 
1.0 
3.0 
S.O 
3.0 
2.7 
1.0 
4.0 
2.0 
1.0 
2.9 
1.0 
2.0 



1.0 
4.0 



4.0 
4.0 
2.0 
1.2 

5.8 



2.5 
2.0 



3.0 
6.0 

5.0 
2.0 
4.0 
3.6 
3.0 
3.0 
2.0 



S.O 
3.0 

1.0 
2.0 
6.0 
1.5 
4.5 
2.0 
6.5 
1.2 
1.0 
3.0 
3.5 
4.5 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



2.3 
S.O 
2.0 
1.0 
2.0 
4.0 
2.0 
2.0 
2.3 
1.0 
2.5 



850 
3,862 
82 
4,577 
1,601 
2,797 
4,851 
3,563 

199 
2,246 
3,749 
18 
4,878 
8,747 

9,010 

3,145 

5,135 

4,725 

2,788 

1,162 

461 

844 

283 

21,599 

2,940 

4,003 
='1,469 
7,543 
1,048 
2,721 
2,856 
5,018 
977 
1,781 
3,402 
1,729 
10,081 



1,048 
4,613 
86 
8,471 
6,251 
5,572 
3,316 
1,392 



1,974 
865 
3,564 
3,091 
2,294 



* Statistics compiled from U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Education. LIBRARY 
STATISTICS OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, 19G0-61, pt. 1: INSTITUTIONAL DATA. Washington, 
1962. Published with the permission of the U.S. Office of Education. 

» Excludes enrollment in the evening division. 

^ Includes expenditures for binding. 



CALIFORNIA BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 

' ' There is in the State Government a commission known as the Board 
of Library Examiners, consisting of the State Librarian, who is ex 
officio chairman of the board, the librarian of the public library of the 
City and County of San Francisco, and the librarian of the Los An- 
geles Public Library ..." (Education Code 27251) 

''The board shall pass upon the qualifications of all persons desiring 
to become county librarians ..." (Education Code 27252) 

Members of the Board 

Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, California State Librarian, Chairman 
Harold L. Hamill, Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library 
William R. Holman, Librarian, San Francisco Public Library 

Examination of Candidates 

Dates for the next examination have not yet been determined. Librar- 
ians who may be interested in taking a future examination may obtain 
a list of the Board's regulations and application blank for filing, on 
request to the Chairman. The list of librarians who may be interested 
in taking the examinations is important to the Board in deciding the 
time for holding the nest examination. 

Announcement of the next examination, and application blanks for 
filing, together with the Board's regulations, will be sent to those who 
request them. 

For further information, address the Chairman, Board of Library 
Examiners, Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, California State Library, Sacra- 
mento 9, California. 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIAN CERTIFICATE HOLDERS 
As of March 1, 1962 

Biller, Florence E. ; Library Consultant, California State Library, Sacramento. 
Boyd, Barbara G. ; Lecturer in Library Service, School of Library Service, UCLA, 

Los Angeles. 
Brother, Shirley ; Library Consultant, California State Library, Sacramento. 
Brown, Eleanor Frances ; Librarian, Camas, Washington, Public Library. 
Oasteel, Miriam ; Assistant Librarian, Ventura County Library, Ventura. 
Chadwick, Mrs. Catherine S. ; Librarian, Ventura County Library, Ventura. 
Clark, Patricia J. ; Librarian, San Luis Obispo Public Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Collins, Mrs. Hilda ; Librarian, Tulare County Library, Visalia. 
Cotton, Jane C. ; Librarian, Placer County Library, Auburn. 

Crumb, Mrs. Lois K. ; Librarian, San Luis Obispo County Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Edens, Mrs. Marietta ; Children's Librarian, Ventura County Library, Ventura. 
Ewing, Stephen D. ; Librarian, San Leandro Public Library, San Leandro. 
Fabilli, Josephine ; Supervising Librarian, Los Angeles State College Library, Los 

Angeles 32. 



(105) 



106 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Farrier, George F. ; Librarian, Santa Clara County Library, San Jose. 

Fitch, Mrs. Vera Elder ; Librarian, El Dorado County Library, PlacervUle. 

Fuller, Donald F. ; Supervising Librarian, Santa Clara County Library, San Jose. 

Geller, William S. ; Assistant County Librarian, Los Angeles County Public Library, 
Los Angeles. 

Gerould, Albert C. ; Chief, Central Public Departments, Free Library of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Gilbert, Mrs. Helen Stone ; Librarian, Yakima Valley Regional Library, Yakima, 
Washington. 

Hahn, Frances A. ; Librarian, San Diego County Library, San Diego. 

Hall, Roxie ; Librarian, Calaveras County Library, San Andreas. 

Hamill, Harold L. ; Librarian, Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Hamilton, Carl W. ; Librarian, McHenry Public and Stanislaus County Libraries, 
Modesto. 

Hanna, Alice M. ; Librarian, Kings County Library, Hanford. 

Helium, Mrs. Bertha D. ; Librarian, Contra Costa County Library, 1750 Oak Park 
Boulevard, Pleasant Hill, California. 

Henderson, John D. ; Librarian, Los Angeles County Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Holman, William R. ; Librarian, San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco. 

Hope, Arlene; Principal Librarian, Library Consultant Services, California State 
Library, Sacramento. 

Hughes, M. Virginia ; Library Consultant, California State Library, Sacramento. 

Humphry, John A. ; Director, City Library Association, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Jackson, Edwin G. ; Director, Free Public Library, Trenton, Nevi^ Jersey. 

Jones, Leon I. ; Chief Librarian, Muncie, Indiana, Public Library. 

Klausner, Margaret ; Librarian, Stockton-San Joaquin County Libraries, Stockton. 

Koepp, Donald W. ; Assistant, Bureau of Public Administration Library, University 
of California, Berkeley. 

Koolwyk, Mrs. Lois ; Librarian, Monterey County Library, Salinas. 

Kunkle, Mrs. Hannah J. ; Librarian, Louis Pasteur Junior High School, Los An- 
geles. 

Lake, Albert C. ; Librarian, Riverside County Library, Riverside. 

Leigh, Mrs. Carma Russell ; State Librarian, California State Library, Sacramento. 

Lipney, Mrs. Marjorie ; Reference Librarian, Ventura County Library, Ventura. 

Magee, Mrs. Lois C. ; Supervisor, Adult Extension Department, Kern County Li- 
brary, Bakersfield, California. 

Magladry, George C. ; Librarian, Humboldt County Library, Eureka. 

Mardon, Esther L. ; Librarian, Shasta County Library, Redding. 

Marvin, Marian R. ; Librarian, Merced County Library, Merced. 

Mathisen, Mrs. Alice ; Librarian, Tehama County Library, Red Bluff. 

Metzger, Mrs. Lucille B. ; County Schools Librarian, County Superintendent of 
Schools Office, Santa Cruz. 

Meyer, Ursula ; Librarian, Butte County Library, Oroville. 

Moore, M. Josephine ; Librarian, Plumas County Library, Quincy. 

Morales, Philip ; Librarian, Menlo Park Public Library, Menlo Park. 

Morrison, Mrs. Margaret A. ; Librarian, Orange County Library, 12393 Placentia 
Avenue, Orange, California. 

Murphy, Frances ; Librarian, Sonoma County Library, 2555 Mendocino Avenue, 
Santa Rosa. 

Murray, Arthur B. ; Assistant Librarian, San Diego County Library, San Diego. 

Ossen, Virginia ; Chief Central Services Librarian, Los x^.ngeles County Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 

Palen, Mrs. Oloanne D. ; Assistant Librarian, Marin County Library, San Rafael. 

Pardee, Josephine ; Librarian, North Central Regional Library, Wenatchee, Wash- 
ington. 

Perry, Edvrard Caswell ; Librarian, Burbank Public Library, Burbank. 

Petrella, James A. ; Librarian, Madera County Library, Madera. 

Ragsdale, Robert C. ; Librarian, Solano County Library, Fairfield. 

Ramirez, William L. ; Branch Librarian, San Francisco Public Library, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Reilly, Mrs. Alice P. ; Librarian, Fresno County Library, Fresno. 

Roberts, Mrs. Dorothy F. ; Librarian, Alameda County Library, 224 West Win ton, 
Hayward, California. 



Volume <^'j, no. i, winter, 1962 10? 

Ross, Virginia L. ; Librarian, San Mateo County Library, Belmont. 

Rowe, Harry M., Jr. ; Librarian, Fullerton Public Library, FuUerton. 

Rowe, Howard M. ; Librarian, San Bernardino Public Library, San Bernardino. 

Sanborn, Mrs. Dorothy C. ; City Librarian, Auburn City Library, Auburn. 

Sharafanowich, Walter A. ; Librarian, Alameda City Public Library, Alameda. 

Sinclair, Dorothy ; Head, Adult Services, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Smith, John E. ; Library Adviser, USC School of Public Administration, Karachi 
Pakistan. 

StofEel, Lester L. ; Librarian, Oak Park, Illinois, Public Library. 

Thomas, Mrs. Dorothy M. ; Librarian, Mill Valley Public Library, MiU Valley. 

Thomas, Ritchie D. ; Librarian, Woodland Public Library, Woodland. 

Thompson, Margaret W. ; Librarian, Monterey Peninsula College, Monterey. 

Thorne, Marco G. ; Assistant Librarian, San Diego Public Library, San Diego. 

Traver, Dorothy A. ; Librarian, San Bernardino County Library, San Bernardino. 

Turner, Ruth N. ; Principal Librarian, Reader Services, Contra Costa County Li- 
brary, 1750 Oak Park Boulevard, Pleasant Hill, California. 

Van Home, Bernard ; Departmental Administrative Officer, Contra Costa Countj 
Library, Pleasant Hill. 

Vollmayer, Karl A. ; Librarian, Redwood City Public Library, Redwood City. 

Ward, John M. ; Librarian, Salinas Public Library, Salinas. 

Webster, Helen E. ; Supervisor, Main Branch, Ventura County Library, Ventura. 

Webster, William G. ; Librarian, Hayward Public Library, Hayward. 

Wemmer, Frederick A. ; Librarian, Sacramento County Library, Sacramento. 

Wheeler, Evanne ; Librarian, Amador County Library, Jackson. 

Wilson, Eleanor N. ; Librarian, Kern County Library, Bakersfield. 

Wynn, Barbara L. ; Library Consultant, California State Library, Sacramento. 

At present not in library work: 

Biggins, Albert Joseph ; University of California Press, Berkeley. 

Burket, Frances (Life certificate). 

Cavitt, Mary A. 

Coffman, Mrs. Eleze Butler. 

Dills, Clara B. (Life certificate). 

Galloway, Blanche (Life certificate). 

Gantt, Edith. 

Hadden, Anne (Life certificate) . 

Hupp, Mrs. Faye K. (Life certificate). 

Martin, Lenala A. (Life certificate). 

Morgan, Mrs. Eleanor H. (Life certificate). 

Mulholland, Frederick F. 

Nisbet, Lillian F. 

Reagan, Ida M. (Life certificate). 

Silverthorn, Bessie B. (Life certificate). 

Singletary, Mrs. Elizabeth S. 

Spiller, Mrs. Mildred. 

Topping, Elizabeth (Life certificate). 

Yelland, Mrs. Edna H. (Life certificate). 



108 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LXBRABlEg 



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I 



DIRECTORY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES BY CITIES 

The statistics given in the following directory cover the fiscal year 1960-61, except 

that listings for puilic libraries have been revised to incorporate more recent 

changes in personnel and addresses, ichen known. 
Full statistics for puilic libraries, junior college, college, university, centralized 

school, state prison and correctional school, and State Department of Mental 

Hygiene institutional libraries are included in the preceding tables. These libraries 

have directory listing only, here. 
Statistics for other special libraries and libraries in schools which are not part of a 

centralized school systetn are included here. If no annual report was received for 

1960-61, no statistics are given. 

Facts on special services such as photostat copying, film libraries, etc., availability 
to the public, and interlibrary loan policy are included for special libraries, when 
knoivn. Similar information will be included for college, university, and public 
libraries in the 1963 edition. 

An "Index to Headquarters, Branches and Stations of County Libraries Arranged 
by Place" and an "Index to Names of Libraries" follow the Directory, on pages 
223 and 231, respectively. 

CALIFORNIA 

Area : 156,803 sq. mi. 
Population: 15,717,204* 



ASIN (Modoc Co.) 



BIG VALLEY JOINT 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 



UNION HIGH 



AL TAHOE (Ei Dorado Co.) 

LAKE TAHOE UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. Box 217. 

ALAMEDA (Alameda Co.) 

ALAMEDA FREE LIBRARY. Santa 
Clara at Oak St. Walter A. Shara- 
fanowich, Libn. 

Branches : 2 
Stations : 7 

ALAMEDA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2200 Central Ave. Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth L. Hemrich, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn. 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 15,000 

Total vols : 8,500 ; New 850 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 80 ; Stud : 1,800 ; Grades : 9-12 

ENCINAL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 210 Central Ave. Henrietta 
Pageau, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 15,000 

Total vols : 6,085 ; New : 450 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 40 ; Stud : 900 ; Grades : 9-12 

* U.S. Burea of the Census. U.S. Census 
of population: 1960. Number of in- 
habitants, California. Final report 
PC (1)-6A. U.S. Government Print- 
ing Office, Washington D.C., 1961 

( 



U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION, MAIN 
BARRACKS LIBRARY. Tel: LA 
3-2200. 

ALBANY (Alameda Co.) 

ALBANY FREE LIBRARY. 1216 So- 
lano Ave. Kathleen Watkinson, Libn. 

ALBANY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
603 Key Route Blvd. DeVore Watt, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 
Book fund : $1,800 ; Circ : 25,000 
Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 586 
Subs : Mags : 103 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 50 ; Stud : 978 

U.S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE, 

WESTERN REGIONAL RESEARCH 

LABORATORY. 800 Buchanan St., 

Albany 10. Tel: LA 5-2244, ext. 200. 

Anne M. Avakian, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To serve the research staff of 
the laboratory 

Total vols : 25,000 

New titles : 675 ; VF drawers : 8 

Subs : Mags : 546 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Processing, utiliza- 
tion of agricultural products ; chem- 
istry ; physics ; engineering ; pharma- 
cology 

Expenditures : $7,500 ; Circ : 60,481 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 
109) 



110 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRABIES 



ALHAMBRA (Los Angeles Co.) 

ALHAMBRA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 110. Mrs. M. Schwartz, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,388 ; Cire : 19,000 

Total vols : 14,500 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 90 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades : 9-12 

ALHAMBRA INSTRUCTIONAL MA- 
TERIALS DEPT. 601 N. Garfield. 
Charles Betts, Dir. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

ALHAMBRA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 410 

W. Main St. Mr. Robert C. Goodwell, 
Libn. 

C. F. BRAUN & CO., REFERENCE 
LIBRARY. 1000 South Fremont. Ralph 
K. Hagedorn, Libn. Tel: AT 2-1131. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Purpose : Provide reference and re- 
search materials and services for com- 
pany engineers, scientists and admin- 
istration 

Total vols : 7,500 ; Pams : 6,000 

New title : 600 ; VF drawers : 55 

Subs : Mags : 350 ; Newsp : 4 

Special collections : Petroleums, petro- 
chemicals, materials of construction 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
ized procurement of publication and 
subscriptions 

MARK KEPPEL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 501 E. Hellman. Hope H. 
Brevi/er, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,780 ; Circ : 20,476 
Total vols : 8,966 ; New : 1,419 
Subs : Mags : 126 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 102 ; Stud : 2,337 ; Grades : 10-12 

RAMONA CONVENT HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1700 S. Marengo 

Ave. Sister Mary Michaeline, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1.200 ; Circ : 7,200 

Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 150 

Subs : Mags : 56 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 27 ; Stud : 376 ; Grades : 9-12 



ALLEGHA^9Y (Sies-ra Co.) 

ALLEGHANY HIGH SCHOOL LI 
BRARY. David B. Dickson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-iibn 

Book fund : $200 ; Circ : 200 

Total vols : 400 ; New : 50 

Subs : Mags : 8 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 3 ; Stud : 18 ; Grades : 7-12 



ALTA LOMA (San Bernardino Co.) 

CHAFFEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
6835 Haven Ave. George C. Eiser, 
Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 



ALTADENA (Los Angeles Co.) 

ALTADENA LIBRARY DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. 2366 N. Lake Ave. Mrs. 
Gladys V. Babcock, Libn. 

Branches : 1 



ALTURAS (Modoc Co.) 

MODOC COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
212 W. Third St. Mrs. Betty Malson, 
Libn. 

Serves : entire county 
Outlets : 6 

Stations : Adin, Cedarville, Davis Creek, 
Lookout, Willow Ranch 

MODOC CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

MODOC CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
212 W. Third St. Mrs. Betty L, 
Malson, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

MODOC UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Ken Clapsaddle, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 2 clerks 
Total vols : 5,300 ; New : 200 
Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 17 ; Stud : 325 ; Grades 9-12 



ANAHEIM (Orange Co.) 

ANAHEIM CITY SCHOOLS. 412 E. 
Broadway. William F. Ross, Libn. 

See centralized school lib7-aries table. 

ANAHEIM PUBLIC LIBRARY. 241 
S. Los Angeles St. Mr. William J. 
Griffith, Libn. 
Bookmobile stops : 4 

ANAHEIM UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 811 W. Center St. 

BROOKHURST JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 601 N. Brookhurst Ave. 
Mrs. Ima Vance, Libn. 

DALE JR. HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
900 S. Dale St. Velma Ferraris Bush, 

Staff": 1 libn ; * clerk 

Book fund : $5,000 

Total vols : 1,572 

Subs : Mags : 31 

Fac : 48 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 7-9 



VOLUME lyjj NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



111 



JOHN FREMONT JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 608 W. Center 
St. Dorothy Minnick, Libn. 

MAGNOLIA SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
2705 W. Orange Ave. William D. 
Stocks, Ass't Supt. Helen H. Force, 
Library Coordinator. 

NORTRONICS, SYSTEMS SUP- 
PORT, A DIVISION OF NORTHROP 
CORP., LIBRARY. 500 E. Orange- 
thorpe Ave. Mrs. Gordon S. Wilcox, 
Libn. Tel: LA 5-4771. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 4 clerks 
Purpose : To support the manufacturing 
operation and research and develop- 
ment activities of a government con- 
tractor 
Total vols : 1,200 ; Pams : 6,000 
VF drawers : 35 
Subs : Mags : 146 ; Nevrsp : 1 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : Restricted 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
LIBRARY. 1900 Crescent Ave. Tel: 
KE 3-3141. Mrs. Theresa B. Cham- 
bers, Libn. 

ROBERTSHAW-FULTON CON- 
TROL CO. AERONAUTICAL DIV., 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Santa Ana 
Freeway at Euclid. 

WESTERN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 501 S. Western Ave. Beatrice 
H. Griffin, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 120 ; Stud : 2,700 ; Grades : 10-12 



ANDERSON (Shasta Co.) 

ANDERSON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1471 Ferry St. Robert M. 
Graham, Libn. 

Staff : \ teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,500 

Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 300 

Newsp • 6 

Fac : 36 ; Stud : 800 ; Grades : 9-12 



ANGELS CAMP (Calaveras Co.) 

BRET HARTE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. P.O Box 688. 

CITY OF ANGELS PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. Angels Camp. 



ANGWIN (Napa Co.) 

PACIFIC UNION COLLEGE, W. E. 
NELSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 
Lois J. Walker, Libn. 



Branches or departmental libraries : 
Preparatory school library, elemen- 
tary school library 

fifee slate and other four-year college 
taile. 

ANTIOCH (Contra Costa Co.) 

ANTIOCH JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1500 D St. 

ANTIOCH SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 700 W. 18th St. 

ANTIOCH UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT. 1413 F St. Agnes Bonde, Dir. 
See centralized school libraries taile. 

APPLE VALLEY (San Bernardino Co.) 

APPLE VALLEY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 548. Martha A. 
Quandt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 7,403 

Total vols : 2,252 ; New : 607 

Subs : Mags : 37 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 23 ; Stud : 439 ; Grades : 7-9 

ARBUCKLE (Colusa Co.) 

PIERCE JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mrs. Eleanor Mathews, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Total vols : 2,065 ; New : 232 
Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 14 ; Grades : 9-12 

ARCADIA (Los Angeles Co.) 

ARCADIA DISTRICT LIBRARY. 234 
Campus Dr. Sondra Cohen, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

ARCADIA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
111 W. Duarte. Mrs. Trudie Hunt, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Circ : 24,000 

Total vols : 12,000 ; New : 1,668 

Subs : Mags : 83 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 130 ; Stud : 2,600 ; Grades : 9-12 

ARCADIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 20 W. 
Duarte Rd. Mr. Homer L. Fletcher, 
Libn. 

LOS ANGELES STATE AND 
COUNTY ARBORETUM LIBRARY. 
301 N. Baldwin Ave. Mrs. Russella K. 
McGah, Libn. 

ARCATA (Humboldt Co.) 

ARCATA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1720 N St. Lillian Hagopian, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,817.50 

Total vols : 9,536 ; New : 717 

Subs : Mags : 138 ; Newsp : 7 

Fac : 87 ; Stud : 1,609 ; Grades : 9-12 



112 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



ASIC AT A— Continued 

ARCATA PUBLIC LIBRARY. Cor. 
9th and G Sts. Mrs. Tessa N. Wood, 
Libn. 

Affiliated with : Humboldt County Free 
Library. 

HUMBOLDT STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Helen A. Everett, Libn. 
Departmental libraries : Laboratory 
School Library, Instructional Mate- 
rials Center. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
taMe. 

ARLINGTON (Kaverslds Co.) 

ARLINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 6580 Crest Ave. Jo Ann 
Bailey, Lbn. 

NORTE VISTA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6580 Crest Ave. Jo Ann 
Bailey, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $6,600 : Circ : 22,753 

Total vols : 4,076 ; New : 1,257 

Subs : Mags : 47 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 48 ; Stud : 1,035 ; Grades : 7-9 

ARROYO GRANDE (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

ARROYO GRANDE UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 495 Valley Rd. 

Sara A. Steigerwalt, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $1,726.07 ; Circ : 10.061 

Total vols : 6,758 ; New : 502 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 53 ; Stud : 1,082 ; Grades : 9-12 



ARViN (Kern Co.) 

ARVIN HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
900 Varsity Ave. Kathryn M. Neville, 
Libn. 



ARTESIA (Los Angeles Co.) 

ARTESIA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

12108 E. Del Amo. Mrs. Marjorie P. 

James, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 10,580 

Total vols : 7,115 ; New : 650 

Subs : Mags : 88 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,450 



ASSOCIATED (Contra Costa Co.) 

TIDEWATER ASSOCIATED OIL CO., 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
DEPT. LIBRARY. 



ATASCADE;^0 (San Luis Obispo Co.] 

ATASCADERO STATE HOSPITAL, 
PATIENT LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1026. 
Mrs. Vesta Coke, Libn. Tel: Atasca- 
dero 600. 



Staff : 1 libn ; 9 others 

Purpose : Reading, recreation and study 

for hospital patients only. 
Totals vols : 6,000 
New titles : 450 
Subs : Mags : 19 ; Newsp : 4 
Expenditures : $595 ; Circ : 41,500 

ATASCADERO STATE HOSPITAL, 
PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. P.O. 

Box 1026. Mrs. Vesta Coke, Libn. Tel: 
Atascadero 600. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Purpose : To provide professional read- 
ing and reference service for staff of 
physicians, psychologists, social work- 
ers, rehabilitation therapists, nurses 
and psychiatric technician personnel 
and other employees. 

Total vols : 15,000 ; Pams : 1,500 

New titles : 250 ; VF drawers : 5 

Subs : Mags : 95 

Special collections : Sex psychopathy 
and forensic psvchiatry. 

Expenditures : $3,000 ; Circ : 1,528 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

ATASCADERO UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 727. 

Leah Mahaffay, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 345 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 30 ; Stud ; 520 ; Grades : 9-12 



ATHERTON (San Mateo Co.) 

M E N LO - ATH E RTO N HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Middlefield at 
Oak Grove. Maxine Hegland, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2* clerks 

Book fund : $4,126 ; $1,000 mags ; Circ : 

27.575 
Total vols : 15.000 ; New : 1,275 
Subs : Mags : l90 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 106 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 9-12 

AUBERRY (Fresno Co.) 

SIERRA JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

See under Tollhouse. 



AUBURN (PSacer Co.) 

AUBURN CITY LIBRARY. 175 Al- 
mond St. Mrs. Dorothy C. Sanborn, 
Libn. 

COLLEGE OF OUR LADY OF 
MERCY. Route 3, Box 3216. Sister 
Mary Aquin, Libn. 

DeWITT STATE HOSPITAL LI- 
BRARIES. P.O. Box 192, Tel: TU 5- 
3741. 

Purpose : Medical library for profes- 
sional staff ; patients library for pa- 
tients> 



VOLUME ^y, NO. 1, WINTER, 1 962 



113 



Total vols : 4,188 

Subs : Mags : 198 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Psychiatry, psychol- 
ogy, rehabilitation 

Expenditures: Medical library $2,400; 
Patients library $950 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

PLACER COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
1244 High St. Jane C. Cotton, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Auburn, 
Lincoln, Roseville. 

Contracts with : RoseviUe Public Lib. 

Outlets : 16 

Stations : Applegate, Colfax, County 
Hospital, Dutch Flat, Foresthill, 
Loomis, Meadow Vista, Newcastle, 
Penryn, Rocklin, Tahoe City, Tahoe 
Vista, Weimar. 

PLACER CO. INSTRUCTIONAL MA- 
TERIALS CENTER FOR ALPINE, 
NEVADA, PLACER, SIERRA COS. 
1228 High St. Martin Bauman, Dir. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

PLACER CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

PLACER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 275 Orange St. Katherine 
Kaye, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 15,395 

Total vols : 6,978 ; New : 360 

Subs : Mags : 89 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades 9-12 

AVALON (Los Angeles Co.) 

Avalon, Public Schools. See under Long 
Beach. 



AVENAL (Kings Co.) 

AVENAL HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

601 Mariposa. Mrs. Patricia Nelson, 
Libn. -Clerk. 

REEF-SUNSET UNION ELEMEN- 
TARY SCHOOL DISTRICT. 500 S. 
First Street. 



AZUSA (Los Angeies Co.) 

AZUSA CITY SCHOOLS. 4563 5th St. 
Mary Lewellen, Libn. 

I See centralised school libraries table. 

i AZUSA COLLEGE LIBRARY. Corner 
i of Alosta and Citrus Avenues, Edward 
! Peterman, Libn. 

See State and other Four-Year Colleges 
table. 

AZUSA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1240 N. Ceritos. Reba A. Brown, Libn. 

; Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $8,000 ; Circ : 37,918 
; Total vols : 7,002 ; New : 2,656 
I Subs : Mags : 132 ; Newsp : 6 
I Fac: 82; Stud: 1,980; Grades: 9-12 



AZUSA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 729 N. 
Dalton, Civic Center. Ruth J, Cain, 
Libn. 

CITRUS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 18824 
E. Foothill. Mrs. Aline Crowley, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

CITRUS UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 18824 E. Foothill Blvd. 



BAKERSFIELD (Kern Co.) 

BAKERSFIELD CITY SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. 1600 K St. J. L. Compton, 
Supt. of Schools. 

BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 4021 Mt. Vernon Ave. Mrs. 
Goldie B. Ingles, Libn. 

See California junior college libraries 
table. 

BAKERSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1341 G. St. 

EAST BAKERSFIELD HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2200 Quincy. 
Mrs. Christina M. Mashtaire, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn. ; 2teacher-libn. ; 1 clerk 
Book fund: $3,120; Circ: 23,-355 
Total vols : 10,123 ; New : 1,193 
Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac: 110; Stud: 2,500; Grades: 9-12 

FRESNO STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Bakersfield Center. 4021 Mt. 
Vernon Ave. Harry Walthall, Libn. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

KERN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
1315 Truxton Ave. Eleanor N. Wilson, 
Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Outlets : 170 

Branches : Baker St., Delano, McFar- 
land, Oildale, Shafter. Taft, Wasco 

Stations : Arvin, Arvin Mig. Bakersfield 
College, Belridge, Boron, Boys Camp. 
Buttonwillow, Caliente, California 
City, C.I.M., Campfire Girls, Car- 
neros, Edwards, Fairfax, Fellows, 
Fire Dept. No. 1, Fire Dept. No. 2, 
Fire Dept. No. 3, Fire Dept. No. 4, 
Fire Dept. No. 5, Fire Dept. County, 
Fruitvale, Glennville, Greenfield, Isa- 
bella, .Jameson Camp, .Johannesburg. 
Keene, Kern Gen. Hospital, Kernville. 
Lament, Lost Hills, McKittrick, Mar- 
icopa, Mercy Hospital, Minter, Mo- 
jave, Oil Center, Panama, Randsburg, 
Red Rock, Ridgecrest, Rosamond, 
Stony Brooke, Tehachapi, Tupman, 
Twin Oaks, Virginia Ave., Weldon, 
Wooford, Woody 

Bookmobile stops : 29 

Schools: 82 



114 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



BAKERSFIELD— Continued 

KERN COUNTY GENERAL HOS- 
PITAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 1830 
Flower St. Mrs. Thella Winters, Libn. 
Tel: FA 3-7651, ext. 257. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : An immediate reference for all 

medical personnel in Kern County 
Total vols: 6,700; Pams: 321 
New titles: 300-375; VF drawers: 3 
Subs : Mags : 154 ; Newsp : 2 
Expenditures: $3,200; Circ : 18,341 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

KERN COUNTY HEALTH DEPT. 
LIBRARY. 1700 Flower St. Mrs. 
Doris M. Cary, Libn. Tel: FA 5-5051. 

Staff : 5 

Purpose : Library is maintained as part 
of our in-service training program. 
The books and journals are kept for 
reference purposes also 

Total vols : 879 ; Pams : 4000 

New titles : 20-30 ; VF drawers : 4 

Subs: Mags: 34; Newsp: 2 

Expenditures: $1,600 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

KERN COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 
Room 306, Administration & Courts 
BIdg. Mrs. Else E. Richards, Libn. 

Staff: 2; Income: $15,914 
Circ : 473 

Total vols : 12,947 ; New : 377 
Subs : Mags : 14 ; Newsp : 2 
Open to public for reference only 

KERN CO. TEACHERS PROFES- 
SIONAL LIBRARY. 1315 Truxton. 
Mrs. Martha Allison, Libn. 

KERN CO. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
& JR. COLLEGE DISTRICTS, IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CEN- 
TER. 2000 24th St. Bernice Braddon, 
Libn. 
See centralized school libraries taile. 

NORTH HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Beulah G. Woodruff, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 
Book fund: $3,260; Circ: 66,231 (in- 
cludes pams & mags.) 
Total vols: 6,912; New. 540 
Subs : Mags : 114 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac: 70; Stud: 1,442; Grades: 9-12 

SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1101 Planz Rd. Elinor V. Mohn, Libn. 

Staff 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,820 ; Circ : 20,871 

Total vols : 7,211 ; New : 2,434 

Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 74 ; Stud. 1,551 ; Grades : 9-12 



BALDWIN PARK (Los Angeles Co.) 

Baldwin Park High School Library, see 
under Covina. 



BANNING (Riverside Co.) 

BANNING UNION DISTRICT LI- 
BRARY. 21 W. Nicoiet. Mrs. Dolores 
Smithpeter, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Riverside Co. P. L. 
Branches : 1 

BANNING UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 101 East Nicoiet. Beatrice 
B. Fuller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,-500 

Total vols : 2,900 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac: 25; Stud: 550; Grades: 9-14 

BARSTOW (San Bernardino Co.) 

BARSTOW JUNIOR COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 448 South 1st St. Thomas 
M. Kimball, Libn. 
See junior college libraries table. 

BARSTOW JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 448 S. First St. 

BARSTOW UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. One Campus Way. Helena 

M. Scoffier, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,707.32 ; Circ : 19,601 

Total vols : 7,395 ; New : 724 

Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 82 ; Stud : 1,410 

U.S. ARMY, FORT IRWIN POST LI- 
BRARY. Fort Irwin. Mrs. Jessie R. 

Hooper, Libn, 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Purpose : To provide progressive public 
library type service to all military, 
dependents, and civilian personnel of 
the military community 

Total vols : 9,300 

New titles : 1,150 ; VF drawers : 5 

Subs : Mags : 77 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Military science and 
history 

Expenditures: $3,800; Circ: 38,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Bibliographies ; recordings 
(tape or disc) ; children's reading 
programs throughout the year; great 
books discussion 



BEAUMONT (Riverside Co.) 

BEAUMONT DISTRICT LIBRARY. 
125 E. Eighth St. Helen Clapp, Libn. 
Affiliated with: Riverside Co. P. L. 

BEAUMONT UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 550 E. 6th St. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



115 



BELL GARDENS (Los Angeles Co.) 

Bell Gardens Jr. High School Library. 

See under Monteiello. 

BELLFLOWER (Los Angeles Co.) 

BELLFLOWER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 15301 S. McNab. Mrs. Wyl- 
via Ziskind, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; li clerks 

Book fund : 3,055 

Total vols : 10,308 ; New : 1,489 

Subs: Mags: 85; Newsp : 3 daily; 3 

weekly 
Fac : 81 ; Stud : 1,705 ; Grades : 9-12 

BELLFLOWER UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. 16703 S, Clark 
St. Mrs. Grace E. Dunkley, Supv. of 
Libs. 

WASHINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 9725 E. Jefferson. Mrs. 
Marjorie M. Murphy, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; § clerk 

Circ : 35,038 
Total vols : 4,292 ; New : 967 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 40 ; Stud : 1,135 ; Grades : 7-9 



BELMONT (San Mateo Co.) 

CARLMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Alameda de las Pulgas. 

COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME LI- 
BRARY. Ralston Ave. Sister Mary 
Justine, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

DALMO VICTOR CO., INC. TECH- 
NICAL LIBRARY. 1515 Industrial 
Way. Mary E. Addems, Library clerk. 
Tel: LY 1-1414, ext. 255. 
Staff : 1 

Purpose : To supply engineers with blue- 
prints, technical reports, books, se- 
rials, catalogs, specifications. 
I Total vols : 700 ; Technical reports : 
3,600 
New titles: 50 bks., 1,000 tech. rpts. ; 

Blueprints, catalogs and specs : 44 
Subs: Mags: 120; Newsp: 2 
Special collections : Antenna research 
and design ; electromagnetism ; wave 
propagation 
I Expenditures : $1,500 
I Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
i! braries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

i NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
1 BRARY. Sister Mary Kostka, S.N.D., 
i Libn. 

I Staff : 1 libn 

' Book fund : $1,-500 ; Circ : 5,565 

Total vols : 7,573 ; New : 350 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 3 

Students : 550 ; Grades : 9-12 ; extended 
day 100 



SAN MATEO COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 25 Tower Rd. Virginia L. 
Ross, Libn. 

Serves : entire county except Burlin- 
game, Daly City, Hillsborough, Red- 
wood City, San Bruno, San Mateo, 
South San Francisco 

Contracts with : San Mateo Public Li- 
brary 

Affiliated with : Menlo Park Municipal 
Library 

Outlets : 48 

Branches : Millbrae and San Carlos 

Stations : Atherton, Bayshore, Belmont, 
Brisbane, Colma, El Granada, Fran- 
cisquito, Half Moon Bay, Paeifica, 
Pescadero, Sanatorium, Sanchez, 
Woodside 

Bookmobile stops : 31 

Schools : 8 

BENICIA (Solano Co.) 

BENICIA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Margaret E. Herrmann, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $500 

Total vols : 1,406 ; New : 87 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 22 ; Stud : 427 ; Grades : 9-12 

.BENICIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 144 

East G Street. Mrs. LeNoir Miller, 

Libn. 

Affiliated with : Solano Co. F. L. 



BERKELEY (Alameda Co.) 

ANNA HEAD SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
2538 Channing Way, Berkeley 4. 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
2222 Harold Way. Mrs. A. K. Filip- 
penko, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

BERKELEY BAPTIST DIVINITY 
SCHOOL, Sandford Fleming Library, 
2606 Dwight Way. Ida Pratt, Libn. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
talle. 

BERKELEY COLLEGE WOMEN'S 
CLUB LIBRARY. 2680 Bancroft Way, 
Berkeley 4. 

BERKELEY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Milvia & Kittredge. Mrs. 
Larissa Ruiofson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2^ clerks 

Book fund : $3,000 

Total vols : 18,005 ; New : 1,993 

Subs : Mags : 141 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac: 147; Stud: 3,200; Grades: 10-12 

BERKELEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
2090 Kittredge Street, Berkeley 4. 
Frank Dempsey, Acting Director, Libn. 
Branches : 4 

BURBANK JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1222 University Ave., Berke-. 
ley 7. Jean Imria, Libn. 



116 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEAKIES 



BERKELEY-Continued 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL FOR THE 
DEAF LIBRARY. 2601 Warrinq St. 
Caroline H. Burnes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : .$950 ; Circ : 5,000 

Total vols : 6,250 ; New : 350 

Subs : Mags : 35 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 450 ; Grades : 6-12 

CALIFORNIA STATE SCHOOL FOR 
THE BLIND (EMBOSSED BOOK) 
LIBRARY. 3001 Derby St., Berkeley 5. 

CHEMICAL LIBRARY SERVICE. 20S 
Panoramic Way, Berkeley 4. 

CHURCH DIVINITY SCHOOL OF 
THE PACIFIC LIBRARY. 2451 Ridge 
Road, Berkeley 9. 

GARFIELD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Rose and Grant. Ruth Bel- 
lus, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Circ : 22,515 

Total vols : 9,165 ; New : 780 
Subs : Mags : 87 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 72 ; Stud : 1,520 ; Grades : 7-9 

HEXCEL PRODUCTS, INC. LI- 
BRARY. 2332 Fourth St., Berkeley 10. 

Mrs. Patricia M. Bauer, Libn. Tel: 

TH 3-4664, ext. 290. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Central location of informa- 
tion material and literature searching 

Total vols : 550 

YF drawers : 36 

Subs : Mags : 172 

Expenditures : $1200 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries. 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing & abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions. 

McKINLEY ADULT SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2419 Dwight Way, Berke- 
ley 4. 

NEWMAN HALL LIBRARY. 2630 
Ridge Rd., Berkeley 4. 

PACIFIC LUTHERAN THEOLOGI- 
CAL SEMINARY LIBRARY. 2770 
Marin Ave. Margaret Sihler, Acting 
Libn. 

fiee state and other four-yea}- colleges 
taJjle. 

PACIFIC SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

LIBRARY. 1798 Scenic Ave. Dr. J. 

Stillson Judah, Libn. 

Departmental libraries : Palestine Insti- 
tute. Library. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

ST. MARY'S HIGH SCHOOL COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. De La Salle Hall, 
Peralta Park, Berkeley 6. 



STARR KING SCHOOL FOR THE 
MINISTRY LIBRARY. 2441 Le Conte 
A,v8. Mrs. George F. Patterson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Total vols : 27,719 ; New : 292 
Subs : Mags : 47 ; Newsp ; 5 
Fac : 3 full-time, 4 part-time, Stud : 20 ; 
8 extended day ; Grades : 17-20 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LI- 
BRARY. Berkeley 4. Donald Coney, 
University Libn. 

The University Library, Berkeley cam- 
pus, comprises the General Library 
(Main Library and 19 branch li- 
braries) and several departmental li- 
braries. 

Branch libraries : Architecture, Arthur 
"Waugh, Libn ; Art-Anthropology, Rob- 
ert Pfeiffer, Libn ; Astronomy-Mathe- 
matics-Statistics, Mrs. Audrey Adams, 
Libn ; Biochemistry, Mrs. Georgianne 
Titus, Libn ; Biology Library, Eva 
Olson, Libn ; Chemistry, Mrs. Georgi- 
anne Titus, Libn ; City and Regional 
Planning, Holway Jones, Libn ; Earth 
Sciences, Robert Takagi, Libn ; East 
Asiatic, Dr. Elizabeth Huff, Libn; 
Education, Elizabeth Bantz, Libn ; 
Engineering, Mrs. Blanche Dalton, 
Libn ; Entomology, Mrs. Aileen Jaffa, 
Libn ; Forestry, Mary Eakin, Libn ; 
Landscape Architecture, Arthur 
Waugh, Libn ; Library School, Geral- 
dine Clayton, Libn ; Music, Dr. Vin- 
cent Duckies, Libn ; Optometry, Eva 
Olson, Libn ; Physics, Mrs. Georgi- 
anne Titus, Libn ; Public Health, 
Louise Eastland, Libn 

For statistics of other University's li- 
braries see under their location : Los 
Angeles ; Davis ; Richmond ; River- 
side ; Goleta (Santa Barbara) ; Lick 
Observatory, Mount Hamilton ; U.C. 
Medical Center, San Francisco ; Hast- 
ings College of Law, San Francisco 

BANCROFT LIBRARY. Main 



Library, Berkeley 4. George P. Ham- 
mond, Director. 

BUREAU OF PUBLIC AD- 



MINISTRATION LIBRARY. 348 Li- 
brary Annex, Berkeley 4. Tel: TH 
5-6000, ext. 3420. Barbara J. Hudson, 
Libn. 

Staff : 6 libns ; 10 others 
Purpose : Serves Bureau of Public Ad- j 
ministration research staff ; campus 
faculty and students ; governmental 
agencies ; off-campus organizations and 
individuals. 
Pams : 3.52,600 

New Titles : 7,300 ; VF drawers : 8 
Special collections : Administration, 
planning, finance and taxation, wel- 
fare, criminology, housing, personnel 
transportation, local, state and federal 
government, election statistics and 
campaign material. 
Expenditures : $2,050 ; Circ : 20,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



117 



Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; fur- 
nishes a duplicate set of subject cata- 
log cards to the State Library. 

GARRET W. McENERNEY 



SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. Ban- 
croft Way and College Ave. Dan F. 
Henke, Libn. 

Staff : 9 ; Income : $40,000 
Total vols : 153,462 ; New : 8,254 
Subs : Mags : 1,967 
Open to public for referenec only 
Remarks : Permanent depository for 
briefs of the Supreme Court of the 
United States commencing with 299 
U.S. (1936) 

GIANNINI FOUNDAT?ON OF 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS LI- 
BRARY. 248 Giannini Hall, Berkeley 
4. Tel: TH 5-6000, ext. 3347. Mary L. 
Eakin, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libns 

Total vols : 10,472 

New Titles : 401 ; VF drawers : 386 

Subs : Mags : 623 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : none 

Services : Bibliographies ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions 



— RADIATION LABORATORY 

LIBRARY. Room 134, BIdg. 50. Robert 
S. Meyer, Libn. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSfOri, 



CONTINUING EDUCATION OFTHE 
BAR LIBRARY. 2161 Shattuck Ave., 
Berkeley 4. Francis Gates, Libn. 

WILLARD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Ward and Telegraph, Berke- 
ley 5. Maxine Vincent, Libn. 



BEVERLY HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) 

BEVERLY HILLS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 205 S. Rexford Dr. Lois C. 
Burmester, Libn. 

BEVERLY HILLS PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 450 No. Crescent Dr. Lura 
B. Wallace, Libn. 

IbevERLY HILLS UNIFIED 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 255 S. Rexford 
I Dr.; Hazel S. Vaughan, Libn. 

ISee centralized school libraries talle. 



BIEBER (Lassen Co.) 

iBIG VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
iBRARY. P.O. Box H. Norman Smith, 
Libn, 



BIG BEAR LAKE 
(San Bernardino Co.) 

BIG BEAR HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box W. 



BSGGS (Butte Co.) 

BIGGS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 216 B St. 
Mrs. Hazel B. Linford, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Butte Co. Lib. 



BIG PINE (Inyo Co.) 

BIG PINE UNIFIED SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 500 S. Main. 

BISHOP (Inyo Co.) 

BISHOP UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 301 N. Fowler. Mrs. Kathleen 
M. Wonacott, Libn. 

Staff : i teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 5,325 
Total vols : 3,500 ; New : 607 
Subs : Mags : 39 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 23 ; Stud : 445 ; Grades : 9-12 

BLYTHE (Riverside Co.) 

BLYTHE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
667 N. Lovekin. Mrs. Blanche Moore, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 830 

Subs : Mags : 93 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 30 ; Grades : 9-12 

PALO VERDE JUNIOR COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 615 E. Hobsonway. Mrs. 
Ann Heater, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

PALO VERDE VALLEY DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. 125 W. Chanslorway. Mrs. 
Exabee B. Waggoner, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 
Stations : 2 

PALO VERDE VALLEY UNIFIED 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 667 N. 
Lovekin. 



BOONVILLE (Mendocino Co.) 

ANDERSON VALLEY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box B. 
Mrs. Lenn B. Tuck, Libn. 



BORON (Kern Co.) 

BORON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
26831 Prospect. Mrs. Helen Taylor, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Total vols : 1,500 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 28 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 16 ; Stud : 325 ; Grades : 7-12 



118 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBEAEIES 



BRAWLEY (Imperial Co.) 

BRAWLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Eleanor Heimark, Libn. 

BRAWLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. North Imperial. Henry 
Parris, Libn. 



BREA (Orange Co.) 

BREA-OLINDA UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 803 E. Birch St. 

UNION OIL COMPANY RESEARCH 
LIBRARY. Box 218. 



BRENTWOOD (Contra Costa Co.) 

LIBERTY UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 850 Second St. Elizabeth 
Soderstrom, Libn. 

Staff : 2 teacher-libns 

Book fund : $2,400 

Total vols : 4,900 ; New : 557 

Subs : Mags : 42 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 35 ; Stud : 660 ; Grades : 9-12 



BRIDGEPORT (Mono Co.) 

MONO CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. Therese R. Mosere, Co- 
ordinator, instructional Materials. 

^yIONo CO. teachers library. 

Courthouse. 



BUENA PARK (Orange Co.) 

BUENA PARK LIBRARY DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. 6692 Beach Blvd., P.O. Box 
267. Mrs. Marie Callaway, Libn. 

Branches : 1 
Bookmobile stops : 185 
Schools : 11 

NUTRILITE PRODUCTS, INC. LI- 
BRARY. 5600 Beach Blvd. Tel: LA 
1-3900. H. B. McWilliams, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Pui'i ose : Information center for tech- 
nical and management personnel. 

Total vols : 2,060 ; Pams : 1,000 

New titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 12 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Complete collection 
of Chemical Alstracts from 1907 (first 
year of publication) 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries. 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
film library ; centralized procurement 
of publications and subscriptions. 



BURBANK (Los Angeles Co.) 

BURBANK ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS. 245 E. Magnolia. Eva A. 
Riecks, Supv. 

BURBANK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 902 N. Third. Mrs. Joseph M. 
Salvage, Libn. 

BURBANK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 425 
E. Olive. Edw^ard C. Perry, Libn. 
Branches: 3 

DAVID STARR JORDAN JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 420 S. Mariposa 

JOHN BURROUGHS SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1920 Clark. Mil- 
dred B. Sawner, Libn. 

JOHN MUIR JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1111 N. Kenneth Rd. 

LOCKHEED-CALIFORNIA COM- 
PANY, ENGINEERING LIBRARY. A 
Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corp. 
Dept. 72-25, BIdg. 63-1, Plant A-1. 
Marion L. Stute, Libn. 
Staff : 3 libns ; 10 others 
Purpose : To keep company personnel 
informed of technical research and 
development advances in various sub- 
ject fields in which they are inter- 
Total vols : 11,000 ; Rpts & Docs : 76,000 
New titles : 6,500 
Subs : Mags : 234 
Special collections : Aeronautics 
Circ : 51,000 
Available to : Co. staff 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests. 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions. 

LUTHER BURBANK JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3700 W. Jeffries. 
Helen M. Houston, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,440 

Total vols : 8,900 ; New : 460 

Subs : Mags : 43 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 58 ; Stud : 1,330 ; Grades 7-9 

TECHNICOLOR CORP., RESEARCH 
LIBRARY. 280O W. Olive. Tel: VI 
9-2495. Mrs. Betty R. Tarr, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : Acquire and maintain publi- 
cations relating to research work for 
Technicolor Corp. Provide reference 
service and translations (limited) for 
research staff and other company de- 
partments upon request. 

Total vols : 2,590 ; Pams : 1,750 

VF drawers : 32 

Subs : Mags : 100 

Special collections : Photography, phys- 
ics, electronics, chemistry 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest. 



VOLUME '^'J, NO, I, WINTER, 1962 



119 



VILLA CABRIN! ACADEMY HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 750O Glenoaks 
Blvd. Mother Alacoque, M.S.C., Libn. 

State : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,424.19 ; Circ : 1,726 
Total vols : 5,647 ; New : 961 
Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac : 17 ; Stud : 125 ; 35 extended day ; 
Grades : 9-12 

WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS LI- 
BRARY. 500 S. Buena Vista. Tel: VI 
9-3411. Mrs. Koneta Roxby, Libn. 

Stafe : 3 libns ; 2 others 

Purpose : To supply information and 
pictorial reference for the production 
of motion pictures 

Total vols : 14,175 

VF drawers : 84 

Subs : Mags : 127 ; Newsp : 3 

Special collections : Cartoons and jokes 

Circ : 21,280 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting. 

WARNER BROS. PICTURES, INC., 
RESEARCH DEPT. LIBRARY. 



BURLINGAME (San Mafeo Co.) 

BURLINGAME PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
1269 Beilevue Ave. George P. Lechich, 
Libn. 
Branches : 1 

BURLINGAME HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Carolan Ave. 

BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT 
(LESTER D. HENDERSON LI- 
BRARY). 701 Paioma Ave. Mrs. Mil- 
dred K. Burklow, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries tahle. 

CALIFORNIA TEACHERS ASSOCI- 
ATION. RESEARCH INFORMA- 
CENTER LIBRARY. 1705 Murchison 
Dr. Tel: OX 7-1400. Mrs. Anne T. 
Protopopoff, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 
Purpose : Primarily educational research 
information for staff. Also serves the 
membership and some public. Main- 
tains clearinghouse of educational re- 
search projects carried on in Califoi*- 
nia schools for use of school districts, 
colleges, universities and professional 
organizations. 
Total vols : 1,786 ; Pams : 7,000 
New titles : 204 
Subs : Mags : 115 

Special collections : School administra- 
tion : finance, legislation, personnel 
policies, professional standards, 
school-community relations ; Califor- 
nia education history ; education re- 
search in California. 



Expenditures : $1,000 

Available to : Membership, affiliates & 
staff, other libraries and public by 
referral 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

MERCY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
2300 Adeline Dr. Sister M. Ernest, 
Libn. 

CALEXiCO (Impee-ial Co.) 

CALEXICO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 420 
Heber. Robert F. Huffman, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Imperial Co. F. L. 

CALEXICO UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Box 792. Mrs. Margurite 
C. Atwood, Libn. 



CALiPATRSA (IsnperiaS Co.) 

CALIPATRIA UNIFIED HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Bin G. Mary E. 
Sherry, Libn. 

Staif : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $600 

Total vols : 3,000 ; News : 175 

Subs : Mags : 15 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 15 ; Stud : 200 ; Grades 9-12 



CALISTOGA (Napa Co.) 

CALISTOGA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Lake St. Caroline B. 
Velasquez, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,500 

Total vols : 1,600 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 19 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 14 ; Stud : 180 ; Grades : 9-12 

CALISTOGA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
1401 Cedar St. Mrs. Edith McGill, 
Libn. 

CAMARiLLO (Ventura Co.) 

ADOLFO CAMARILLO HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box 37. Frank 
J. Arnich, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book funds : $5,000 ; Circ : 8,650 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 1,453 

Subs : Mags : 53 ; Newsp : 8 

Fac : 53 ; Stud : 1,243 ; Grades : 9-12 

CAMARILLO STATE HOSPITAL 
LIBRARY. Camarilio. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

Somis Rd. Rev. Francis D. Pansini, 

Libn. 

Departmental libraries : Edward L. Do- 

heny Memorial Library. 
See State and other Four-Year Colleges 

tahle. 



120 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



CAMBRiA (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

COAST JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. Drawer "D". Amado Rey- 

nosa, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teaclier-libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 1,500 

Total vols : 1,709 ; New : 172 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 11 ; Stud : 180 ; Grades : 9-12 



CAMPBELL (Seinta Clara Co.) 

CAMPBELL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1 W. Campbell Ave. Mrs. 
Janet Randall, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 200 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : S3 ; Stud : 2,300 ; Grades : 9-12 

CAMPBELL UNION SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT. 155 N. Third St. Mrs. Elaine 
J. Hendricks, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



ROSEMARY SCHOOL 
401 N. Hamilton Ave. 



LIBRARY. 



CAMPO (San Diego Co.) 



SCHOOL Ll- 
98. Henry J. 



MT. EMPIRE HIGH 

BRARY. P. O. Box 

Heyot, Jr., Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 800 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 200 

Subs : Mags : 15 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 16 ; Stud : 300 ; Grades : 9-12 



CAMPTONVILLE (Yolo Co.) 

CAMPTONVILLE UNION SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 



CANOGA PARK (Los Angeles Co.) 

ATOMICS INTERNATIONALTECH- 
NICAL LIBRARY. 8900 De Soto Ave. 
Tel: Dl 1-1000, ext. 262. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 18 others 

Purpose : To serve the personnel of 
Atomics International 

Total vols : 10,000 ; Pams : 1,200 

New Titles : 20,000 

Subs : Mags : 450 

Special collections : AEG literature spe- 
cializing in nuclear energy : chemistry, 
physics, metallurgy, mathematics, en- 
gineering 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

CANOGA PARK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6850 Topanga Canyon Blvd. 

JOHN A. SUTTER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 7330 Winnetka 
Ave. 



RAMO-WOOLDRIDGE LIBRARY, A 
DIVISION OF THOMPSON, INC. 
8433 Fallbrook Ave. Tel: Dl 6-6000. 
Harvey T. Johnson, Libn. 



CARLSBAD (San Diego Co.) 

CARLSBAD CITY LIBRARY. 601 
Elm St., Mrs. Richard G. Cole, Libn. 

CARLSBAD UNION SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT. 801 Pine Ave. June Jones, 
Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 



CARMEL (Monterey Co.) 



CARMEL HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Highway and Ocean Ave. Nellie J. 
Ryder, Libn. 

HARRISON MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 
Ocean and Lincoln, Box 800. Mrs. 
Ruth Galvin Thornburg, Libn. 



CARM9CHAEL (Sacramento Co.) 

LA SIERRA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5330 Gibbons Dr.; A. L. Neale, 
Libn. 



CARPINTERIA (Santa Barbara Co.) 

CARPINTERIA JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL. Eighth and Walnut. 

CARPINTERIA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Carpinteria Avenue. Mar- 
jorie Holmes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 2,700 

Total vols : $1,800 ; New : 200 

Subs : Mags : 26 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 400 ; Grades : 9-12 



CARUTHERS (Fresno Co.) 

CARUTHERS UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 7. G. 

Douglas Palmer, Libn. 

Staff : 7 teacher-libns 

Book fund : $750 ; Circ : 3,000 

Total vols : 3,000 

Subs : Mags : 15 

Fac : 20 ; Stud : 400 ; Grades : 9-12 



CASTRO VALLEY (Alameda Co.) 

CASTRO VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 16400 Santa Maria. Harry 
E. Dunivan, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 12,000 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 42 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 102 ; Stud ; 2,252 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



121 



eEDARVILLE (Modoc Co.) 

SURPRISE VALLEY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Dale E. Jones, 
Libn. 

CERES (Stanislaus Co.) 

CERES UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mary W. Honeyfield, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,450 

Total vols : 4,991 ; New : 1,420 

Subs : Mags : 117 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 36 ; Stud : 860 ; Grades : 9-12 



CHATSWORTH (Los Angeles Co.) 

WM. T. AGGELER HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 21050 Plummer St. J. 
Richmond, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $60 
Total vols : 40 ; New : 20 
Subs : Mags : 5 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 7 ; Grades : 7-12 



CHICO (Butte Co.) 

BIDWELL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2376 North Ave. Mrs. Helen 
Lantis, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,200 ; Circ : 17,008 
Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 635 
Subs : Mags : 56 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 32 ; Stud : 750 ; Grades : 7-9 

CHICO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 280 Memorial Way. Virginia 
L. Edmiston, Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 17,520 
Total vols : 5,353 ; New : 695 
Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 48 ; Stud : 1,110 ; Grades : 7-9 

CHICO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2nd and 
Salem Sts. Mrs. Dorothy D. Ingalls, 
Libn. 

CHICO SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. The Esplanade. Vaientina 
Nielsen, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 

Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 9,218 
Total vols : 8,536 ; New : 605 
Subs : Mags : 98 ; Newsp. 3 
Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades : 10-12 

CHICO STATE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
East First St. Norris A. Bleyhl, Libn. 

i| Departmental Libraries: (5) Reserve 
Book Room, Natural and Applied Sci- 
ences, Education and Psychology, So- 
cial Sciences and Business, Human- 
ities. 
See State and other four-year colleges 
talle. 



CHINA LAKE (Kern Co.) 

CHINA LAKE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. Gail P. Browne, 
Libn. 

SHERMAN E. BURROUGHS HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Naval Ordnance 
Test Station. 

U.S. NAVAL ORDNANCE TEST 
STATION LIBRARY. Tel: 7-1495. 
Ruth A. Ohler, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 4 others 

Purpose : To serve the military and ci- 
vilian personnel of the Station. 

Total vols : 20,7-52 

New titles : 1,300 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 97 ; Newsp : 15 

Circ : 73,199 

Available to : Co. Staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Tel: Rl 5- 
0111, ext. 71604. Mrs. Carolyn J. 
Kruse, Libn. 

Staff : 10 libns ; 12 others 

Purpose : To provide technical library 
services for the scientists, engineers, 
and other employees of the Station. 

Total vols : 57,000 ; Pams : 105,000 

New titles : 7,000 

Subs : Mags : 730 

Special collections : Rockets, guided 
missiles, explosives, aircraft fire con- 
trol, propellants. 

Expenditures : $60,000 ; Circ : 45,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries. 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted. 

Services : Centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions. 



CHSNO (S$sn Bernardino Co.) 

BOYS REPUBLIC SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Henry Azhderian, Libn. 

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION FOR 

MEN. LIBRARY. Abe Oppenheim, 

Libn. 

Purpose : To service inmates and staff 
of the California Institution for Men. 

Expenditures : $2,100 

Interlibrary loan : No loans 

Services : Literature searching : bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
large scale distribution of magazines. 

See also State prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 

CHINO HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

5472 Park Place. Elodia Solis, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Totals vols : 1,800 ; New : 650 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 49 ; Stud : 1,032 ; Grades : 10-12 

CHINO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 600 Riverside Dr. 



122 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES 



CHOWCKBLLA (Madera Co.) 

CHOWCHILLA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Humboldt St., Box 997. 
Gladys Caywood, Libn. 



CHULA ViSTA (Setn Diego Co.) 

CASTLE PARK JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 160 Quintald. Mrs. Kathryn 
Kcrkis, Libn. 

Staif : 1 teacher-libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $14,347 ; Circ : 17.000 
Total vols : 5,300 ; New : 1,135 
Subs : Mags : 55 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 48 ; Stud : 1,331 ; Grades : 7-9 

CHULA VISTA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 820 Fourth St. Barbara May- 
field, Libn. 

CHULA VISTA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 415 Fifth Ave. 

CHULA VISTA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Memorial Way. Mrs. Janice L. Stew- 
art, Libn. 

SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 888 Fourth Ave. Ward 
Blanchard, Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries table. 



CSTRUS HE3GHTS (Sacramento Co.) 

SAN JUAN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 7551 Greenback Lane. 



CLAREMONT (Los Angeles Co.) 

ASSOCIATED COLLEGES AT 
CLAREMONT. HONNOLD LI- 
BRARY. Dr. David W. Davies, Libn. 

Note : The combined library for four of 
the Associated Colleges at Claremont 
(Claremont Graduate School, Clare- 
mont Men's College, Harvey Mudd 
College, and Pomona College, and also 
serving Scripps College). 

See California universities table. 

CLAREMONT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mountain and Harrison 

Sts. 

CLAREMONT SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Foothill and Indian Hills 
Bivds. Mrs. Mary E. Blanchard, Libn. 

THE FRANCIS BACON FOUNDA- 
TION, INC., THE FRANCIS BACON 
LIBRARY. 655 N. Dartmouth Ave. 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Wrigley, Libn. Tel: 
NA 4-6305. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 
Purpose : To provide research and ref- 
erence materials for studies in the 
Elizabethan and Jacobean period of 
English history and literature with 
special reference to the life and works 
of Francis Bacon 



Total vols : 5,000 ; Pams : 1,000 

New titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Special Bacon col- 
lection with autograph letters and 
documents of 16th and 17th century ; 
early cryptographic collection, 16tli 
and 17th century Emblem books ; 
early Rosicrucian section ; Dante col- 
lection 

Expenditures : $2,000 

Circ : reference only 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest ; most books are in rare cate- 
gory and are loaned to other libraries 
for reference only. 

RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC 
GARDEN LIBRARY. 1500 N. College. 
Mrs. Alice M. Munz, Libn. 

SCRIPPS COLLEGE LIBRARY. Ella 
Strong Denison Library Bldg. Dorothy 
M. Drake, Libn. 

Serves : Associated Colleges, Claremont 

also 
See California universities table. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCHOOL 
OF THEOLOGY LIBRARY. 1325 N. 
College Ave. Rev. Elton E. Shell, Libn. 

Branches : Methodist Historical Society, 
5250 Santa Monica Ave., Los Angeles 
29 ; Pastoral Counseling Center Li- 
brary, 500 E. Colorado St., Pasadena 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

WEBB SCHOOL OF CALIFORNIA. 
625 E. Baseline. Mrs. John S. Iversen, 
Jr., Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 4,250 
Total vols : 8,375 ; New : 230 
Subs : Mags : 29 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac: 20; 4 part-time; Stud: 25; 153 
boarding ; Grades : 8-12 

CLARKSBURG (Yolo Co.) 

CLARKSBURG HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 



CLOVERDALE (Sonoma Co.) 

CLOVERDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
119 West St. Mrs. Pat Henry, Libn. 

Contracts with : Sonoma Co. F. L. 

CLOVERDALE UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 



CLOVIS (Fresno Co.) 

CLOVIS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
901 Fifth St. Kathleen Boling, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 3,660 ; New 350 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME '>,'], NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



123 



COACHELLA (Riverside Co.) 

COACHELLA CITY LIBRARY. 
Hall. Mrs. Wilma Roggero, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 



City 



COACHELLA VALLEY UNION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 56th and 
Van Buren. 



COLUSA CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Included in Co. F. L. 

COLUSA FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

260 Sixtin St. Mrs. Eunice Dollings, 

Libn. 

Affiliated with : Colusa Co. F. L. 



COLUS.A 
LIBRARY. 



UNION HIGH 
745 Tenth St. 



SCHOOL 



COALINGA (Fresno Co.) 

COALINGA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
300 Cherry Lane. Mrs. Sarah C. Bow- 
ers, Libn. 

See Junior College Lihraries table. 

COALINGA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Baker St. Robert E. Philips, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; ^ clerk 
Book fund: $1,000; Circ : 16,000 
Total vols : 6,500 
Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 21 ; Stud : 475 ; extended day : 20 ; 
Grades : 7-9 

COALINGA SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 750 Van Ness Ave. 

COALINGA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. Fourth and 
Durian St. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Moore, 
Libn. 

Branches : 1 
Stations : 5 



COLTON (Sstn Bernardino Co.) 

COLTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 380 N. 
Eighth St. Mrs. Lucy H. Adolina, Act- 
ing Libn. 

Affiliated with : San Bernardino Co. 
F. L. 



HIGH SCHOOL 
I St. Mrs. Minnie 



COLTON UNION 

LIBRARY. 777 W. 

P. Bishop, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; J teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,200 ; Circ : 13,125 

Total vols : 9,285 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 145 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 95 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades : 9-12 



COLUSA (Colusa Co.) 

COLUSA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
546 Jay St. Mrs. ina A. Cousins, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Affiliated with : Colusa P. L. 

Outlets : 21 

Stations: Arbuckle, College City, 

Grimes, Ladoga, Maxwell, Princeton, 

Stonyford, Williams. 
Schools : 11 

COLUSA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 



COMMIRCE (Los Angeles Co.) 

CITY OF COMMERCE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 5001 E. Washington Blvd., 
L.A. Phyllis A. Gray, Libn. 
Established .July 1, 1961 



CCNiVlQH (Los Angeies Co.) 

CENTENNIAL SR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 2606 North Central. Rubye 

M. Taylor, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,200 

Total vols : 4,670 ; New : 263 

Subs : Mags : 61 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 61 ; Stud : 1,450 ; Grades 10-12 

CLARETIAN SEMINARY LIBRARY. 
18127 £0, Alameda Blvd. Rev. J. J. 
Fessler, C.M.F., Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $400 ; Circ : 1,000 
Totals vols : 7,000 ; New : 150 
Subs : Mags : 7 ; Newsp : 5 
Grades : 9-12 

COMPTON COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
1111 East Artesia Blvd. Lloyd R. De 
Garmo, Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries table 

COMPTON SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 601 8. Artesia St. 

ENTERPRISE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY, 2600 W. Compton Blvd. 
(Mrs.) Grace B. Sweeney, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Rook fund : $1,200 

Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 400 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 50 ; Stud : 1,200 ; Grades 7-9 

MANUAL DOMINGUEZ HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY, 15301 San Jose. 
Frances T. Moore, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,000 

Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 750 

Rubs : Mags : 64 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 59 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades 10-12 

PARAMOUNT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 14708 S. Paramount Blvd., 
Paramount. 

PARAMOUNT SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 14429 S. Downey Ave., 
Paramount. 



124 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



COMPTON— Continued 

RALPH BUNCHE JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 12338 Mona. Jo 
Ann Wysocki, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $1,800 ; Circ : 15,000 
Total vols : 4,276 ; New : 717 
Subs: Mags: 57; Newsp : 1 
Fac: 37; Stud: 1,000; Grades: 7-9 

ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1200 E. Alondra Blvd. Mrs. 
Loucile Heckman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund: $1,500; Circ: 20,000 

Total vols : 8,870 ; New : 990 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 52 ; Stud : 1,200 ; Grades : 7-9 

WALTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 900 W. Greenleaf Dr. 

WHALEY JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 14401 S. Gibson. Mrs. Mar- 
jorie Freeman, Libn. 

WILLOWBROOK JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2601 N. Wil- 
mington Ave. Mrs. Mercedes M. Tay- 
lor, Libn. 



COMCORD (Contra Costa Co.) 

CLAYTON VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1101 Alberta Way. Jack 
Ferrari, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $8,143 

Total vols : 7,280 ; New : 2,261 

Subs : Mags : 81 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 79 ; Stud : 1,731 ; Grades : 9-12 

DIABLO VALLEY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Golf Links Road. Thomas B. 
Murray, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries taile 

MT. DIABLO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Grant Si. Ethel Brubaker, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,373 ; Circ : 480 per week 

Total vols : 14,213 ; New : 991 

Subs : Mags : 142 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 91 ; Stud : 1,858 ; Grades 9-12 

MT. DIABLO UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 2701 Willow Pass Rd. 
Thelma C. Dahlin, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table 



CORCORAN (Kings Co.) 

CORCORAN UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY, Whitley and Letts Aves. 

COR!>^lNG (Tehama Co.) 

CORNING PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Contracts with : Tehama Co. F. L. 

CORNING UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Box 407 



CORONA (Riverside Co.) 

CORONA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Main and Olive. Ruth C. 
Irons, Libn. 

CORONA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 805 

Main St. Mrs. Helen M. Wilkins, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 

CORONA SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10th & Lincoln. Florence 
Powell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,600 ; Circ : 12,177 

Total vols : 7,419 ; New : 435 

Subs : Mags : 61 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 945 ; Grades : 10-12 

U.S. NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORA- 
TORY LIBRARY. Tel: RE 7-1800. 
Virginia L. Parker, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 3 others 

Purpose : To service the Laboratory 

Total vols : 7,463 ; Documents : 20,750 

New titles : 400 

Subs : Mags : 400 ; Newsp : 3 

Special collections : Physics, chemistry, 
mathematics, electronics, etc. 

Expenditures : $17,000 ; Circ : 26,880 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature ; bibliographies ; 
photostat copying ; centralized pro- 
curement of publications and sub- 
scriptions. 

CORONADO (San Diego Co.) 

CORONADO ELEMENTARY & JR. 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 650 E. 
Ave. Anita M. Gillett, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 38,743 

Total vols : 14,008 ; New : 1,200 

Subs : Mags : 54 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,700 ; Grades : K-8 

CORONADO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 650 D. Avenue. Marguerite 
A. Bruce, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 118 ; Newsp : 2 

Grades : 9-12 

CORONADO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 640 
Orange Ave. Merna J. Cox, Libn. 

U.S. NAVAL AMPHIBIOUS BASE 
LIBRARY. Coronado, San Diego 55. 
Elizabeth D. Weisgerber, Libn. 

COSTA MESA (Orange Co.) 

COSTA MESA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2650 Fairview Rd. Mrs. Mar- 
ian L. Singley, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 21,750 

Total vols : 5,800 ; New : 1,350 

Subs : Mags : 41 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 108 ; Stud : 2,365 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



125 



FAIRVIEW STATE HOSPITAL, 
MEDICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1000. 
Tel: Kl 5-9331. Mrs. Phyllis H. Smith, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : Provides reference, biblio- 
graphic, and other library for the ben- 
efit of the hospital staff 

Total vols : 1,050 

New titles : 450 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Mental deficiency, 
psychiatry, neurology. 

Espenditures : $2,500 ; Cire : 2,537 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

ORANGE COAST COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 2701 Fairview Rd. Ramona 
T. Case, Libn. 

Departmental libraries : Agriculture, 
Business Education, Electronics, Pe- 
troleum 

See junior college libraries table. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 2525 Newport Blvd. 
Keith C. Lee, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table 

COTATI (Sonoma Co.) 

SONOMA STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. A. S. Pickett, Libn, 

COURTLAND (Sacramento Co.) 

COURTLAND JOINT UNION HIGH 
iSCHOOL LIBRARY. 

COVELO (Mendoeino Co.) 

ROUND VALLEY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Walter D. Wey- 
mouth, Libn. 

COVINA (Los Angeles Co.) 

BALDWIN PARK HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3900 N. Puente, Baldwin 

iPark (Covina city schools). A. Goss- 

jman, Libn. 

i Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 
Book fund: $2,600; Circ: 14,875 

i Total vols : 8,000 
Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,800 ; Grades : 9-12 

CALIFORNIA BAPTIST THEOLOG- 
llCAL SEMINARY. Seminary KnoMs. 
Genevieve Kelly, Libn. 

.See state and other four-year colleges 
table 

CHARTER OAK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 20300 Covina Blvd. Mrs. 
Frances Herner, Libn. 

Staff: llibn; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,000 ; Circ ; 16,796 

Total vols : 4,615 ; New : 1,492 

Subs : Mags : 78 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac: 50; Stud: 1,065; Grades: 9-12 



COVINA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

463 Hoilenbeck. Mrs. Marion Cohee, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 31,482 

Total vols : 11,990 ; New : 1,051 

Subs : Mags : 155 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,784 ; Grades : 9-12 

COVINA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 234 N. 
Second St. Mrs. Dorothy Weeding, 
Libn. 

COVINA UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 463 S. Hoilenbeck St. 

EDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1625 W. Durness St., West 
Covina. Wilma Bennett, Libn. 

NORTHVIEW HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1016 W. Cypress. Mrs. Gene 
Lewis, Libn. 
Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $10,000 ; Circ : 14,720 
Total vols : 4,530 ; New : 2,901 
Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 44 ; Stud : 850 ; Grades : 9-12 

WEST COVINA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1609 E. Cameron. Mrs. Si- 
mone Monteverde, Libn. 

CRESCENT CITY (Del Norte Co.) 

CRESCENT CITY PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 450 H St. Mrs. Edna Cadra, 
Libn. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1301 El Dorado. 

Theodore Rich, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,500 

Total vols : 5,200 ; New : 1,218 

Subs : Mags : 86 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 50 ; Stud : 1,000 ; Grades : 9-12 

DEL NORTE CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

DEL NORTE CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Harland McDonald, Co. Supt. 

CROCKETT (Contra Costa Co.) 

JOHN SWETT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Pomona Avenue. 
Ardis Edwards Burton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,800 

Total vols : 4,700 ; New : 300 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 600 ; Grades : 9-12 

CULVER CITY (Los Angeles Co.) 

CULVER CITY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4601 Elenda. Mrs. Mildred 
Scott, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 18,204 

Total vols : 6,501 ; New : 770 

Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,620 ; Grades : 7-9 



126 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LrBRAEIBS 



CULVER CITY— Continued 

CULVER CITY UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DIST. ELEM. LIBRARY. 4034 Irving 
Place. Walter L. Whitaker, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries taile 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT CO., CULVER 
CITY LIBRARY. Florence and Teale 
St. Fred E. Farhat, Libn. 

M-G-M RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 10202 Washington Blvd. Tel: 
UP 0-3311, ext. 1474. Elliott Morgan, 
Libn. 

Staff: : 4 libns ; 4 others 

Total vols : 15,000 

New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 488 

Subs : Mags : 87 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Architecture, inte- 
rior decoration, painting, costume, old 
trade catalogs, social life and customs, 
illustrated periodicals 

Expenditures : $3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying ; briefing and abstract- 
ing ; general reference 

DALY CITY (San Mateo Co.) 

DALY CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 275 
Southgate Ave. Samuel C. Chandler, 
Libn. 
Branches : 1 

JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6996 Mission. Angela F. Bel- 
lante, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 8,000 

Total vols : 8,100 ; New : 612 

Subs : Mags : 82 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,287 ; Grades : 9-12 

DANVSLLE (Contra Costa Co.) 

SAN RAMON VALLEY UNION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. Shirley 
M. Roen, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 4,260 ; New : 478 
Subs : Mags : 34 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 51 ; Stud : 1,025 

DAVIS (Yolo Co.) 

DAVIS SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 315 W. 14th. Ethlyn F. Hall, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,675 ; Circ : 10,546 

Total vols : 4,350 ; New : 520 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 24 ; Stud : 388 ; Grades : 10-12 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 

DAVIS. LIBRARY. J. Richard Bian- 

chard, Libn. 

Branch libraries : Dept. of Agricultural 
Economics, Mrs. Carolyn E,. Christen- 
sen, Libn ; School of Veterinary Medi- 
cine, Merjan Merala, Libn. 



DEEP SPRINGS (Inyo Co.) 

DEEP SPRINGS COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Via Dyer, Nevada. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 



DELANO (Kern Co.) 

DELANO JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1331 Cecil Ave. James L. 

Hickey, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,200 ; Circ : 10,865 

Total vols : 6,152 ; New : 660 

Subs : Mags : 103 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 66 ; Stud : 1,350 ; Grades : 9-12 



DEL PASO HEIGHTS (Sacramento Co.) 

DEL PASO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1221 South Ave. Mrs. June 
E. Hammond, Libn. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $400-$450 ; Circ : 17,000 

Total vols : 3,800 ; New : 208 

Subs : Mags : 33 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 36 ; Grades : 7-9 

GRANT UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DIST., CURRICULUM LABORA- 
TORY. 1400 Grand Ave. Mrs. Laura 
M. Kuper, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

GRANT UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1400 Grand Ave. Madeline J. 
Cole, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 
Circ : 16,790 

Subs : Mags : 84 ; Newsp : 5 
Grades : 10-12 

DENAIR (Stanislaus Co.) 

DENAIR UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 138. 

DINUBA (Tulare Co.) 

DINUBA JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Kern and College. Mrs. 
Margaret E. Finley, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $900 ; Circ : 7,800 

Total vols : 6,085 ; New : 287 

Subs : Mags : 86 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 31 ; Stud : 635 ; Grades : 9-12 

WASHINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mrs. Ruth Leitzke, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $750 

Total vols : 3,300 ; New : 250 

Subs : Mags : 23 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 14 ; Stud : 350 ; Grades : 7-8 

DIXON (Solano Co.) 

DIXON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DIST. LIBRARY. 135 E. B. Mrs. Jean 
Woodman, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Solano Co. F. L. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, "WINTER, 1 962 



127 



DORRiS (Siskiyou Co.) 

BUTTE VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. Third St. Marlyn Hines, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Total vols : 2,000 ; New : 450 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 9 ; Stud : 125 ; Grades : 9-12 



DOS PALOS (Merced Co.) 

DOS PALOS JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Christine 
Hale, Libn. 



DOWNEY (Los Angeles Co.) 

AEROJET-GENERAL CORP., ENGI- 
NEERING LIBRARY. 11711 Woodruff 
Ave. Tel: TO 1-9711, Ext. 630. Flor- 
ence Walsh, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 4 others 

Purpose : Technical and research ma- 
terials 

Total vols : 1,200 ; Pams : 12,000 

Subs : Mags : 105 

Special collections : Government and 
company specifications 

Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : 60,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

luterlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
: quests 

IdOWNEY city LIBRARY. 8490 
■Third St. Lester J. Bergsiien, Libn. 

DOWNEY SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1104O Brookshire Ave. Cath- 
arine Carpenter, Libn. 

i Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
iBook fund : $3,800 ; Circ : 17,209 
'! Total vols : 7,772 ; New : 1,157 
Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 91 ; Stud : 1,950 ; Grades : 10-12 

iDOWNEY UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERI- 
lALS CENTER. 9140 Brookshire Ave. 
Howard Kaston, Libn. 

pee centralized school libraries table. 

DOWNEY WEST JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL. 11985 Old River Rd. Mrs. 
Dorothy Isom, Libn. 

EARL WARREN SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 8141 E. De Palma. 

InORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, 
SPACE AND INFORMATION SYS- 
TEMS DIV., TECHNICAL INFOR- 
'MATION CENTER LIBRARY. 12214 
Lakewood Blvd. Tel: TO 1-2251, Ext. 
13755. Lee M. Foster, Libn. 
Staff : 5 libns ; 9 others 
Purpose : A divisional service function ; 

technical information in Aero Space 

subject field 
(Total vols : 10,000 



New titles : 750-900 ; VF drawers : 70 

Subs : Mags : 250 

Expenditures : $15,000 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscrip- 
tions 

NORTH JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9633 Tweedy Lane. Faye L. 
Williams, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 11,144 

Total vols : 6,458 ; New : 558 

Subs : Mags : 70 

Fac : 42 ; Stud : 1,100 ; Grades : 7-9 

RHEEM MANUFACTURING CO. 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
LABORATORY LIBRARY. 9236 E. 
Hall Rd. 

SOUTH JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 12500 Birchdale. 



DOWNIEVILLE (Sierra Co.) 

SIERRA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

SIERRA CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Box 37, Loyalton. 

DUNSMUiR (Sislciyou Co.) 



DUNSMUIR JOINT 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 



UNION HIGH 



DURHAM (Butte Co.) 

DURHAM HIGH SCHOOL LI 
BRARY. P.O. Box 140. 



EAST NICOLAUS (Sutter Co.) 

EAST NICHOLAUS JT. UN. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 95. 
Mrs. Lawrence Darrach, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $370 

Total vols : 1,400 ; New : 90 

Subs : Mags : 11 

Fac : 12 ; Stud : 175 ; Grades : 9-12 



EDWARDS (Kern Co.) 

DESERT JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 77. Mrs. Marion 
D. Barnes, Libn. 



EDWARDS FIELD (Kern Co.) 

U.S. EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE 
LIBRARY. 



5—54336 



128 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



EDWARDS FIELD-Continued 

FLIGHT TEST CENTER TECHNI- 
CAL LIBRARY BRANCH. 



EL CAJON (San Diego Co.) 

CAJON VALLEY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 395 Ballantyne Lane. 

Shirley L. Keyes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Circ : 1,350 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 33 ; Grades : 7-9 

CAJON VALLEY UNION SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 750 E. Main Si. Mary R. 
Long, Dir. 
See centralized school lihraries taile. 

EL CAJON VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1035 Madison St. 



EL CAMINO COLLEGE (Los Angeles Co.) 

EL CAMINO COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
16007 S. Crenshaw Blvd. Helen E. 
Rodgers, Libn. 
See Junior College Lihraries taile. 



EL CENTRO (Smperia! Co.) 

CENTRAL UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
AND IMPERIAL VALLEY COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 1001 Brighton. Mrs. 
Violet Gering, Libn. 

EL CENTRO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

539 State St. Mrs. Romaine R. Magee, 
Libn. 

EL CENTRO SCHOOL DISTRICT, 
TEACHERS PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. 640 State St. Mrs. L. Bu- 
chanan, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 939 Main St. Mrs. Violet M. 
Thompson, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Brawley 
and Bl Centre 

Affiliated with : Calexico Public Library 
and Imperial Public Library 

Outlets : 30 

Stations : Calipatria, Holtville, Magno- 
lia, Seeley, Westmorland, Winter- 
haven 

Schools : 21 

Teachers Professional Library 

IMPERIAL COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. Mrs. Loretta 
DouII, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Total vols : 8,330 ; New : 130 

Serves : Open to the public 

IMPERIAL CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. El Centre. 



EL CERRITO (Contra Costa Co.) 

EL CERRITO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Ashberry & Eureka. Mrs. 
Marie Nelson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 part-time clerk 
Book fund : $2,385.16 ; Circ : 10,920 
Total vols : 7,918 
Subs : Mags : 138 ; Newsp : 9 
Fac : 80 ; Stud : 1,786 

WESTERN BAPTIST BIBLE COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 1800 Elm St. Eve- 
lyn Haynes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 2 lib clerks 
Book fund : $481.80 ; Circ : 3,369 
Total vols : 15,166 ; New : 643 
Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 16 ; Stud : 227 ; Grades : 13-16 



EL MONTE (Los Angeles Co.) 

ARROYO HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

4921 N. Cedar. Mrs. Frances Gafuert, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund: $2,195.78; Circ: 190 per 

day 
Total vols : 3,655 ; New : 1,028 
Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 86 ; Stud : 2,128 ; Grades : 9-12 

EL MONTE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 712 S. Tyler Ave. Willa M. 
Sherwood, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,615; Circ : 31,667 
Total vols : 18,313 ; New : 700 
Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 77 ; Stud : 1,842 ; Grades : 9-12 

ROSEMEAD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9063 E. Mission Dr. (EI 
Monte city school) Cosette Anderson, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,767 ; Circ : 34,638 
Total vols : 11,000 ; New : 700 
Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,800 ; Grades : 9-12 



EL SEGUNDO (Los Angeles Co.) 

EL SEGUNDO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 640 Main St. Mrs. Katharine 
Martin, Libn. 

EL SEGUNDO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
608 Richmond St. Dorothea Fitz- 
gerald, Libn. 



ELDRIDGE (Sonoma Co.) 

SONOMA STATE HOSPITAL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 1400. Vera M. 
Barrnes, Libn. 

See state department of mental hy- 
giene — institutional libraries table. 



VOLUME 'yj, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



129 



ELK GROVE (Ssaeramenfs Co.) 

ELK GROVE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 



ELSINORE (Riverside Co.) 

ELSINORE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 400 

W. Graham. Mrs. Altha M. Cauch, 

Libn. 

Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 

ELSINORE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1201 W. Graham. Mrs. 
Katharine B. Keller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Bools fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 18 ; Stud : 400 ; Grades : 9-12 



EMERYVILLE (Aiamecia Co.) 

EMERY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

4727 San Pablo Ave. Mrs. Bernece B. 

Lyon, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 4,800 ; New : 478 

Subs : Mags : 78 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 43 ; Grades : 7-12 

SHELL DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY LIBRARY. 4560 Horton St. 
Thelma Hoffman, Libn. 



ENCENETAS (San Diego Co.) 

SAN DIEGUITO UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Elizabeth 
F. Leonard, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $200 ; Circ : 2,500 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 200 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 950 ; Grades : 10-12 

iSCALON (San Joeaquin Co.) 

ESCALON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Kern and Yosemite. 

ESCONDiDO (San Diego Co.) 

ESCONDIDO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 239 
So. Kallmia. Mrs. Martha H. Roick, 
Libn. 

IeSCONDIDO UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1550 N. Broadway. Edwin 

!C. Mirise, Libn. 

(Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,600 

Total vols : 5,954 ; New : 851 

IjSubs : Mags : 115 ; Newsp : 8 

jFac : 120 ; Stud : 2,430 ; Grades : 9-12 

ESPARTO (Yolo Co.) 

pSPARTO UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 



EThSA (Siskiyou Co.) 

ETNA FREE LIBRARY. Box 15. Mrs. 
Millie Sethman, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Siskiyou Co. F. L. 

ETNA UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 468. Mrs. Carl VV. Black, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 4,448 

Total vols : 2,600 ; New : 461 

Subs : Mags : 41 ; Newsp : 1 

Faculty : 9 ; Stud : 220 ; Grades : 7-12 

EUREKA (Humboldt Co.) 

EUREKA CITY LIBRARY. 7th and F 
Sts. Mrs. Helen B. Murie, Libn. 

EUREKA JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 1915 J St. Jeanne Aasen, 

Libn. 

Staff : 2 teacher-libns. 

Circ : 24,214 

Total vols : 7,734 ; New : 400 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 1 

Faculty : 48 ; Stud : 1,105 ; Grades 7-9 

EUREKA SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2029 J St. Mathilde de Ber- 
nard!, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,400 ; Circ : 20,518 

Total vols : 12,441 ; Nev/ : 463 

Subs : Mags : 155 ; Newsp : 5 

Faculty : 75 ; Stud : 1,526 ; Grades 10-12 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. George Magladry, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Eureka. 

Affiliated with : Areata Public Library 
and Ferndale Public Library 

Outlets : 145 

Stations : Alderpoint, Bayside, Blocks- 
burg, Blue Lake, Crannell, Ettersburg, 
Fieldbrook, Fort Seward, Fortuna, 
Garberville, Glendale, Harris, Honey- 
dew, Hoopa, Hydesville, Korbel, Lo- 
leta, Orleans, Petrolia, Rio Dell, 
Samoa, Scotia, Shively, Trinidad, 
Willow Creek 

Bookmobile stops : 46 

Schools : 71 

Teachers Professional Library 

HUMBOLDT CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

HUMBOLDT CO. MEDICAL ASSO- 
CIATION LIBRARY. City Library 
BIdg. 

'■ii\'SBOLDT CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. 

EXlTiR (f ulesre Co.) 

EXETER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 820 San Juan Ave. Myriam 

F. Partridqe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $2,006 

Total vols : 6,541 ; New : 47 

Subs : Mags : 56 ; Newsp : 4 

Faculty : 38 ; Stud : 700 ; Grades : 9-12 



130 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



FAIRFIELD (Solano Co.) 

ARMIJO UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box B. F. H. LaPlante, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3,000 
Total vols : 3,500 ; New : 750 
Subs : Mags : 70 

Faculty: 62: Stud: 1,250; extended 
day 300 ; Grades : 9-12 

SOLANO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Union Ave. at Texas St. Robert C. 
Ragsdale, Libn. 

Serves : entire county except Vallejo 
Affiliated witb : Benicia, Dixon U.H.S. 

Dist. and Vacaville U.H.S. Dist. 
Outlets : 180 
Branches : Fairfield 
Stations : Kaiser Hospital, Rio Yista, 

Welfare Dept. 
Bookmobile stops : 90 
Schools : 60 

SOLANO COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. Helen E. Reynolds, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Total vols : 8,800 ; New : 227 

Subs : Mags : 20 

Open to public 

SOLANO CO, TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Included in Co. F.L. 

U.S. MITCHELL MEMORIAL LI- 
BRARY. Travis Ave., Travis AFB. 



FALLBROOK (San Diego Co.) 

FALLBROOK SCHOOL DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. 405 W. Fallbrook St., P.O. 
Box 368. 

FALLBROOK UNION HIGH 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 368. Mary E. 
Boyd, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 20,785 

Total vols : 5,250 ; New : 276 

Subs : Mags : 118 ; Newsp : 7 

Faculty : 32 ; Stud : 707 ; Grades 9-12 



FELTGN (Sanfa Cruz Co.) 

SAN LORENZO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 247. 



Ff RNDALE (Humboldt Co.) 

FERNDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 807 

Main St. Mrs. Frances Haywood, Libn. 
Afllliated with: Humboldt Co. Free Li- 
brary 

FERNDALE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. M. Swanson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $600 

Total vols : 1,855 ; New : 126 

Subs : Mags : 18 ; Newsp : 2 

Faculty : 13 ; Stud : 195 ; Grades 9-12 



FILLMORE (Ventura Co.) 

FILLMORE UNION JR.-SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Central Ave. 
Mrs. Dulcie B. Arnold, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,050 ; Circ : 41,743 

Total vols : 10,421 ; New : 789 

Subs : Mags : 136 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 56 ; Stud : 980 ; Grades : 7-12 



FOLSOM (Sacramento Co.) 

FOLSOM SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 715 Riley. Lillian Culver, 
Libn. 

Staff: 1 teacher-libn; 1 clerk 
Circ: 10,304 

Total vols: 4,340; New: 268 
Subs: Mags: 26; Newsp: 4 
Fac: 36; Stud; 700; Grades 10-12 



FONTANA (Son Bernardino Co.) 

FONTANA DEPT. OF INSTRUC- 
TIONAL MATERIAL. 9680 Citrus 
Ave. Geraldine Miller, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table 

FONTANA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1425 Arrow Carolyn Sherrer, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $3,400 ; Circ : 18,000 

Total vols : 4,500 ; New : 300 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 41 ; Stud : 925 ; Grades : 7-9 

FONTANA SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9453 Citrus. Jane Kothman, 
Libn. 

KAISER STEEL CORPORATION 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 217. Tel: VA 2- 
3311, ext. 787. Mrs. W. L. Smith, Co- 
ordinator. 

Staff : 2 

Purpose : Metallurgical research and 
management training 

Total vols : 1,800 

New titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 28 

Subs : Mags : 40 

Special collections : Ferrous metallurgy ; 
industrial supervision and manage- 
ment 

Expenditures : $1,200 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying 

SEQUOIA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9452 Hemlock. Mrs. Marion 
Wheeler, Libn. 



FORT BRAGG (Mendocino Co.) 

FORT BRAGG JR.-SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 500 Harold St. 
Mrs. Lois Hawk, Libn. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 1, WINTER, 1 962 



131 



FORT BRAGG PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Daisy Dodge, Libn. 



FORT ORD (Monterey Co.) 

U.S. ARMY. FORT ORD LIBRARY 

SYSTEM. Nellie McAlpine, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 9 others 
Purpose : To provide progressive public 
library type service to all military, de- 
pendents and civilian personnel of the 
military community. 
Total vols : 16,300 ; Pams : 464 
New titles : 1,700 ; VF drawers : 4 
Subs : Mags : 110 ; Newsp : 8 
Expenditures: $10,500; Circ: 284,827 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; recordings (tape or disc) 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions ; bookmobile 
service 



DURHAM BRANCH LI- 
BRARY. Mary T. Britt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : To provide progressive public 
library type service to all military, 
dependents, and civilian personnel of 
the military community 

Total vols: 4,300; Pams: 240 

New titles : 950 ; VF drawers : 1 

Subs : Mags : 39 ; Newsp. 8 

Special collections : Military science, 
contemporary military reading list 

Expenditures : $5,000 ; Circ : 80,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; record- 
ings (tape or disc) 

HOSPITAL BRANCH LI- 
BRARY. Dorothy Topham, Libn. 
Staff: 1 libn; 1 other 

Purpose : Bibliotherapy with patients 
and general information material and 
recreational reading for patients ; pro- 
fessional staff; attached military per- 
sonnel, their dependents and civilians 
employed 
Total vols: 8,000; Pams: 400; Paper- 
backs : 700 
New titles : 900 ; VF drawers : 1 
Subs : Mags : 58 ; Newsp : 8 
Special collections : Military affairs 
Expenditures : $4,845 ; Circ : 84,416 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Services: Recordings (tape or disc) 



FORT ORD LIBRARY SYSTEM. 
PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY 

BRANCH. Presidio of Monterey. 
Margaret Halstead, libn. 

\See listing under MONTEREY (Mon- 
I terey Co.) 



FORTUNA (Humboldt Co.) 

FORTUNA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 13th & Sandy Prairie. 

FOWLER (Fresno Co.) 

FOWLER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 667. Mrs. Doro- 
thy J. Hergenroeder, Libn. 

FISEDERtCKSBURG (Alpine Co.) 

ALPINE CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Fredericksburg, Calif., via Gardner- 
ville, Nevada. Mabel C. Love, Co. Supt. 

FREM0^9T (AEameda Co.) 

WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 887. Wanda Underhill, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 2,200 

Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac: 103; Stud: 2,377; Grades: 9-12 

FRENCH CAMP (San Joaquin Co.) 

SAN JOAQUIN GENERAL HOSPI- 
TAL SCHOOL OF NURSING LI- 
BRARY. Box 1890. Tel: HOward 4- 
7651. 

FRESNEO (Fresno Co.) 

ADDAMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2117 W. McKinley. Mr. Wil- 
liam Putier, Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $600 
Total vols : 1,300 ; New : 150 
Subs : Mags : 12 
Fac : 12 ; Stud : 20O ; Grades : 7-9 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 102 E. Clinton, 
Mary H. McKay, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $750 

Total vols : 4,000 

Subs : Mags : 65 

Fac : 39 ; Stud : 1,096 ; Grades : 7-9 

BULLARD UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 5445 Palm Ave. 

CENTRAL UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2045 N. Dickenson. Evelyn 
D. Denton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $900 

Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 77 

Fac : 44 ; Stud : 900 ; Grades : 9-12 

DeWOLF HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1921 N. Calaveras. Josephine Hinck- 
ley, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $480 

Total vols : 700 ; New : 160 

Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 9 ; Stud : 230 ; Grades : 10-12 



132 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



FRESNO— Continued 

FORT MILLER JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LiBRARY. 1302 Dakota. Ruth D. de 

Munyon, Libn. 

Staff: : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,500 

Total vols : 4,800 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 29 ; Stud : 1,066 ; Grades : 7-9 

FRESNO BEE EDITORIAL LI- 
BRARY. 1559 Van Ness Ave. 

FRESNO CENTRAL LIBRARY. 221 
S. Angus. Mrs. Prisciila Phillips, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table 

FRESNO CITY COLLEGE LIBRARY, 
1101 University Ave. J. C. Carty, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table 

FRESNO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
2420 Mariposa St., Fresno 21. Mrs. 
Alice F. Reilly, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Coalinga 
Union High School District 

Outlets: 41 

Branches : Clovis, Gillis, North Fresno, 
Reedley, Sanger, Selma, Sierra Vista. 

Stations : Auberry, Big Creek, Big 
Creek No. 2, Biola. Calwa, Caruthers, 
Chavi^anakee, Del Rey, Easton, Farm 
Advisor, Firebaugh, Fowler, Giant 
Club, Industrial Farm, Juvenile Hall, 
Kerman, Kingsburg, Kings River, 
Laton, Mendota, Miramonte, Mon- 
mouth, Navelencia, Oleander, Orange 
Cove. Pariler, Pinedale, Raisin, Riv- 
erdale, San Joaquin, Tranquillity, Tu- 
berculosis Hospital, "West Fresno 

FRESNO CO. LAW LiBRARY. 1502 
Security Bank BIdg., 1060 Fulton St., 
Fresno 21. Mrs. Arline C. Matheron, 
Libn. 

FRESNO CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 

2314 Mariposa, Fresno 21. Virginia C. 

Quesenberry, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table 

FRESNO CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
FRESNO SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1839 Echo Ave., Fresno 3. 

FRESNO STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Henry Miller Madden, Ph.D., 
Libn. 

See State and other four-year Colleges 
table 

GENERAL HOSPITAL OF FRESNO 
COUNTY, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 445 
S. Cedar Ave., Fresno 2. Mrs. Lucille 
L. Buccieri, Libn. Tel: CL 5-9711, 
ext. 284. 
Staff : 1 

Purpose : To assist and further the edu- 
cation, by providing and maintaining 
an equipped library services 
Total vols: 3,482; Bound Journals: 
2,371 ; VF drawers : 3 



Expenditures: $2,025; Circ : 2,567 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : For medical profes- 
sion only 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

LONGFELLOW JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 868 Hazelwood Blvd., 
Fresno 2. Irene Sanford, Libn. 

McLANE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
2727 N. Cedar. William H. Young, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Circ : 13,000 

Total vols : 3,260 ; New : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 88 ; Stud : 1,900 ; Grades : 10-12 

MONTEREY - FRESNO DIOCESAN 

LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1668, 1530 N. 

Fresno. Tel: AP 7-5125. Msgr. James 

H. Culleton, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libus ; 1 other 

Purpose : Californiana and Catholic ref- 
erence books, general reference at col- 
lege level 

Total vols : 20,000 

New titles : 200 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Books on Central 
California also manuscripts. 

Available to : Public, by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted to profes- 
sionals and graduate students 

PACIFIC COLLEGE LIBRARY. 1717 

S. Chestnut Ave. Robert Klassen, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 2,710 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 721 

Subs : Mags : 61 ; Newsp : 9 

Fac : 14 ; Stud : 106 ; Grades : 13-14 

ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4250 E. Tulare. I. G. Neufeld, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 7,500 

Total vols : 6,300 ; New : 300 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 90 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 10-12 

SAN JOAQUIN MEMORIAL HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1402 N. Fresno 
St. Sr. M. Jeromita, C.S.C, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,759.39 ; Circ : 7,168 

Total vols : 7,898 ; New : 598 

Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 34 ; Stud : 773 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY INFOR- 
MATION SERVICE. Fresno Co. L., 
2420 Mariposa St., Fresno 21. Barbara 
L. Wynn, Project Director. 

SEQUOIA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- ! 
BRARY. 4050 Hamilton Ave. 



VOLUME '>,'-/, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



133 



THOMAS A. EDISON HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 540 California Ave., Fresno 
1. Mrs. Ann Hunter, Libn. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 2615 Clinton, 
Fresno 3. Mrs. Rosamond B. Taylor, 
Libn. 

WASHINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 735 Glenn Ave., Fresno 1. 

WASHINGTON UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6041 S. Elm. 
Mrs. Dorothy P. Millard, Libn. 

WAWONA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4524 N. Thorne, Fresno 5. 
Leonora B. Cooper, Libn. 

YOSEMITE JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1292: N. Ninth, Fresno 3. 
Patricia Dart, Libn. 



FULLERTON (Orange Go.) 

BECKMAN INSTRUMENTS, RE- 
SEARCH LIBRARY. 2500 Harbor 
Blvd. Tel: TR 1-4848, ext. 358. Mrs. 
Brigitta M. SteidI, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 2 others 

Purpose : Furnishing literature and 
other services to staff of company 

Total vols : 8,000 ; Pams : 20,000 

New titles : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 350 ; Newsp : 10 

Special collections : Electrical chemistry, 
instrumentation, clinical chemistry, 
electrical engineering, electronics, 
computer, data processing, medical 
electronics 

Circ : 21,000 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting 

FULLERTON ELEM. SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 1401 W. Valencia. 
Mrs. Mary K. Caliicott, Libn. 

/See centralized school lihraries tahle. 

FULLERTON JR. COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 321 E, Chapman Ave. Nancy- 
Lee Carmichael, Libn. 

\8ee junior college lihraries table. 

FULLERTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
301 N. Pomona Ave. Harry M. Rowe, 
Jr., Libn. 

Outlets : 13 elementary school stations 
Bookmobile stops : 8 community, 13 
school stops 

FULLERTON UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 201 E. Chapman 
Ave. Margaret C. Kessler, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 19,312 

Total vols : 18,000 ; New : 877 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 8 

Fac : 99 ; Stud : 1,950 ; Grades : 9-12 



ORANGE COUNTY STATE COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 800 N. Cypress Ave. 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr., Libn. 

/See state and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

SUNNY HILLS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1801 Warburton Way. Mrs. 
Eleanor Sedgwick, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $6,000 ; Circ : 18,126 

Total vols : 3,600 ; New : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 72 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 9-12 



GALT (Scseramenfo Co.) 

GALT JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 145 N. Lincoln Way. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Circ : 6,160 

New : 189 

Subs : Mag : 35 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 26 ; Stud : 500 ; Grades : 9-12 



©AISDENA (Los Aengeles Co.) 

Gardena High School and Peary Jr. 
High School Lihraries, see under Los 

^3S. 



-1 se- 



GARDEN ©ROVE (Orange Co.) 

BOLSA GRANDE HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. M01 Westminster. Kath- 
erine G. Lee, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund: $8,000; Circ: 4,284 

niGStGr 
Total vols : 5,200 ; New : 500 
Subs : Mags : 94 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 83 ; Stud : 1,950 ; Grades : 9-12 

GARDEN GROVE HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 11271 E. Stanford. Muriel 

G. Anderson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,845 ; Circ : 20,921 

Totals vols : 6,593 ; New : 1,126 

Subs : Mags : 79 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 76 ; Stud : 1,865 ; Grades : 9-12 

LIBRARY OF VEHICLES. 12172 
Sheridan Lane. Tel: LE 9-3534, (714). 
W. Everett Miller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : To preserve literature pertain- 
ing to vehicles of transportation and 
to provide research material for engi- 
neering and design, etc. 

Total vols : 5,000 ; Pams : 25,000 

New titles : 150 ; VF drawers : 84 

Subs : Mags : 30 

Special collections : 12,000 auto cata- 
logs, motorcycle catalogs 

Expenditures : $.500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying ; film library ; recordings 



134 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIBS 



GARDEN GROVE-Continued 

RANCHO ALAMITOS HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 11351 Dale St., 
P.O. Box 295. 



GEYSERVILLE (Sonoma Co.) 

GEYSERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 396. Dorothy Bartlett, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $289 ; Circ : 1,380 
Total vols : 1,046 ; New : 76 
Subs : Mags : 18 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 7 ; Stud : 55 ; Grades : 9-12 



GSLROY (Santa Clara Co.) 

GILROY PUBLIC LIBRARY. Fifth 
St. Mrs. M. K. Grodhaus, Libn. 

GILROY UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1.0.0. F. Ave. Vera Ann Swo- 
boda, Libn. 



GLENDALE (Los Angeles Co.) 

CLARK JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4400 Ramsdeil Ave., La Ores- 
centa (Glendaie City Schools). Mrs. 
Betty C. Steffy, Libn. 

ELEANOR J. TOLL JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 700 Gienwood 
Rd., Glendaie 2. 

GENERAL CONTROLS CO. LI- 
BRARY. 801 Allen Ave., Glendaie 1. 
Mrs. Gertrude C. Branch, in charge. 

GLENDALE BRANCH, LOS AN- 
GELES COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 

Glendaie County Courts BIdg., 600 E. 
Broadway, Glendaie 5. Marie Mc- 
Carthy, Attendant. 

GENERAL PRECISION, INC., 
LIBRASCOPE DIVISION, ENGI- 
NEERING LIBRARY. 808 Western 
Ave. Tel: CH 5-8711. Nathan J. 
Sands, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 4 others 
Purpose : To service library needs of en- 
gineers, research personnel, and man- 
agement at Librascope. 
Total vols : 4,000 ; Pams : 1,500 
New titles : 400 
Subs : Mags : 350 ; Newsp : G 
Special collections : Computers 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public (telephone inquiries) 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; film li- 
braries ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

GLENDALE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
1500 N. Verdugo Rd. Thomas J. 
Toohey, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 



GLENDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 319 
E. Harvard St. Horace A. ToIIefson, 
Libn. 

Branches : 5 
Stations : 1 

GLENDALE SANITARIUM AND 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 1509 E. Wil- 
son Ave., Glendaie 6. Mildred Grand- 
bois, Libn. Tel: CH 5-1121. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 

Total vols : 9,259 ; Pams : boxes 31 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 4 

Subs : Mags : 230 ; Newsp : 2 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; brief- 
ing and abstracting; recordings (tape 
or disc) ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

GLENDALE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1440 E. Broadway. Bar- 
bara Ann Canady, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,600 

Total vols : 15,238 ; New : 853 

Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 102 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades : 10-12 

HERBERT HOOVER HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 651 Gienwood Rd. (Mrs.) 
Romayne Palmer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,472 ; Circ : 30,000 

Total vols : 11,000 ; New : 580 

Subs : Mags : 118 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 126 ; Stud : 1,970 ; Grades : 10-12 

HOLY FAMILY GIRLS HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 400 E. Lomita 
Ave. Sister Mary M. Agnes, B.V.M., 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,225.33 ; Circ : 7,152 

Total vols : 3,925 ; New : 353 

Subs : Mags : 30 

Fac : 21 ; Stud : 335 ; Grades : 9-12 

LOS ANGELES COLLEGE OF 
CHIROPRACTIC LIBRARY. 920 E. 
Broadway. Loretta Heacock, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 2,621 
Total vols : 2,430 ; New : 654 
Subs : Mags : 128 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 39 ; Stud : 335 ; 4 year chiroprac- 
tic course 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1017 S. Glendaie. 
Mrs. Lorraine M. Board, Libn. 

WOODROW WILSON JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1221 Monterey. 

Mrs. Helen M. Nadherny, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund: $1,764; Circ: 16,300 

Total vols : 7,900 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 70 

Fac: 48; Stud: 1,250; Grades: 7-9 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



135 



GLENDORA (Los Angeles Co.) 

GLENDORA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 122 
E. Foothill. Henry C. French, Libn. 

GGLETA (Santa Bsarbara Co.) 

SANTA BARBARA CO. SCHOOLS 
LIBRARIES. Education Services Cen- 
ter, P.O. Box 488. Mrs. Charlotte D. 
Davis, Coordinator of Library Serv- 
ices. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 
SANTA BARBARA LIBRARY. Don- 
ald C. Davidson, Libn. Special collec- 
tions: William Wyles Collection. 

See California Universities taile. 

GONZALES (Monterey Co.) 

GONZALES UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Fifth St. 

GRASS VALLEY (Nevada Co.) 

GRASS VALLEY FREE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. Mill St. Alma Popp, Libn. 

NEVADA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 340 Buena Vista St. 

GREENVILLE (Plumas Co.) 

GREENVILLE JR.-SR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. Marie Bartholf, 

Libn. 

Total vols : 2,640 ; New : 58 

Subs : Mags : 22 ; Newsp : 3 

Grades : 7-12 

GRIDLEY (Butte Co.) 

GRIDLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. P.O. 
Box 397. Mrs. Vayne V. Linn, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Butte Co. F. L. 

GRIDLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 300 E. Spruce. Etta S. 

Todd, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 400 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 6 

Tac : 26 ; Grades 9-12 

GROSSMONT (San Diego Co.) 

IGROSSMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
IB RARY. 

GUSTINE (Merced Co.) 

iGUSTINE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
ILIBRARY. 501 North Ave. 

HALF MOON BAY (San Mateo Co.] 

(HALF MOON BAY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box H. 



HAMILTON CITY (Glenn Co.) 

HAMILTON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. P.O. Box 488. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Total vols : 1,000 ; New : 400 

Subs : Mags : 10 ; Newsp : 2 

Tac : 10 ; Stud : 130 ; Grades : 9-12 



HAMILTON FIELD (Marin Co.) 

U.S. AIR FORCE LIBRARY 2541. 

Tel: TU cker 3-7711, ext. 3245. Harriet 

C. Cook, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 

Purpose : To provide personnel stationed 
at Hamilton Air Force Base with 
technical, scientific, educational, and 
recreational reading materials. 

Total vols : 22,495 

New titles : 3,000 

Subs : Mags : 231 ; Newsp : 29 

Special collections : Astronautics, Aero- 
nautics, Electronics, Engineering. 

Expenditures : $9,100 ; Circ : 51,331 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : AU libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Bibliographies 

U.S. SIXTH AIR FORCE RESERVE 
REGION HDQ., WESTERN RE- 
GIONAL REFERENCE LIBRARY. 
Hamilton Air Force Base. Tel: 
TU cker 3-7711, ext. 5203. Elizabeth V. 
Fitts, Libn. 
Staff: 1 libn; 1 clerk 
Purpose: To provide technical and 
professional reading material to Air 
Force Reservists 
Total vols : 13,500 ; Pams : 1,500 
New titles : 2,000 ; VF drawers : 4 
Subs : Mags : 680 ; Newsp : 185 
Special collections : Aeronautics, Mili- 
tary Science 
Expenditures : $20,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 



HANFORD (Kings Co.) 

HANFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 109 
E. 8th St. Alice E. Hall, Libn. 

Contracts with : Kings County Free Li- 
brary 

HANFORD UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 220 E. Grangeville Blvd. 
Florence A. Rhein, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,100 ; Circ : 18.000 

Total vols : 17.290 ; New : 580 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 77 ; Stud : 1,530 ; Grades : 9-12 



136 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES 



HANFORD— Continued 

KINGS COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

Staff : 1 county clerk ; Income : $600 
Total vols : 6,927 ; New : 199 
Open to public for reference only. 

KINGS COUNTY LIBRARY. 319 La- 
cey Blvd. Alice M. Hanna, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Hanford. 

Contracts with : Hanford Public Li- 
brary 

Outlets : 14 

Stations : Armona, Avenal, Clarks Fork, 
Corcoran, Grangeville, Hardwick, 
Island, Kettleman City, Kings River, 
Lemoore, Oakvale, Stratford 

KINGS CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
1144 W. Lacey Blvd. Florence Malott, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



HAWTHORNE (Los Angeles Co.) 

HAWTHORNE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4859 W. El Segundo Blvd. 
Mrs. Dorothy Rhodes, Libn. 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER 
CO., ELECTRONICS DIVISION LI- 
BRARY. 1401 E. El Segundo Blvd. 
Helen J. Jones, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : to furnish research materials 
for all company employees and assist 
in every way possible to locate and 
secure information when needed. 

Total vols: 3,000; Pams : 500; Bound 
periodicals : 1,800 

New Titles : 750 ; VF drawers : 8 

Subs : Mags : 344 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Data processing, 
computers, office machines. 

Expenditures : $10,000 ; Circ : 3,000 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

Services: literatui-e searching; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

NORAIR TECHNICAL INFORMA- 
TION UNIT LIBRARY. 1001 E. 
Broadway. Mr. H. W. Jones, Supv. 



HAYWARD (Alameda Co.) 

ALAMEDA COUNTY LIBRARY. 224 
W. Winton Ave. Mrs. Dorothy F. Rob- 
erts, Libn. 

Serves : County except Alameda, Berke- 
ley, Oakland, Piedmont, Livermore 
Contracts with : Albany, Emeryville, 

Havward, and San Leandro 
Outlets : 44 

Branches : Castro Valley, Fremont 
(Centerville and Niles), Newark, San 
Lorenzo 



Stations : Arroyo del Valle,* Castro 
Hill, Fairmont, Fremont (Irvington 
and Mission San Jose * ) , Highland, 
Masonic Hill, Mount Eden, Pleasan- 
ton, Russell, Sunol, Union City (Al- 
varado and Decoto), Veterans Admin- 
istration Hospital Livermore 

Bookmobile stops : 25 

ALAMEDA CO. PLANNING DEPT., 
STAFF LIBRARY. 224 W. Winton 
Ave. Mrs. Caroline Wagner, Supv. 

ALAMEDA CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
224 W. Winton Ave. Elsie D. Holland, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

ALAMEDA CO. STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 22300 Foothill Blvd. Floyd 
R. Erickson, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

HAYWARD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 22300 Foothill Blvd. Wallace 
Copeland, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,600 ; Circ : 24,552 
Total vols : 10,597 ; New : 630 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 85 ; Stud : 1,700 ; Grades 9-12 

HAYWARD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 22737 
Mission Blvd. William G. Webster, 
Libn. 

Contracts with : Alameda County Li- 
brary 

LA VISTA SCHOOL DISTRICT. 29774 
Mission Blvd. Mrs. Mary Jo Freeman, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SUNSET HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

22100 Princeton. John Patton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,600 ; Circ : 17,800 

Total vols : 3,800 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp. 3 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,350 ; Grades : 9-12 

TENNYSON HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 27035 Whitman. Katharine 
Long, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,300 ; Circ : 16,830 

Total vols : 5,325 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 100 ; Stud : 2,300 ; Grades : 9-12 



HEALDSBURG (Sonoma Co.) 

HEALDSBURG CARNEGIE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 221 Matheson St. Mrs. 
Marie B. Duffee, Libn. 

HEALDSBURG HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1024 Prince St. 



* Discontinued during fiscal year. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



137 



HEALDSBURG JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 315 Grant St. 

HEMET (Riverside Co.) 

HEMET JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1200 E. Acacia Ave. Iris 
Bramblett, Libn. 

Staff : i libn ; ^ clerk 

Circ : 4,425 

Total vols : 1.000 

Subs : Mass : 16 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 23 ; Stud : 480 ; Grades : 7-9 

HEMET PUBLIC LIBRARY. 510 E. 
Florida Ave. Violet R. Tapper, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 
Station : 1 

HEIVIET SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 831 E. Devonshire St. 



HERLONG (Lassen Co.) 

HERLONG HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Dora C. Andersen, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : .$300 ; Circ : 958 
Total vols : 1,054 ; New : 50 
Subs : Mags : 22 ; Newsp : 3 
Stud : 170 ; Grades 9-12 



HERMOSA BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) 

PIER AVENUE SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

710 Pier Avenue. Mrs. Elizabeth Le- 

Baron, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn 

Book fund : $2.500 ; Circ : 1,891 

Total vols : 1.015 ; New 1,015 

Subs : Mass : 28 

Fac : 18 ; Stud : 438 ; Grades 7-9 



HSGHLAND (San Bernardino Co.) 

Highland Jr. High School Library, see 
San Bernardino. 



HIGHLAND PARK (Los Angeles Co.) 

See under Los Angeles 

HILLSBOROUGH (San Mateo Co.) 

HILLSBOROUGH SCHOOL DIST. 
PROF. LIB. AND SCHOOL LIB. 
CENTER. 2600 Ralston Ave. Jeannetta 
Powell, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

HILMAR (Merced Co.) 

HSLMAR HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Lander Ave. Onetia Pace, Libn. 



HOLLISTER (San Benito Co.) 

SAN BENITO COLLEGE LIBRARY 
Nash Road and San Benito Street, 
Mrs. Lauretta M. Greiner, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 470 Fifth St. Kathryn Dool- 
ing, Libn. 

Affiliated with : San Juan Bautista City 
Librarj' 

Outlets : 27 

Stations : Aromitas, Bear Valley, Bitter- 
water, Panoche, San Benito 

Schools : 20 

SAN BENITO CO. HIGH SCHOOL 

AND JR. COLLEGE. Monterey Street. 

Denise F. Keil, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 13,233 

Total vols : 7,402 ; New : 875 

Subs : Mags : 148 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 38 ; Stud : 820 ; Grades 9-14 

SAN BENITO CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
SAN BENITO CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 

HOLLYWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) 

See under Los Angeles. 

HOLTVILLE (Imperial Co.) 

HOLTVILLE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 755 Olive. Marjorie L, 
Wilson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 3,000 
Total vols : 4,662 ; New 350 
Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 22 ; Grades : 9-12 

HOOPA (Humboldt Co.) 

HOOPA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Mrs. Claramae Sahmaunt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Circ : 5,775 

Total vols : 1,700 ; New : 100 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 1 ; Stud : 14 ; Grades : 5-12 

HOPLAND (Mendocino Co.) 

HOPLAND UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 398. 

Total vols : 500 

Subs : Mags : 21 

Fac : 5 ; Students : 69 ; Grades : 9-12 

KUGHSON (Stanislaus Co.) 

HUGHSON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 598. Grace E. 
Bishop, Libn. 



138 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



HUNTINGTON BEACH (Orange Co.] 

HUNTINGTON BEACH HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1905 Main St. 
Mrs. Beth C. Brown, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3,246.25 ; Circ : 27,995 
Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 62 ; Grades : 9-12 

HUNTINGTON BEACH PUBLIC Ll> 
BRARY. 525 Main. Walter Johnson, 
Libn. 
Branches : 1 



HUNTINGTON PARK (Los Angeles Co.) 

Carmelita High School, Henry T. Gage, 
Jr. High School and Huntington Park 
Union High School libraries, see un- 
der Los Angeles. 



IMOLA (N«pc! Co.) 

NAPA STATE HOSPITAL, MEDI- 
CAL LIBRARY. Tel: BA Idwin 6-2011, 
Ext. 477. Margaret M. Roche, Libn. 
Special collections : Psychiatry, neurol- 
ogy, clinical psychology, psychiatric 
social work, nursing, rehabilitation, 
general medicine 
Expenditures : 3,350 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 
See also state department of mental 
hygiene-institutional liiraries table. 

IMPERIAL (Impericsi Co.) 

IMPERIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9th 
& H. Mrs. Norma A. Hicks, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Imperial Co. F. L. 

IMPERIAL VALLEY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 517 W. Main St. 
Mrs. Mattie Kelly, Libn. 

IMPERIAL BEACH (Scin Diego Co.) 

Mar Vista High School Library, see 
Palm City. 

INDEPENDENCE (Inyo Co.) 

INYO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Richard B. Engen, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county. 

Contracts with : Mono County 

Outlets : 8 (Inyo Co. only) 

Stations : Big Fine, Bishop, Furnace 

Creek, Long Pine, Rovana, Tecopa, 

Shoshone 
Teachers Professional Library 

INYO CO. LAW LIBRARY, court- 
house. 



INYO CO. TEACHERS' LIBRARY. 
Education & Welfare BIdg. Box 26. 
Included in Co. F.L. 

MONO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Address: Inyo C. Free Library, Inde- 
pendence. Richard B. Engen, Libn. 

Contracts with : Inyo Co. Free Library 
Outlets: 3 (Mono Co. only) 
Stations : Bridgeport, Hot Creek, Lee 
Vining 

INDIO (Riverside Co.) 

INDIO HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Ave. 46 & Clinton. Milford Whittlesey, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 950 per mo. 

Total vols : 7,486 

Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 55 ; Stud : 929 ; Grades : 9-12 

INDIO PUBLIC LIBRARY. Miles at 
Deglet Noor. Mrs. Jane M. Walker, 
Libn. 

Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 



INGLEWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) 

ALBERT MONROE JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 10711 Tenth 

Ave. Mrs. Ruth Dodd, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,800 

Total vols : 3,481 ; New : 300 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 900 ; Grades : 7-9 

ELECTRONIC TECHNICAL INSTI- 
TUTE LIBRARY. 970 W. Manchester. 
Mr. Cecil Reed, Libn. 

Staff : 1 other 

Purpose : Student reference 
Total vols : 500 
New titles : 25 
Subs : Mags : 10 
Expenditures : $250 
Available to : Co. staff 
Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

INGLEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 231 S. Grevillea. Bernice 
Sward, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $5,000 ; Circ : 413 per day 
Total vols : 17,352 ; New : 967 
Subs : Mags : 43 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 92 ; Stud : 1,896 ; Grades : 9-12 

INGLEWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

105 Queen St. John Perkins, Libn. 
To be established July 1, 1962. 

LENNOX HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

11033 S. Buford, Lennox (Inglewood 

city schools). Mrs. Elizabeth Di Masi, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i time 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 5,000 

Total vols : 3,741 ; New : 871 

Subs : Mags : 76 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 43 ; Stud : 784 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME '^J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



139 



MONROE JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10711 Tenth Ave. Peggy 
Brands, Libn. 

MORNINGSIDE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10500 Yuken, Inglewood 2. 
Mrs. Lenore Eberle, Libn. 

NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, 
INC., ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 
5701 W. Imperial Highway. 

NORTHROP INSTITUTE OFTECH- 
NOLOGY LIBRARY. 1155 W. Arbor 
Vitae. Milton Padno, Libn. 

See State and other four-year Colleges 
table, 

iONE (Riverside Co.) 

lONE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

P.O. Box 64. Mrs. Alice B. Shaver, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $380 

Total vols : 1,500 ; New : 150 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 11 ; Stud : 120 ; Grades : 9-12 

PRESTON SCHOOL OF INDUSTRY 
LIBRARY. R.R. Box 5. John H. 
Bjarnason, Libn. 

Subs : Mags : 63 

Fac : 43 ; Stud : 700 ; 150 extended day ; 

Grades : 1-12 
See also state prison and correctional 

school libraries table. 



JACKSON (Amadoir Co.) 

AMADOR COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Box 218. 

AMADOR COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

AMADOR COUNTY LIBRARY. 

Courthouse Square, Box 637. Evanne 
Wheeler, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Outlets : 14 

Stations : Amador City, Fiddletown,* 

lone, Pine Grove, Plymouth, Sutter 

Creek 
Schools : 8 

JACKSON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 665. Dorothy S. 
van Thiel, Libn. 

Staif : 1 teacher-libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $200 

Total vols : 1,050 ; New : 50 

Subs : Mags : 15 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 13 ; Stud : 167 ; Grades : 9-12 



JOHNSONDALE (Tu!ai-e Co.) 

JOHNSONDALE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 5. 



* Discontinued during fiscal year. 



JULIAN (San Diego Co.) 

JULIAN UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Banner Rd., P.O. Box 154. 
Mrs. Margaret M. Morton, Libn. 



KELSEYVILLE (Lake Co.) 

KELSEYVILLE FREE LIBRARY. 
Kelseyvilie Women's Club BIdg. 

Note : Supported by the club. 



KENTF9ELD (Marin Co.) 

COLLEGE OF MARIN LIBRARY. 
Charles D. Mastin, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

KERMAN (Fresno Co.) 

KERMAN UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Janet Roup, Libn. 

KING CITY (Monterey Co.) 

KING CITY JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 720 Broadway. 
Theresa Reed, Libn. 

KING CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 212 
S. Vanderhurst Ave. Mrs. Elsie V. 
Newman, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Monterey Co. F. L. 

KINGSSURG (Fresno Co.) 

KINGSBURG JT. UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1900 18th St. 
Mrs. Elsa Smith, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $959 ; Circ : 6,945 

Total vols : 3,355 ; New : 235 

Subs : Mags : 23 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 29 ; Stud : 560 ; Grades : 9-12 

LA CANADA (Los Angeles Co.) 

La Canada Jr. High School Library and 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Li- 
brary, see under Pasadena. 

LA S^ABRA (Orange Co.) 

CALIFORNIA RESEARCH CORP. 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 446. Tel: OW 
1-2241. Jean M. Legg, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 4 clerks 

Purpose : To serve company's employees 

Total vols : 15,000 ; VF drawers : 25 

Subs : Mags : 480 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions. 



140 



isTEws Notes o^ cALiPOtiNiA libearies 



LA HABRA— Continued 

LA HABRA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 801 W. Rose. Mrs. Dorothy 
W. Ashby, Libn. 

LA JOLLA (San Diego Co.) 

LA JOLLA JR,-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 750 Nautilus. Cecilia Pres- 
inger, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,032.50 ; Circ : 26,117 

Total vols : 9,854 ; New : 480 

Subs : Mags : 97 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,600 ; Grades : 7-12 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 

SAN DIEGO. LIBRARY. Melvin J. 

Voigt, Libn. 

Branches : Scripps Institution of Ocea- 
nography Library and School of 
Science and Engineering Library 

See California Universities taile. 



LA SIERRA (Riverside Co.) 

LA SIERRA COLLEGE, FULTON 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY. D. G. Hilts, 
Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



LA VERNE (Los Angeles Co.) 

BONITA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

3102 D St. E. Louise Larick, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,764 

Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 660 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 37 ; Stud : 795 ; Grades : 9-12 

LA VERNE COLLEGE. Eunice M. 
Swank, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



LA MESA (Scan Diego Co.) 

HELIX HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
7323 University Ave. Robert F. Free- 
land, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $8,000 

Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 2,000 

Subs : Mags : 32 ; Newsp : 12 

Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,850 ; Grades : 9-12 

LA MESA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 420O Parks. Edward W. 
Barth, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $4,200 ; Circ : 34,617 

Total vols : 10,178 ; New : 1,376 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 57 ; Stud : 1,340 ; Grades : 7-9 

LA MESA-SPRING VALLEY 
SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY. 4750 
Date Ave. Wayne McAllister, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

LA MiRADA (Los Angeles Co.) 

BIOLA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 13800 
Biola Ave. Arnold D. Ehlert, Libn. 

Departmental Library : Biola School of 
Missionary Medicine, 558 S. Hope 
St., Los Angeles 17 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

LA PUENTE (Los Angeles Co.) 

LA PUENTE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 15615 E. Nelson. William 
J. Strange, Libn. 

State : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 
Book fund : $5,150 ; Circ : 30,000 
Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 1,800 
Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac: 87; Stud: 2,000; Extended day: 
2,500 ; Grades : 9-12 



LAFAYETTE (Contra Costa Co.) 

ACALANES UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1200 Pleasant Hill Rd. 
Ruth E. Fletcher, Libn. 



LAGUNA BEACH (Orange Co.) 

LAGUNA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL & 
MARIE THURSTON INTERMEDI- 
ATE SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 620 
Short St. Mary E. Carhart, Libn. 
State : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 9,065 
Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 391 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac: 45; Students: Sr. high: 566; 
Inter, sch : 278 ; Grades 7-12 



LAKE ARROWHEAD (San Bernardino Co.) 

RIM OF THE WORLD HIGH 
SCHOOL AND JR. HIGH LIBRARY. 
P.O. Box 30. Mrs. Mary A. Soderberg, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 7,767 

Total vols : 5,500 ; New : 700 

Subs : Mags : 44 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 25 ; Stud : 500 ; Grades : 7-12 



LAKE ISABELLA (Kern Co.) 

KERN VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Joyce A. Hanna, Libn. 



LAKEPORT (Lake Co.) 

CLEAR LAKE UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 698. 
James F. Henderson, Libn. 



VOLUME •^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



141 



LAKE CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 210 
Park St. Mrs. Mary C. Gibson, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries tahle. 

LAKE CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 

LAKEPORT CARNEGIE LIBRARY. 
200 Park St. Mrs. Alice Hendricks, 
Libn. 



LAKEWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) 



FRANKLIN D. 
HIGH SCHOOL 
Clark. 



ROOSEVELT JR. 
LIBRARY. 6145 N. 



LAKEWOOD SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4400 Briercrest Ave. Mar- 
jorie F. Ray, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $4,795 

Total vols : 10,011 ; New : 1,047 

Subs : Mags : 106 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 118 ; Stud : 2,563 ; Grades 10-12 



LANCASTER (Los Angeies Co.) 

ANTELOPE VALLEY HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 44900 Division 
St. Mrs. Elizabeth U. Lorbeer, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $8,621 ; Circ : 12,660 

Total vols : 13,500 ; New : 2,030 

Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 102 ; Stud : 2,300 ; Grades 9-12 

ANTELOPE VALLEY JR. COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 45024 Third St., 
East. 

See California junior college libraries 
tahle. 

LARKSPUR (Marin Co.) 

LARKSPUR PUBLIC LIBRARY. P.O. 
Box 518. Mrs. Helen S. Wilson, Libn. 

REDWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. (Tamalpais Union High 
School District.) Mildred Mateer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $7,070 ; Circ : 10,000 
Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 1,927 
Subs : Mags : 54 ; Newsp : 4 
I Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,390 ; Grades : 9-12 



LAWNDALE (Los Angeles Co.) 

LEUZINGER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4118 W. Rosecrans. Catherine 
Bitticks, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,158 ; Circ : 13,847 
Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 788 
Subs : Mags : 77 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 90 ; Stud : 1,750 ; Grades : 9-12 



LE GRAND (Merced Co.) 

LE GRAND UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 68. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $700 ; Circ : 95 

Total vols : 3,250 ; New : 210 

Subs : Mags : 30 : Newsp : 2 

Fac : 17 ; Stud : 235 ; Grades : 9-12 



LEE VINING (Mono Co.) 

LEE VINING HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Clarene C. Noiin, Libn. 



LEMOORE (Kings Co.) 

LEMOORE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 



LENNOX (Los Angeles Co.) 

Lennox High School Library. See under 
Ingleivood. 



LINCOLN (Placer Co.) 

LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
R. Oliva, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 1,750 

Total vols : 2,500 ; New : 1,600 

Subs : Mags : 20 

Fac : 17 ; Stud : 375 ; Grades : 9-12 

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. Fifth 
and F Sts., Box 757. Mrs. Priscilla I. 
Harris, Libn. 



LINDA VISTA (San Diego Co.) 

Libraries in Linda Vista are listed 
under San Diego. 



LATHROP (San Joaquin Co.) 

U.S. ARMY, SHARP GENERAL 
DEPOT POST LIBRARY. 



LATON (Fresno Co.) 

LATON JOINT UNION 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 



HIGH 



LINDA (San Joaquin Co.) 

LINDEN UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 538. 



LINDSAY (Tulare Co.) 

LINDSAY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
250 N. Harvard. 



142 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LIVE OAK (Sutter Co.) 

UNION HIGH SCHOOL 



LOMPOC (Santa Barbara Co.) 



LIVE OAK 
LIBRARY. 



LIVERMORE (Alameda Co.) 

LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORA- 
TORY LIBRARY. University of Cali- 
fornia. Box 808. 

LIVERIVIORE JT. UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 600 Maple St. 
Mrs. Thelma Rundstrom, Libn. 

Staff : 2 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $4,500 ; Circ : 8,400 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 2,227 

Subs : Mass : 25 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac: 55; Stud: 1,100; Grades 9-12 

LIVERMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

2155 Third. Donald Nolte, Libn. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL, GENERAL AND MEDI- 
CAL LIBRARIES. Mrs. Flora M. 
Critchlow, Libn. 



LIVSNGSTON (Merced Co.) 

LIVINGSTONE HIGH SCHOOL LI 

BRARY. Leon Lee, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $400 ; Circ : 240.000 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 1.000 

Subs : Mass : 29 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 600 ; Grades 9-12 



LODI (Ssn Joaquin Co.) 

LODI ACADEMY LIBRARY. 1215 S. 
Garfield. 

LODI PUBLIC LIBRARY. 305 W. 

Pine St. Amy L. Boynton, Libn. 

LODI UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Walnut and Hutchins Sts. 
Warren B. Hicks, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $8,200 ; Circ : 38,476 

Total vols : 18,209 ; New 1,707 

Subs : Mags : 109 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 111 ; Stud : 2,227 ; Grades : 9-12 



LOMA LINDA (San Bernardino Co.) 

LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY, VER- 
NIER RADCLIFF MEMORIAL LI- 
BRARY. Leroy W. Otto, Libn. 

Branches : White Memorial Hospital 
Branch, Los Angeles. 



LOAAITA (Los Angeles Co.) 

Alexander Fleming Jr. High School Li- 
brary, Nathaniel Narhonne High 
School Lihrary, see under Los An- 
geles. 



HIGH SCHOOL 
L St. Mrs. Ruth 



LOMPOC JR.-SR 
LIBRARY. 203 S. 
Solovsky, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; | teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,400 ; Circ : 8,122 
Total vols : 4,935 ; New : 1,082 
Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 77 ; Stud : 855 ; Grades : 7-12 

LOMPOC PUBLIC LIBRARY. 200 So. 
H. St. Theodora L. Johnson, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Santa Barbara Co. 
F. L,. 

LOMPOC UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. Chestnut and I 
Sts. Wayne Hastings, Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 

U.S. ARMY BRANCH DISCIPLI- 
NARY BARRACKS, POST LIBRARY. 
VANDENBERG JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Vandenberg A. F. B. 
Wayne Hastings, Libn. 

LONE PINE (Inyo Co.) 

LONE PINE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 

Affiliated with : Inyo Co. F. L. 

LONG BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) 

AVALON PUBLIC SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. Box J-1,Avaion, Santa Cata- 
lina Island (Long Beach city schools). 
Jane B. Bowman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $800 

Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 300 

Subs : Mags : 24 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 18 ; Stud : 365 ; Grades : 1-12 

BANCROFT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5301 Centralia, Long Beach 
8. Edith R. Rex, Libn. 

CECIL B. DeMILLE JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 7025 E. Park- 
crest St., Long Beach 8. Marjorie R. 
Wintz, Libn. 

DAVID STARR JORDAN HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6500 Atlantic 
Ave. Mrs. Ellanora H. Kramer, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,605.11 ; Circ : 21,462 

Total vols : 18,068 ; New : 1,459 

Subs : Mags : 128 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 84 ; Stud : 1,905 ; Grades 10-12 

FRANKLIN JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 540 Cerritos Ave. Lucille 
Boyle, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,084 : Circ : 20,000 

Total vols : 7,756 ; New : 499 

Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 45 ; Stud : 915 ; Grades : 7-9 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



143 



GEORGE WASHINGTON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1450 Cedar Ave., 
Long Beach 13. Mrs. Ivadene Welch, 
Libn. 

HAIVIILTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1060 E. 70th St., Long Beach 
15. Mildred Bakke, Libn. 

HERBERT HOOVER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3501 E. Green- 
top St. 

HUGHES JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3846 California. Louise But- 
ler, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; li clerks 

Book fund : $2,700 ; Circ : 36,288 

Total vols : 9,802 ; New : 743 

Subs : Mags : 89 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 7-9 

JOHN DEWEY CONTINUATION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 835 E. 
Eighth St., Long Beach 2. 

JOHN MARSHALL JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5870 E. Ward- 
low. Mrs. Trudy Snyder, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; If clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 25,000 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 55 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades 7-9 

LELAND STANFORD JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5871 Los Arcos. 

Mrs. Lois H. Nissen, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; li clerk 

Book fund : $2,100 ; Circ : 35,750 

Total vols : 7,980 ; New 923 

Subs : Mags : 36 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,575 ; Grades : 7-9 

LINDBERGH JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Market and Lewis Sts., 
Long Beach 5. Dorothy L. Stanford, 
Libn. 

LONG BEACH BRANCH, LOS AN- 
GELES CO. LAW LIBRARY. 36 Ar- 
cade, Jergins Trust BIdg., 100 E. 
Ocean Ave., Long Beach 2. Mrs. Kay 
I Dunn, Attendant. 

LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Liberal Arts Division. 4901 
E. Carson St. Bess Olson, Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries table. 

— BUSINESS AND TECHNOL- 
OGY DIV. LIBRARY. 1305 E. Pacific 
Coast Hwy., Long Beach 8. Bess 
Olson, Libn. 

LONG BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Ocean and Pacific Ave. Blanche W. 
Collins, Libn. 

Branches : 10 
Stations : 1 
Bookmobile stops : 9 



LONG BEACH STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 6101 E. Seventh St. Chas. 
J. Boorkman, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

LONG BEACH UNFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT OFFICE OF LIBRARY 
SERVICE. 715 Locust Ave., Long 
Beach 13. 

LONG BEACH UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. TEACHERS PROFES- 
SI9NAL LIBRARY. 215 E. Eighth St. 
Lois Fannin, Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 

MILLIKAN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2800 Snowden. C. Cecilia 
Burch, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $4,118 ; Circ : 34,096 

Total vols : 11,059 ; New : 1,263 

Subs : Mags : 108 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 106 ; Stud : 2,546 ; Grades : 10-12 

PACIFIC BIBLE SEMINARY LI- 
LIBRARY. 4835 E. Anaheim, Long 
Beach 4. Martha Hurst, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

POLYTECHNIC HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 16th and Atlantic. Dolores 
Lawless and Lucille McGuire, Libns. 

Staff : 2 teacher-libn ; 2 clerks 

Circ : 40,000 

Total vols : 30,000 ; New : 1,200 

Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 140 ; Stud : 3,015 ; Grades 10-12 

ROGERS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 365 Monrovia. Shirley Hollis, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,375.65 ; Circ : 3,200 

Total vols : 6,044 ; New : 475 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 35 ; Stud : 750 ; Grades : 7-9 

ST. ANTHONY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Seventh and Olive, Long 
Beach 12. 

STANFORD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5871 Los Arcos, Long Beach 
15. Mrs. Lois H. Nissen, Libn. 

STEPHENS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Santa Fe Ave. and Columbia 
St. (Mrs.) Ima Venable, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 14 clerks 

Book fund : $1,4'12 ; Circ : 23,353 

Total vols : 8,466 ; New : 474 

Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 45 ; Stud : 1,100 ; Grades : 7-9 

THOMAS JEFFERSON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 750 Euclid Ave., 
Long Beach 3. 



144 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



L0^9G BEACH— Continued 

U.S. AIR FORCE 2347th AFRTC LI- 
BRARY. Municipal Airport, Long 
Beach. 

U.S. NAVAL STATION LIBRARY, 
Terminal Island, Long Beach 2. Mrs. 
Ethel M. Robinson, Libn. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 5901 E. Sev- 
enth St., Long Beach 4. Tel: GE 
9-6861, Ext. 593. Mrs. Nila R. Staar- 
gaard, Libn. 
Staff : 4 libns ; 1 other 
Purpose : To provide reading for hos- 
pitalized veterans and provide medi- 
cal library service for hospital staff 
Totals vols : Medical 5,500 ; Patients 

12,000 
Subs : Mags : 255 ; Newsp : 4 
Special collections : Medical collection 
Expenditures : $7,900 ; Circ : 42,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscrip- 
tions 

WOODROW WILSON SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 10th and Ximeno. 
Beverley J. Wilson, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 29,667 

Total vols : 21,356 ; New : 954 

Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 90 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades : 10-12 



LOOMBS (Placer Co.) 



HIGH SCHOOL 
1, Box 1009. R. A. 



Ll- 

Hoff- 



DEL ORO 
BRARY. Rt 

mann, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 1,965 

Total vols : 1,500 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 52 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 20 ; Stud : 400 ; Grades : 9-12 



LOS ALTOS (Santsi Clcsm Co.) 

LOS ALTOS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 201 Almond Ave. Mrs. Martha 
C. Blalock, Libn. 

Staff : 1* libns ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $6,772 ; Circ : 19,259 

Total vols : 7,704 ; New : 1,463 

Subs : Mags : SO ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 101 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades : 9-12 

LOS ALTOS SCHOOL DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 188. Mrs. Jean 
Wenzel, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



LOS ALTOS HILLS (Santa Clara Co.) 

FOOTHILL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

12345 El Monte Ave. Elizabeth Martin, 
Libn. 

See California junior college libraries 
table. 



LOS ANGELES (Los Angeies Co.) 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3501 N. Broad- 
way, L.A. 31. 

ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE 
ARTS AND SCIENCES LIBRARY. 

9038 Melrose, L.A. 46. 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 
RESEARCH LIBRARY. 1145 W. Sixth 
St., L.A. 17. 

AIRPORT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9000 Airport Blvd., L.A. 45. 

ALEXANDER FLEMING JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 25425 Walnut 
St., Lomita. Janet D. McOuat, Libn. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2955 Robertson 
Blvd., L.A. 34. 

AMERICAN POTASH AND CHEMI- 
CAL CORP. LIBRARY. 3000 W. Sixth 
St., L.A. 5. Tel: DU 2-8231, Ext. 239. 

ANDREW JACKSON HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2821 E. Seventh St. Sam 
Rubenstein, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $209 

Total vols : 1,450 ; New : 17 

Subs : Mags : 23 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 25 ; Stud : 400 ; Grades : 7-12 

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED 
ARTS LIBRARY. Suite 9A, 3723 Wil- 
shire Blvd., L.A. 5. 

THE ART CENTER SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5353 W. Third St. Mrs. Judy 
Hutchins, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

AUDUBON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4201 Creed Ave. Cecilia M. 
Martucci, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,645.88 ; Circ : 27,805 

Total vols : 11,790 ; New : 1,104 

Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 85 ; Stud : 2,095 ; Grades : 7-9 

BARLOW SANITORIUM, ELKS TU- 
BERCULOSIS LIBRARY. 1301 Cha- 
vez Ravine Rd., L.A. 26. Tel: MA 
8-4165. Betty Warrington, Libn. 

BELL HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
4238 Bell Ave., Bell. (Los Angeles City 
Schools). Helen L. Neel, Libn. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



145 



BELMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1575 W. Second St. Paul L. 
Monroe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 
Book fund : $2;i58.78 
Total vols : 15,611 ; New : 282 
Subs : Mags : 135 ; Newsp : 5 
Stud : 1,763 ; Grades : 10-12 

BELVEDERE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 312 N. Record St. Mrs. 
Dorothy Keiser, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $i;541.31 ; Circ : 18,886 

Total vols : 8,739 ; Nev? : 591 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 81 ; Stud : 1,656 ; Grades : 7-9 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 820 N. Avenue 
54. Jean D. Sandlie, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 13,000 ; New : 517 
Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 4 
Grades : 10-12 

BERENDO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1157 S. Berendo St., L.A. 6. 

BIRMINGHAM JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 6451 Balboa Blvd., Van 
Nuys. (Los Angeles City Schools). 

BISHOP CONATY MEMORIAL 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2900 W. 
Pico Blvd. Sr. Gabriel Marie, C.S.J., 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 9,546 

Total vols : 5,175 ; New : 407 

Subs : Mags : 56 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 45 ; Stud : 1,122 ; Grades : 9-12 

BLACK FOXE MILITARY SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 637 N. Wilcox, L.A. 4. 

BRAILLE INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 
741 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 29. Tel: 
NO 3-1111. Henriette J. Worsfold, 
Libn. 

BRET HARTE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 9301 S. Hoover St., L.A. 
42. Sally Beck, Libn. 

BURROUGHS JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 600 S. McCadden. Dorothy 
E. Adams, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; J clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 40,000 

Total vols : 12,000 

Subs : Mags : 55 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,800 ; Grades : 7-9 

CALIFORNIA HOSPITAL CIRCU- 
LATING LIBRARY. 1414 S. Hope, 
L.A. 15. Mrs. Caroline S. Henry, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : Circulating of books and other 

reading material to hospital patients 

and employees 
Total vols : 1,400 
New titles : 30 



Subs : Mags : 8 ; Newsp : 1 
Expenditures : $70 ; Circ : 5,000 
Available to : Patients and Co. staff 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY, SONS OF 
THE REVOLUTION LIBRARY. 437 
S. Hope St. Quincy B. Nichols, Libn. 

Staff : 2 

Purpose : Genealogy library only 

Total vols : 18,000 ; Pams : 2,000 

New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 20 

Subs : Mags : 50 

Special collections : Genealogy 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services: Bibliographies; photostat 
copying ; briefing and abstracting 

CALIFORNIA TAXPAYERS ASSO- 
CIATION LIBRARY. 750 Pacific Elec- 
tric Bldg., L.A. 14. 

CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1253 Bishops Rd. Brother R. 
Cormac, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $1,180 ; Circ : 5,400 
Total vols : 4,760 ; New : 426 
Subs : Mags : 31 ; Newsp : 1 
Grades : 9-12 

CEDARS OF LEBANON HOSPITAL 
MEDICAL LIBRARY. 4838 Fountain 
Ave,, L.A. 29. Philip Alexander, Libn. 

CHARLES R. HADLEY CO., SYS- 
TEMS RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 330 N. Los Angeles St., L.A. 
12. 

CHILDRENS HOSPITAL OF LOS 
ANGELES LIBRARY. 4614 Sunset 
Blvd. Tel: NO 3-3341, ext. 376. Mrs. 
Marian C. Hayes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To provide medical library 
service to the hospital staff — prima- 
rily to the professional staff for re- 
search and study of pediatries and 
allied sciences 

Total vols : 5,026 ; Pams : 250 

New titles : 200 

Subs : Mags : 95 ; Newsp : 3 

Special collections: Medicine (emphasis 
on pediatrics) nursing and allied sci- 

Expenditures : $1,953 ; Circ : 5,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

CHOUINARD ART INSTITUTE LI- 
BRARY. 743 S. Grand View St. Mrs. 
Dorothy E. Fearman, Libn. 

See State and other four-year colleges 
table. 



146 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LOS ANGELES-Continued 

COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC PHY- 
SICIANS AND SURGEONS LI- 
BRARY. 1721 Griffin Ave. IVlargaret 
D. Cressaty, Libn. 

Departmental Libraries : (18) Anatomy, 
Biochemistry, Cancerology, Cardio- 
vascular, Clinic, Clinic — EENT, 
Clinic — Pediatrics, Histology, Hos- 
pital, Hospital-Pathology, Los An- 
geles County Osteopathic Hospital 
Research Program, X-Ray Dept., 
Medical Microbiology, Mental Health 
Training, Pathology, Physiology, 
Pharmacology, Rehabilitation 

See State and other four-year colleges 

taile. 

COLORADO RIVER BOARD OF 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. Rm. 230, 

909 S. Broadway, L.A. 15. Tel: IVIA 

0-4480. Mrs. Margot Stevens, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : Specialized library in fields of 
water resources and development, 
water utilization and conservation, 
specialized engineering and legal ap- 
plications relating thereto 

Total vols : 5,500 ; Pams : 200-300 

New titles : 500-700 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 8 

Special collections : Water supply 
papers ; govt, publications on Colo- 
rado River matters 

Circ : 3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying 

COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP., RE- 
SEARCH DEPT. LIBRARY. 1438 N. 
Gower St., Hollywood 28. 

DANIEL WEBSTER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 11330 W. Gra- 
ham Place, L.A. 64. 

DAVID STARR JORDAN HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2265 E. 103rd. 
Mrs. Maria L. Derr, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1427.32 ; Circ : 4,568 

Total vols : 5,675 ; New : 595 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 67 ; Stud : 1,329 ; Grades : 10-12 

DAVID STARR JORDAN JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 420 S. Mariposa. 

Department of Health Library of the 
City of Los Angeles. See Public 
Health Library. 

Department of Water and Poiver Li- 
brary. See Water and Poiver Dept. 
Municipal Reference Library. 

Department of Water and Power Laio 
Library. See Water and Power Dept. 
Law Library. 



de FOREST RESEARCH SERVICE 

LIBRARY. 780 N. Gower, L.A. 38. 

Tel: HO 9-7440. Kellam de Forest, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : Research services 

Total vols : 3,100 ; Pams : 110 

New titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 110 

Subs : Mags : 12 ; Newsp : 2 

Expenditures : $900 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

EAGLE ROCK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1750 Yosemite Dr., M. L. 
MacDonald, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 4 clerk 

Book fund : $2,946.98 ; Circ : 9,306 

Total vols : 9,891 ; New : 994 

Subs : Mags : 99 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 88 ; Stud : 1,824 ; Grades : 7-12 

EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 5357 E. Brooklyn Ave, 
Frederic M. Blissert, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

EDWIN MARKHAM JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1650 E. 104th 
St. Richard Leonard, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,344.60 ; Circ : 10,117 

Total vols : 4,211 ; New : 575 

Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 112 ; Stud : 2,399 ; Grades : 7-9 

FAIRFAX HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

7850 Melrose. Nadine Stegelmeyer, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Fac : 94 ; Stud : 2,292 ; Grades : 10-12 

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP LI- 
BRARY. 4680 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 54. 

FARRAND, FISHER & FARRAND 
LAW LIBRARY. 420 Rowan Bldg., 
458 S. Spring St., L.A. 13. Mrs. Nancy 
Duncan, Libn. 
Serves : Only the firm and its employees 

FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE JR. 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3311 N. 

Figueroa. Miss Mitchell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 11 hrs. per wk. clerk 

Book fund : $1,477 

Total vols : 5,882 ; New : 741 

Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 58 ; Stud : 1,270 ; Grades : 7-9 

FOOTE, CONE «S. BELDING, INC., 
LIBRARY. 900 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 
17. Tel: MA 9-3611, ext. 212. Laura J. 
Rainey, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To provide information and 
materials for the staff of the Los An- 
geles office 



VOLUME '>,'], NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



147 



Total vols : 500 ; Pams : 5,000 

New titles : varies ; VF drawers : 60 

Subs : Mags : 200 ; Newsp : 7 

Expenditures : $400 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions ; various types 
of research reports and projects; pic- 
ture searches 

GARDENA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1301 W. 182 St. Gardena. 
(Los Angeles city schools). 

THE GARRETT CORP., AIRE- 
SEARCH MANUFACTURING DIV. 
LIBRARY. 9851-9951 Sepulveda Blvd., 
L.A. 45. 

GENERAL PETROLEUM CORP. OF 
CALIFORNIA, TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY. 3655 S. Soto St. (P.O. Box 
2122, Terminal Annex, L.A. 54). 

GEORGE PEPPERDINE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1121 W. 79th St. Mrs. 
Dorothy W. Moore, Acting Libn. 

Bee State and other four-year colleges 
table. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER 
JR. HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 885 
E. 45th St., L.A. 11. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 10860 S. Denker. 
Mrs. Camille Hopmans, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $4,612.92 ; Circ : 29,110 

Total vols : 14,925 ; New : 1,608 

Subs : Mags : 156 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 127 ; Stud : 3,150 ; Grades : 10-12 

GIBSON, DUMM & CRUTCHER 
LAW LIBRARY. 634 S. Spring St., 
L.A. 14. Dudley Stephenson, Libn. 

Staff • 1- 

Total'vois: 14,250 
Not open to public. 

GRANADA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 10535 Zelzah Ave., Gra- 
nada Hills. (Los Angeles city schools). 
Charles W. Dunning, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $11,000 

Total vols : 4,200 ; New : 1,200 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 5 

Stud : 1,850 ; Grades : 10-12 

GRIFFITH JR. HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
I BRARY. 4765 E. 4th St. Ella M. 
Coughlin, Libn. 

; Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Total vols : 8,387 ; New : 662 
Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 73 ; Stud : 1,532 ; Grades : 7-9 



Health Dept. Library. See Public 
Health Library. 

HELMS ATHLETIC FOUNDATION 

LIBRARY. 8760 Venice Blvd., L.A. 

34. W. R. Bill Schroeder, Libn. 

Staff : 3 

Purpose : Sports research 

Total vols : 5,000 ; Pams : 1,000's 

New titles : 500 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Books on all sports, 
all divisions ; museum : trophies, 
awards 

Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : Sports ma- 
terial to press 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : No loans 

Services : Bibliographies ; briefing and 
abstracting ; film library 

HENRY CLAY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 12226 S. Western Ave., 
L.A. 47. Mrs. Beth Breckenridge, 
Libn. 

HENRY T. GAGE JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2880 E. Gage 

Ave., Huntington Park (Los Angeles 

city schools). Virginia H. Womble, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $750 

Total vols : 6,025 ; New : 322 

Subs : Mags : 55 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 35 ; Stud : 710 ; Grades : 7-8 

HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS CORP., 

TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 3717 S. 

Grand Ave., L.A. 7. Adeline Wasser- 

mann, Libn. Tel: Rl 7-4488, ext. 450. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : Serves as information center 
for engineers and technicians 

Total vols : 3,000 ; Pams : 1,500 

VF drawers : 36 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 4 

Special collections : Electronics, naviga- 
tion 

Expenditures : $5,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

HOLLENBECK JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2510 E. Sixth St., L.A. 23. 

HOLLYWOOD SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1521 N. Highland Ave., 
L.A. 28. (Los Angeles city schools). 

HORACE MANN JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 7001 S. St. Andrews PI., 
L.A. 47. 

HUBERT HOWE BANCROFT JR. 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 929 N. 
Las Paimas Ave., Hollywood 38. 



148 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LGS ANGELES— Continued 

HUNTINGTON PARK HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6020 Miles Ave., 
Huntington Park. (Los Angeles city 
schools). 

HYLAND LABORATORIES LI- 
BRARY. 4501 Colorado Blvd., L. A. 
39. Tel: CH 5-84-11. Mrs. Winifred 
Baker, Libn. 

Staff : .5 day libn. 

Purpose : For research and production 
purposes (biologies) 

Total vols : 900 ; Pams : 500 

New titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 52 

Special collections : Immunology, blood 
and blood fractious 

Expenditures : $1,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
lized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 

IMMACULATE HEART COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 2021 N. Western Ave. Sis- 
ter M. Regis, Libn. 

See State and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

IMMACULATE HEART HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5515 Franklin 
Ave., L.A. 28. Sister Mary Angela, 
Libn. 

JACOB A. RllS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 139 W. 69th St., L.A. 3. 

JAMES A. FOSHAY JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3751 S. Harvard 
Blvd., L.A. IS. Elizabeth E. Vaughn, 
Libn. 

JAMES A. GARFIELD HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5101 E. 6th. 
Catherine H. Jones, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,316.02 ; Circ : 16.225 

Total vols : 9,278 ; New : 827 

Subs : Mags : 99 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 98 ; Stud : 2,086 ; Grades : 10-12 

JEWISH COMMUNITY LIBRARY. 
590 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 4. Tel: 
NO 2-8161. 

JOHN ADAMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 151 W. 30th St. Nancy J. 

Nix, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 

Book fund : $1,666.02 

Total vols : 8,616 ; New : 477 

Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 1 » 

Fac : 74 ; Students : 1,533 ; Grades : 7-9 

JOHN BURROUGHS JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 600 S. McCad- 
den PI., L.A. 5. 

JOHN MARSHALL HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3939 Tracy. Mrs. Rose- 
mary E. Fitzpatrick. Libn. 



Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,969.86 ; Circ : 17,372 

Total vols : 10,654 ; New : 572 

Subs : Mags : 123 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 83 ; Stud : 1,780 ; Grades : 10-12 

JOHN MUIR JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5929 S. Vermont Ave., L.A. 
44. Evelyn B. Hedrick, Libn. 

KAISER FOUNDATION HOSPITAL, 

MEDICAL LIBRARY. 4867 Sunset 

Blvd., L.A. 27. Edwin N. Hughes, 

Libn. Tel: NO 3-8411. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : To furnish professional books 
and journals for members of the 
Southern California Permanente Med- 
ical Group 

Total vols : 1,500 

New Titles : 75 

Subs : Mags : 126 

Special collections : Medicine 

Expenditures : $4,244 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

LOEB AND LOEB LAW LIBRARY. 

710 Pacific Mutual Bldg., L.A. 14. 

LOS ANGELES BAPTIST COLLEGE 
AND SEMINARY LIBRARY. 560 S. 
St. Louis St., L.A. 33. Ethel G. Reeve, 
Libn. 

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE, RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 404 S. Bixel, L.A. 54. William 
K. OpDyke, Libn. Tel: HU 2-4010, 
ext. 253. 
Staff : 4 

Purpose : To supply statistical informa- 
tion to the other chamber depart- 
ments and to its members, and the 
public. 
New Titles : 150 ; VF drawers : 35 
Subs : Mags : 9 ; Newsp : 2 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : restricted 

LOS ANGELES CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 855 N. Vermont Ave. T. F. 
Smith, Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries taile. 

LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS, Li- 
brary Section, 1205 W. Pico Blvd., 
L.A. 15. Elizabeth O. Williams, Libn. 

LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS, 
PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. 450 N. 
Grand, L.A. 12. 

LOS ANGELES COLLEGE OF OP- 
TOMETRY LIBRARY. 950 W. Jeffer- 
son Blvd. Mrs. Grace Weiner, Libn. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 



VOLUME 'jj, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



149 



LOS ANGELES CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC AND ARTS LIBRARY. 
8901 Sunset Blvd. Ai^dele Schaub, 
Libn, 

>§ee state and other jour-year colleges 
table. 

LOS ANGELES CO. AIR POLLU- 
TION CONTROL DISTRICT, TECH- 
NICAL LIBRARY. 434 S. San Pedro, 
L.A. 13. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ART IN- 
STITUTE LIBRARY. 2401 Wiishire 
Blvd., L.A. 57. Mrs. Joan Hugo, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
talle. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY CIVIL 
SERVICE COMMISSION LIBRARY. 
222 N. Grand Ave., L.A. 12. Doris L, 
Neale, Libn. Tel: MA 5-3611, ext. 
64312. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : to serve the administrative 
and technical staff of the Civil Serv- 
ice Dept. in connection with the tech- 
nical phases of their work. Services 
are also to be made available to staff 
members of other county departments 
where applicable. 
Total vols : 1,300 ; Pams : 3,500 
New Titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 30 
Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 1 
Special collections : Administrative and 
personnel management, civil sei'vice, 
public administration 
Expenditures : .$535 ; Circ : 7,135 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; film library ; centralized pro- 
curement of publications and subscrip- 
I tions. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY GENERAL 
HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 
1200 N. State St., L.A. 33. Mrs. Ella 
J. Crandali, Libn. Tel: CA 5-3131; 
ext. 1249. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 5 others 
Total vols : 20,000 ; Pams : 250 
I VF drawers : 4 
■ I Subs : Mags : 308 ; Newsp : 1 
) Special collections : Our main subject 

fields are medicine and nursing 
Expenditures : $10,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all medical libraries 

on request 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY HEALTH 
IDEPT., JOHN L. POMEROY ME- 
iMORIAL LIBRARY. 241 N. Fiqueroa 

St., L.A. 27. Tel: MA 5-3611, ext. 

64029. Agnes Imbria, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 



Purpose : To circulate material on pub- 
lic health subjects 

Total vols : 5,929 ; Pams : 5,000 

New Titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 9 

Subs : Mags : 175 

Expenditures : ,$1,.548.83 ; Circ : 20,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. 301 W. First St., L.A. 12. 
Forrest S. Drummond, Libn. 

Staff : 57 ; Income : $593,276 
Circ : 38,108 

Total vols : 363,862 ; New : 13,075 
Subs : Mags : 4,045 
Open to public 

Branches : Glendale, Long Beach, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona and Santa Monica 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MEDICAL 
ASSOCIATION LIBRARY. 634 So. 
Westlake Ave., L.A. 57. Tel: HU 3- 
4555. John M. Connor, Libn. 

Staff : 6 libns ; 7 others 

Purpose : to provide an effective medi- 
cal library service to the membership 
and the rest of the medical commu- 
nity of Southern California 

Total vols : 84,160 

New Titles : 2,352 ; VF drawers : 17 

Subs : Mags : 822 

Special collections : Osleriana, Medical 
Californiana, History of Medicine, 
Medical and Surgical Instrument Mu- 
seum 

Expenditures : $19,750 ; Circ : 29,-500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM 
LIBRARY. Exposition Park, L.A. 7. 
Tel: Rl 8-2194. Mrs. Dorothy E. Mar- 
tin, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : Reference and research for 
staff and public 

Total vols : 50,000 ; Pams : 50,000 

New titles : 475 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 1,000 

Special collections : Southwest history, 
biological sciences, paleontology, an- 
thropology, art history 

Expenditures : $7,600 ; Circ : 1,800 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Photocopying ; centralized 
procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 



i 



150 



(EWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LOS ANGELES— Continued 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 322 S. Broadway, L.A. 53. 
John D. Henderson, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except : Alham- 
bra, Arcadia, Azusa, Beverly Hills, 
Burbank, Covina, Dairy Valley, 
Downey, El Segundo, Glendale, Glen- 
dora. Industry, Irwindale, Long 
Beach, Los Angeles, Monrovia, Mon- 
terey Park, Pasadena, Pomona, Re- 
dondo Beach, San Marino, Santa Fe 
Springs, Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, 
Signal Hill, South Pasadena, Vernon, 
Whittier, and Altadena and Palos 
Verdes Library Districts. Rolling 
Hills and Rolling Hills Estates in- 
cluded in Palos Verdes Library Dis- 
trict 

Affiliated -with : Torrance Public Library 

Outlets : 221 

Branches and Stations : Region I : Lan- 
caster,* Littlerock, NewhaU, Quartz 
Hill, Palmdale, Roosevelt, San Fer- 
nando * ; Region II : Culver City,* 
El Marino, Imperial, Hawthorne,* 
Inglewood,* Lennox,* Morningside 
Park, San Vicente, Sepulveda, View 
Park, Wiseburn, Woodcrest ; Region 
III : Carson,* Dominguez, Gardena, 
Hermosa Beach, Lawndale, Lomita, 
Manhattan Beach,* Manhattan 
Heights, West Gardena,* Victoria 
Park, Villa Carson ; Region IV : 
Bell,* Compton,* East Compton, En- 
terprise, Florence, Graham, Holly- 
dale, Huntington Park,* Lynwood,* 
Maywood, South Gate,* Willowbrook ; 
Region V : Artesia, Avalon, Bell- 
flower, Bloomfield, Friendly Hills,* 
Lakewood,* La Mirada, Norwalk,* 
Paramount, South Whittier ; Region 
VI: Bandini, Bella Vista, Bell Gar- 
dens, Belvedere, City Terrace, East 
Los Angeles, Los Nietos, Maravilla, 
Montebello, Pico, Rivera, Sorensen, 
Stephenson ; Region VII : El Monte, 
Garvey, La Canada,* Live Oak, 
Mountain View, Norwood, Rosemead, 
San Gabriel,* South San Gabriel, 
Sunnyslope, Temple City* ; Region 
VIII: Baldwin Park,* Charter Oak, 
Claremont,* Duarte,* Hacienda, La 
Puente,* La Verne, San Dimas, Sun- 
kist,* Walnut, West Covina. Institu- 
tions : Camp Acton, County Jail, 
Sybil Brand, John Wesley Hospital, 
Juvenile Hall, Long Beach General 
Hospital, Los Padrinos, Mira Loma, 
Olive View, Rancho Los Amigos, 
Warm Springs, Wayside Honor 
Rancho, Wayside Maximum Security, 
Harbor General Hospital 

Bookmobile stops : 69 community, 36 
school and 10 institution 

LOS ANGELES CO. SUPT. OF 
SCHOOLS, OFFICE OF CURRICU- 
LUM LIBRARY. 808 N. Spring St., 
L.A. Mrs. Dorothy C. Riddell, Libn. 

* Branch status. 



See centralised school library service 
table. 

LOS ANGELES CO. SUPT. OF 
SCHOOLS, SCHOOL LIBRARY 
SERVICE. 739 N. Spring St., L.A. 12. 
IVIrs. Nina E. Britt, Libn. 

See centralized school library service 
table. 

LOS ANGELES EXAMINER LI- 
BRARY. 1111 S. Broadway, L.A. 54. 
Jack M. Thompson, Libn. 

Staff : 11 

Purpose : Service to reporters, editors 
and editorial writers with clippings, 
photographs, pamphlets, negatives, 
metal cuts, and background reference 

Total vols : 750 ; Pams : 1,000 

VF drawers : 1,559 

Special collections : 1,559 drawers of 
millions of newspaper clippings, 
photos, negatives, metal cuts 

Expenditures : $500 ; Cire : 21,900 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Only by order of 
Editor-in-Chief 

Services : film library 

LOS ANGELES METROPOLITAN 
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS LIBRARY. 
1601 S. Olive. Mrs. Carmela Corey, 
Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

LOS ANGELES PACIFIC COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 625 Coleman Ave., L.A. 42. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

LOS ANGELES PIERCE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 6201 Winnetka Ave., 
Woodland Hills. Mrs. Helene S. Sloat, 
Libn. 

See California junior college libraries 
table. 

Los Angeles Police Department Library. 
See Police Dept. Library. A Division 
of the Municipal Reference Library. 

LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
630 W. Fifth St., L.A. 17. Harold L. 
Hamill, Libn. 

Contracts with : Alhambra, Burbank, 
Glendale, Long Beach and South 
Pasadena. 

Branches: 49 j': 

Stations : 4 

Bookmobile stops : 47 (4 community, 43 

school) 

LOS ANGELES SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4600 W. Olympic Blvd., 
L.A. 19. 

LOS ANGELES STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 5151 State College Dr. 
Wm. R. Eshelman, Libn. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



i 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



151 



LOS ANGELES TIMES LIBRARY. 
202 W. First St., L.A. 53. Romeo Car- 
raro, Libn. 

Staff : 10 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching, photo- 
stat copying 

LOS ANGELES TRADE-TECHNI- 
CAL COLLEGE LIBRARY, 400 W. 
Washington Blvd. Dr. Helen K. 
Earnshaw, Libn. 
Branches : Wiggins Branch, Aircraft 

Branch 
See junior college libraries table. 

LOUIS PASTEUR JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5931 West 18th 
St. H. M. Kunkle, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; I clerk 

Book fund : $2,493.80 ; Cire : 19,146 

Total vols : 6,446 ; New : 715 

Subs : Mags : 83 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 88 ; Stud : 2,132 ; Grades : 7-9 

LOYOLA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1901 Venice Blvd. Philip Conneally, 
S.J., Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $1,100 
Total vols : 9,225 ; New : 441 
Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 4 
Stud: 930; Extended day: 50; Grades 
9-12 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY OF LOS 
ANGELES LIBRARY. 7101 W. 80th 
St. Theodore J. Marshall, Libn. De- 
partmental Libraries: School of Law 
Library. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



LAW SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

1137 S. Grand Ave. Myron Fink, Libn. 

Staff : 2 

Total vols : 33,500 ; New : 2,000 

Subs : Mags : 118 

Not open to public. 

LUTHER BURBANK JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6460 N. Fig- 
ueroa. Toshiko Merita, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,035.57 ; Circ : 11,217 

Total vols : 7,153 ; New : 647 

Subs : Mags : 104 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,458 ; Grades : 7-9 

MANUAL ARTS SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4131 S. Vermont Ave., 
L.A. 37. 

MARKHAM JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1650 E. 104th St., L.A. 2. 
Richard Leonard, Libn. 

MARK TWAIN JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 2224 Walgrove Ave. Mrs. 

Helen Lagerquist, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 4 clerk 

Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 34,000 



Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 80 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades 7-9 

MARLBOROUGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5029 W. 3rd St., L.A. 5. Mrs. 
Dorothy B. Rhodes, Libn. 

MASONIC LIBRARY OF SOUTH- 
ERN CALIFORNIA, LTD. Masonic 
Temple at Pico and Figueroa St. 

METROPOLITAN HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1822 E. Seventh St., L.A. 
21. 

MOTION PICTURE RESEARCH 
COUNCIL, INC. LIBRARY. 6660 
Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38. 

MOUNT CARMEL HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 7011 S. Hoover St., L.A. 
44. 

MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 12001 Chalon Rd. Sister 
Catherine Anita, C.S.J., Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

MOUNT VERNON JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4066 W. 17th St. 

George E. Proust, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,250 ; Circ : 16,222 

Total vols : 9,867 ; New : 695 

Subs : Mags : 116 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 78 ; Stud : 1,954 ; Grades : 7-9 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE LI- 
BRARY. Rm. 803, City Hall, L.A. 12. 

Tel: MA 4-5211, Ext. 3791. Ruth E. 

Palmer, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 6 clerical 

Purpose : Specialized library service to 
government officials and employees 

Total vols : 33,235 ; Pams : 39,898 

New titles : 900 ; VF drawers : 42 

Subs : Mags : 500 ; Newsp : 4 

Special collections : Municipal adminis- 
tration and planning, personnel, fire, 
engineering, recreation, civil service, 
municipal documents 

Circ : 25,178 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 

Note : A department of the Los Angeles 
Public Library with branches in the 
Dept. of Water and Power, the Health 
Dept. and the Police Dept. 

NATHANIEL MARBONNE HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 25425 Walnut St., 
Lomita. (Los Angeles City Schools) 

THE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC INSTI- 
TUTE OF THE STATE DEPART- 
MENT OF MENTAL HYGIENE LI- 
BRARY. UCLA Medical Center, 70O 
Westwood Blvd., L.A. 24. Tel: GR 
8-9711, Ext. 244. Sherry Terzian, Libn. 



152 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LOS ANGELES-Continued 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 part-time 

Purpose: The Professional Staff Li- 
brary is essentially a functional work- 
ing library consisting of basic texts, 
monographs and journals, and selec- 
tions from current publications of spe- 
cific use to the work of the NPI staff 

Total vols : 300 ; Pams : 500 

Subs : Mags : 150 

Special collections : The Behavioral 
Sciences 

Expenditures : $5,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 

OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
1600 Campus Rd. Tyrus G. Harmsen, 
Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

O'MELVENY & MYERS LAW LI- 
BRARY. 433 S. Spring St., L.A. 13. 
Stanley K. Pearce, Libn. 

ORVILLE WRIGHT JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6560 W. 80th St. 
Allie S. Moore, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,263.68 

Total vols : 7,075 ; New : 786 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 64 ; Stud : 1,574 ; Grades : 7-9 

OTIS ART INSTITUTE OF LOS AN- 
GELES COUNTY LIBRARY. (For- 
merly Los Angeles County Art Insti- 
tute). 2401 Wilshire Blvd. Joan Hugo, 
Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

PACIFIC AERONAUTICAL LI- 
BRARY, INSTITUTE OF AERO- 
NAUTICAL SCIENCE. 7660 Beverly 
Blvd., L.A. 36. 

PACIFIC TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH CO. LIBRARY. Rm. 201, 747 
S. Hii! St., L.A. 55. Tel: MA 1-2489. 
Gladys L. Walker, Libn. 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY LI- 
BRARY. 565 N. Larchmont, L.A. 

PALMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10860 Woodbine St., L.A. 34. 
Mrs. Margaret C. Doran, Libn. 

PARAMOUNT PICTURES CORP., 
RESEARCH LIBRARY. 5451 Mara- 
thon St., L.A. 38. Tel: Hollywood 
9-2411. Mrs. Dorothy R. Robinson, 
Libn. 

PEARY JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1415 Gardena Blvd., Gar- 
dena. (Los Angeles City Schools). 
Ethel Swenson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 



Book fund : $2,200 

Total vols : 8,000 

Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 100 ; Stud : 2,500 ; Grades : 7-9 

PHILOSOPHICAL RESEARCH SO- 
CIETY, INC. LIBRARY. 3341 Griffith 
Park Blvd., L.A. 27. 

PHINEAS BANNING HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1500 N. Avalon Blvd., Wil- 
mington (Los Angeles City Schools). 

POLICE DEPT. LIBRARY. A Divi- 
sion of the Municipal Reference Li- 
brary. Rm. 503- B, 150 N. Los Angeles 
St., L.A. 12. Tel: MA 4-5211, Ext. 3288. 
Constance Martois, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 1 clerical 
Purpose : To provide specialized library 
sei'vice to law enforcement personnel 
and other government officials and em- 
ployees 
Total vols : 4,552 ; Pams : 8,818 
New titles : 848 ; VF drawers : 4 
Subs : Mags : 144 ; Newsp : 2 
Special collections : Police administra- 
tion, criminology, and related subjects 
Circ : 13,908 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 
Note : A branch of the Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library 

PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE CO. OF 
AMERICA, BUSINESS, RECREA- 
TION AND FIELD MANAGEMENT 
LIBRARIES. Western Home Office, 
Prudential Square, 5757 Wilshire 
Blvd., L.A. 36. 

PUBLIC HEALTH LIBRARY. A Di- 
vision of the Municipal Reference Li- 
brary. Rm. 701, 111 E. First, L.A. 12. 
Tel: MA 4-5211, Ext. 2136. Josephine 
Herrmann, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 2 clerical 
Purpose : Primary purpose to serve the 
staff of the Los Angeles City Health 
Dept. Also serve other government 
employees, and general public on a 
limited basis. 
Total vols : 10,099 ; Pams : 10,625 
New titles : 600 ; VF drawers : 4 
Subs : Mags : 448 ; Newsp : 3 
Special collections : Public health ad- 
ministration, communicable diseases, 
maternal and child health, public 
health nursing health education nu- 
trition, laboratory methods, environ- 
mental sanitation, and occupational 
health. 
Expenditures : $4,375 ; Circ : 20,981 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 
Note : A branch of the Los Angeles Pub- 
lie Library 



VOLUME '^^'J, NO. i, WINTER, 1 962 



153 



QUEEN OF ANGELS HOSPITAL, 
SCHOOL OF NURSING LIBRARY. 
926 N. Coronado Ter., L.A. 26. Sister 
Mary Concordia, Libn. 

R. L. POLK & CO. OF CALIFORNIA 
LIBRARY. 120 E. Eighth St., L.A. 14. 

RALPH WALDO EMERSON JR. 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1650 Seiby 
Ave. Margaret \A/. Crawford, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 9,500 ; New : 905 

Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades 7-9 

RAMONA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
231 S. Alma Ave. Mary Lou Terry, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $125.07 ; Circ : 70 
Total vols : 692 ; New : 36 
Subs : Mags : 26 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 9 ; Stud : 94 ; Grades : 7-12 

REVERE JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1450 Allenford Ave. E. Clif- 
ford Maxell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; I, clerk 

Book fund : $2,481 ; Circ : 120 a day 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 512 

Subs : Mags : 61 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 80 ; Stud : 2,020 ; Grades : 7-9 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION. 

ECONOMIC RESEARCH LIBRARY. 

555 S. Flower St., L.A. 17. Tel: MA 

9-4111, Ext. 2688. Catherine Anne 

Pearce, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To service company personnel, 
other libraries and the public by re- 
ferral 

Total vols : 1,000 ; Pams : 700 

New titles : 600 ; VF drawers : 16 

Subs : Mags : 500 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Economics of the 
petroleum industry and the West 
Coast 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION, 
LAW LIBRARY. 555 S. Flower St., 

; L.A. 17. Tel: MA 9-4111, Ext. 2414. 

I George Smith, Libn. 

Staff : 3 

Total vols : 6,500 
New titles : 30 
i Subs : Mags : 8 ; Newsp : 4 
! Available to : Co. staff 
\ Interlibrary loan : Restricted 
Services: Bibliographies; photostat 
copying ; briefing and abstracting ; 
film library ; recordings (tape or disc) 

RICHLAND JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARIES. 11330 W. Graham Place, 
L.A. 64. 



ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON JR. 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 725 S. 
Indiana St., L.A. 23. 

SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2111 Griffin Ave. Sister M. 
Jerome, O.P., Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 10,000 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 23 ; Stud : 520 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAINT MARY'S ACADEMY LI- 
BRARY. 3300 W. Slauson Ave. Sister 
Mary Conrad, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns 

Book fund : $856.50 ; Circ : 16,802 

Total vols : 6,768 ; New : 562 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 39 ; Stud : 824 ; Grades : 9-12 

ST. VINCENT'S COLLEGE OF 
NURSING LIBRARY. 262 S. Lake St. 
George Stembera, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 5,677 ; New : 832 
Subs : Mags : 61 

Fac: 20; Stud: 139; Grades: .3-year 
coUege 

SAMUEL GOMPERS JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 234 E. 112th St., 
L.A. 3. Mildred Beadle, Libn. 

SECURITY FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK, RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 124 W. Fourth St., Rm. 680. 
Hilda Butler, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Total vols : 1,152 ; Pams : 1,850 

VF drawers : 27 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 28 

Special collections : Banking and finance ; 
general business ; agriculture ; build- 
ing and real estate 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

SOUTH GATE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 8926 San Vicente Blvd., 
South Gate. (Los Angeles City 
Schools). 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON 
CO. LIBRARY. 301 Edison Bidg., 601 
W. Fifth St., P.O. Box 351, L.A. 53. 

SOUTHWEST MUSEUM LIBRARY, 
Highland Park. Ella L. Robinson, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : For research in anthropology 
(Western Hemisphere), and in West- 
ern Americana, with emphasis on the 
Southwest 

Total vols : 75,000 

VF drawers : 48 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 



154 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



LOS ANGELES— Continued 

SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
LAW LIBRARY. 1121 S. Hill St., L.A. 
15. 

SUN VALLEY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 7330 Bakman Ave., Sun 
Valley. (Los Angeles City Schools). 

SUSAN MILLER DORSEY SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3537 Farmdale 
Ave., L.A. 16. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 450 S. Fickett 
St. Dorothy Johnson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Totals vols : 12,560 ; New : 830 

Subs : Mags : 113 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 104 ; Stud : 2,310 ; Grades : 10-12 

THOMAS A. EDISON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6500 S. Hooper 
Ave., L.A. 1. Robert W. Kwan, Libn. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1319 E. 41st St., 
L.A. 11. 

THOMAS STARR KING JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1400 Myra Ave., 
L.A. 27. 

TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX FILM 
CO., RESEARCH LIBRARY. 10201 W. 
Pico, L.A. 35. Frances C. Richardson, 
Libn. Tel: BR 2-6111. 

Staff : 5 libns ; 2 others 

Purpose : Research for motion picture 
production 

Total vols : 30,000 ; Pams : 300 

New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 270 

Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 5 

Expenditures : $3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

U.S. AIR FORCE TECHNICAL LI- 
BRARY, 1352d MOTION PICTURE 
SQUADRON, LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN 
AIR FORCE STATION. 8935 Wonder- 
land Ave., L.A. 46. Lois H. Alber, 
Libn. 

U.S. ATTORNEY'S LAW LIBRARY. 
616 Federal BIdg., 312 N. Spring St., 
L.A. 12. Muriel L. Merrell, Libn. 
Staff : 1 
Not open to public 

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
WATER RESOURCES BRANCH LI- 
BRARY. 1031 Bartlett BIdg., 215 W. 
Seventh St., L.A. 14. 

UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 11800 Texas Ave., L.A. 25. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 
LOS ANGELES. LIBRARY. 405 Hil- 
gard, L.A. 24. Robert Vosper, Libn. 

Serves : Public for reference 

Special collections : The Sadleir collec- 
tion of nineteenth century English fic- 
tion, the Children's Book Collection, 
Spinoza, Californiana, Western Amer- 
icana, Southern California imprints, 
and manuscripts of California authors 

Branch Libraries : Art, Mrs. Jean 
Moore, Libn; Mary De Wolf, Visual 
Aids Libn ; Biomedical, Louise Dar- 
ling, Libn ; Business Administration, 
Charlotte Georgi, Libn ; Chemistry, 
Mrs. Eva A. Dolbee, Libn ; Education, 
Mrs. Gladys A. Graham, Libn ; Engi- 
neering and Mathematical Sciences, 
Mrs. Johanna Tallman, Libn ; English 
Reading Room, Mrs. Grace Hunt, 
Libn ; Geology, Janet Earnshaw, 
Libn ; Institute of Industrial Rela- 
tions, Edwin Kaye, Libn ; Map, Carlos 
Hagen, Libn ; Music, Gordon Stone, 
Libn ; Oriental, Mrs. Man-Hing Yue 
Mok, Libn ; Physics, Donald Black, 
Libn ; Theater Arts, Mrs. Shirley 
Hood, Libn ; University Elementary 
School, Mrs. Donnarae MacCann, 
Libn. 

See universities table. 



ATOMIC ENERGY PROJECT 

LIBRARY. 10874 Le Conte Ave., L.A. 

24. 



BUREAU OF GOVERN 



MENTAL RESEARCH LIBRARY. 
405 Hilgard Ave., L.A. 24. Tel: BR 
2-6161. Dorothy V. Wells, Libn. 

Staff : 21 libns ; 2 others 

Purpose : Provides information on local 
government, public administration, 
public ownership of water and power, 
planning, social and economic condi- 
tions 

Pams : 105,000 

New titles : 5,300 ; VF drawers : 102 

Subs : Mags : 237 

Special collections : John Randolph 
Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation 
Collection on direct legislation, pro- 
gressive and reform measures, politics 
and government of Los Angeles 

Expenditures : $500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral (reference use 
only) 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; photostat copying 

ELMER BELT LIBRARY. 

1893 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 57. Mrs. 

Kate T. Steinitz, Libn. 

Special collections : Rare books and in- 
cunabula of the History of Medicine ; 
current medical books ; biography of 
physicians. Special collections with 
biographical material : Sir Richard 
Burton, Sir William and Sir Winston 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1902 



155 



Churchill ; D. H. Lawrence ; Whales 
and Whaling ; John W. Draper, and 
others such as current world affairs, 
modern novels. 

ELMER BELT LIBRARY OF 



VINCIANA. Dickson Art Center. Mrs. 
Kate T. Steinitz, Curator. 

Purpose : Research institute and library 
on Leonardo da Vinci and the Renais- 
sance 

Total vols : 1,-300 ; Pams : 2,000 

New titles : 300 

Special collections : Leonardo da Vinci 
and the Renaissance 

Available to : Reference use only 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 

SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 



405 Hilgard Ave., L.A. 24. Louis Pia- 
cenza, Libn. 

Staff : 12, 5 part-time 

Circ: 89,973 

Total vols : 129,505 ; New : 7,470 

Subs : Mags : 2,233 

Open to public 

WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK 

MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 22C5 W. 
Adams Blvd., L.A. 18. Dr. Lawrence 
C. Powell, Dir. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2i others 

Purpose : Graduate students, professors 
and visiting scholars upon application 

Total vols : 61,496 + 5,893 mss 

Pams : 703 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 10 

Subs : Mags : 53 

Special collections : English civilization, 
1640-1750, particularly the Age of 
Dryden ; Oscar Wilde ; Montana his- 
tory 

Available to : Other libraries and public 
by referral 

Interlibrary loan : None 

UNIVERSITY OF JUDAISM, TAN- 
NEBAUM MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 
612 S. Ardmore St., L.A. 5. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CAL- 
IFORNIA LIBRARY. University Park. 
Lewis F. Stieg, Libn. 

Departmental Libraries : Architecture 
and Fine Arts, Dentistry, Education, 
Engineering, Feuchtwanger Memorial, 
Hancock Foundation, Hoose Library 
of Philosophy, Law, Medicine, Music, 
Science, Von KleinSmid Library of 
World Affairs 

iS'ee universities tahle. 

— HANCOCK LIBRARY OF BI- 
OLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY. 
Allan Hancock Fdn., L.A. 7. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY, 

GEORGE H. GUSHING LIBRARY. 
University Park, L.A. 7. Mrs. Giennie 
V. Ward, Libn. 



SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 

University Park, L.A. 7. Riley P. Bur- 
ton, Libn. 

Staff : 5* 

Total vols : 92,500 ; New : 2,100 

Subs : Mags : 400 

Open to public 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE LI- 
BRARY. 2025 Zonal Ave., L.A. 5. Mrs. 
Vilma Proctor, Libn. Tel: CA 5-4531. 
Staff : 4 libns ; 2 others 
Total vols : 41,000 ; Pams : 2,000 
New Titles : 2,500 ; VF drawers : 10 
Subs : Mags : 800 ; Newsp : 4 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Photostat copying 

VENICE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

13000 Venice Blvd. Evelyn H. Lincoln, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

VERDUGO HILLS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 10S25 Plainview Ave., Tu- 
junga (Los Angeles city schools). 
Maryline H. Conrey, Libn. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
CENTER PATIENTS AND MEDI- 
CAL LIBRARIES. Wilshire and Saw- 
telle, L.A. 25. Dorothy E. Nieman, 
Libn, 

VIRGIL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 152 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 4. 
Velma Diazlnfante, Libn. 

WASHINGTON IRVING JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3010 Estara 
Ave., L.A. 65. 

WATER AND POWER DIVISION 
LIBRARY, A Division of the Munici- 
pal Reference Library. 316 W. Second 
St., Box 3669 Terminal Annex, L.A. 
54. Tel: MA 4-4211, ext. 3141. 
Staff : 3 libns ; 4.5 others 
Purpose : Specialized library service to 
the officials and employees of the Los 
Angeles City owned Dept. of Water 
and Power 
Total vols : 14,961 ; Pams : 11,324 
New Titles : 979 ; VF drawers : 34 
Subs : Mags : 390 ; Newsp : 8 
Special collections : Water supply and 
distribution ; electric energy ; river 
development ; atomic energy for elec- 
tric power ; technical periodicals 
Circ : 115,349 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 
Note : A branch of the Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library 



156 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES 



LOS ANGELES— Continued 

WATER AND POWER DEPT. LAW 
LIBRARY. Room 770 Hill Street 
BIdg. Louise M. Corwin, Libn. 

Staff : 4 

Circ : 14 

Total vols : 11,119 ; New : 369 

Subs : Mags : 14 

Not open to public 

WELFARE PLANNING COUNCIL 
LIBRARY, LOS ANGELES REGION. 
733^ Hope St., L.A. 17. Tel: MA dison 
2-1231. Kary Seeney, Libn. 

WESTCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 7400 W. Manchester Ave., 
L.A. 45. 

WESTERN JEWISH INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY. 7269 Beverly Blvd., L.A. 
36. 

WESTERN OIL AND GAS ASSOCI- 
ATION LIBRARY. 609 S. Grand Ave., 
L.A. 14. 

WESTERN PRECIPITATION CORP. 
LIBRARY. 1000 W. Ninth St., P.O. 
Box 2744, Terminal Annex, L.A. 24. 

WESTLAKE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
LIBRARY. 700 N. Faring Rd., L.A. 24. 

WHITE MEMORIAL MEDICAL LI- 
BRARY, Loma Linda University. 1720 
Brooklyn Ave., L.A. 33. Mrs. Mollie 
Sittner, Libn. Tel: AN 9-9131. 

Staff : 4 libns : 4 other 

Purpose : Serve Schools of Medicine, 
Nursing, Dietetics, X-ray Technology 
and Graduate Studies of the Loma 
Linda University as well as the medi- 
cal profession anywhere 

Total vols : 59,633 

New Titles : 2,500 ; VF drawers : 12 

Subs : Mags : 995 ; Newsp : 2 

Expenditures : $14,188.13 ; Circ : 35,564 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All medical libraries 
on request 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying 

WIDNEY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1937 S. Grand Ave., L.A. 16. Mrs. 
Rosalie Serot, Libn. 

WOODROW WILSON HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2839 N. Eastern. 
M. J. Bakjean, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,325 ; Circ : 20,000 

Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 806 

Subs : Mags : 125 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 102 ; Stud : 2,200 ; Grades 7-12 

LOS BANOS (Merced Co.) 

LOS BANOS UNION HIGH SCHOOL. 
P.O. Box 472. Madeline Brandt, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



LOS GATOS (San^a Clara Co.) 

ALMA COLLEGE LIBRARY. Rev. 
John J. Alhadef, Libn. 

LOS GATOS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. High School Court. Mrs. Ro- 
berta Blake, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn; 1 clerk 

Book fund: $4,300; Circ: 10,645 

Total vols: 8,116; New: 1,057 

Subs: Mags: 107; Newsp: 5 

Fac: 61; Stud: 1,260; Grades: 9-12 

LOS GATOS MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 
123 E. Main St. John Schmuck, Libn. 

SACRED HEART NOVITIATE LI- 
BRARY. 



LOS MOLINAS (Tehama Co.) 

LOS MOLINAS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Sherwood at Grant. Mar- 
garet C. Bauer, Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $275 
Total vols : 1,280 ; New : 75 
Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 12 ; Stud : 150 ; Grades : 9-12 



LOS OLiVOS (Santa Barbara Co.) 
MIDLAND SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

LOWER LAKE (Lake Co.) 

LOWER LAKE UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Paul Lathrop, 
Libn. 

LOYALTON (SSerra Co.) 

LOYALTON JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mrs. Rose Mary Dwyer, 
Libn. 

LYNWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) 

HASLER JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 11300 Spruce St. Mrs. M. S. 
Gieason, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 24,005 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 325 

Subs : Mags : 22 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac: 48; Stud: 1,130; Grades: 7-9 

LYNWOOD ACADEMY LIBRARY 
11081 Harris Ave. Aletha H. Fletcher, 
Libn. 

LYNWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 12124 Bulis Rd. (Compton 
city schools). 

WESTERN GEAR CORPORATION 
ENGINEERING LIBRARY. P.O. Box 

192. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



I5t 



McARTHUR (Shasta Co.) 

FALL RIVER HIGH SCHOOL LI 
BRARY. Margraet Porter, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $700 ; Circ : 4,088 

Total vols : 3,178 ; New : 240 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 21 ; Stud : 300 ; Grades : 9-12 



MeCLELLAN (Sacramento Co.) 

U.S. MeCLELLAN AIR FORCE 
BASE, SMAMA Library. Tel: WA 2- 
1511, ext. 3240. Mrs. Gloria E. Kast, 
Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns 

Purpose : Extend professional library 
services to air force, military and civil- 
ian personnel and their dependents. 
Total vols : 17,172 ; Pams : 200 
New Titles : 2,200 ; VF drawers : 2 
Subs : Mags : 361 ; Newsp : 14 
Expenditures : $11,500 ; Circ : 66,452 
Available to : Co. staif, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest. 
Services: Recordings (tape or disc); 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions. 



MADERA CO. SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
6th and I. Rintha Robins, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

MADERA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. Corner 6th and L. Mrs. 

Vivian Wiegand, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 42,000 

Total vols : 11,696 New 1,030 

Subs : Mags : 155 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 82 ; Stud : 1,843 ; Grades : 9-12 



MANHATTAN BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) 

Mira Costa Sigh School Library, see 
under Redondo Beach. 



MANTECA (San Joaquin Co.) 

MANTECA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. East Yosemite St. Ena M. 
Plank, Libn. 



MARCH FiELD (Riverside Co.) 

U.S. MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, 
POST AND TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 
U.S. FIFTEENTH AIR FORCE 
HEADQUARTERS LIBRARY. 



MeCLOUD (Siskiyou Co.] 

McCLOUD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 277. 

McCLOUD LIBRARY. Tel: 8F2. Mrs. 
Margaret Klungness, Libn. 

Staff : 2 

Purpose : To serve the families and per- 
sonnel of the McCloud River Lumber 
Co. 

Total vols : 8,000 ; Pams : 100 

New Titles : 100 

Subs : Mags : 10 ; Newsp : 5 

Circ : 15,600 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 



McFARLAND (Kern Co.) 

McFARLAND HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Sherwood Ave. Marie C. 
Lourenzo, Libn. 



I MADERA (Madera Co.) 

iMADERA COUNTY FREE Ll- 
* BRARY. 135 W. Yosemite. James A. 
jPetrella, Libn. 
I Serves : Entire county 
j Outlets: 11 
j Branches: Chowchilla 
I Stations : Ahwahnee, Central Camp, 
; Coarsegold, North Fork, Oakhurst, 
O'Neals, Raymond, South Madera 

iMADERA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

! Courthouse. 



MARE SSLAND (Solano Co.) 

U.S. NAVAL SHIPYARD TECHNI- 
CAL LIBRARY. Industrial Lab. BIdg. 
Tel: 4-1111, Ext. 3614. Maggie Carson, 
Libn. 

U.S. NAVY, RODMAN LIBRARY. 

Code 810L — Mare Island Naval Ship- 
yard. Tel: Ml 4-1111, Ext. 3632. Mrs. 
Jean C. Cline, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2 part-time 
Purpose : To provide a general library 
collection for navy and military per- 
sonnel and dependents for educational 
and cultural reading, reference and to 
supplement the training programs on 
the shipyard 
Total vols : 21,940 
New titles : 1,368 
Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 16 
Special collections : Naval history 
Expenditures : $2,300 ; Circ : 30,912 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Bibliographies ; briefing and 
abstracting; recordings (tape or disc) 

MARICOPA (Kern Co.) 

MARICOPA UNIFIED SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 818. Elizabeth Hill, Libn. 



MARIPOSA (Mariposa Co.) 

MARIPOSA COUNTY HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Merle A. Sheaf- 
fer, Libn. 



158 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



MARIPOSA— Continued 

MARIPOSA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

MARIPOSA CO. SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 1134. Mrs. Nola L. 
Bonnell, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries taile. 

MARIPOSA CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. 



MARKLEEV3LLE (Alpme Co.) 

ALPINE CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 



MARTINEZ (Contra Costa Co.) 

ALHAMBRA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Helen Cushman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,700 ; Circ : S.820 

Total vols : 4,822 ; New : 559 

Subs : Mags : 69 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 57 ; Stud : 1,150 ; Grades : 9-12 

CONTRA COSTA CO. LAW LI- 
BRARY. Hall of Records. Mrs. Chris- 
tine D. Cox, Libn. 

CONTRA COSTA CO. SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. 1750 Oak Park Blvd. Walter 
H. Harris, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries tahle. 

CONTRA COSTA CO. TEACHERS 
LIBRARY. Bryan O. Wilson, Co. Supt. 

MARTINEZ JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Court and Warren St. Mrs. 
Elizabeth P. Talt, Libn. 

SHELL OIL COMPANY RESEARCH 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 711. Tel: AC 
8-6161, Ext. 124. Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Frazer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : General library service of all 
kinds, to all technical personnel of the 
Research Dept. 

Total vols : 3,000 ; Pams : 10,000 

New titles : 50-100 ; VF drawers : 200 

Subs : Mags : 150 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



MARYSVI2.LE (Yuba Co.) 

LINDA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 600 Pasado Ave. Donna 
B. Dempsey, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries tahle. 

MARYSVILLE CITY LIBRARY. 301 
Fourth St., P.O. Box 991. Thelma G. 
Neavilie, Libn. 



MARYSVILLE UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 18th and B Sts. 
Mrs. Anna B. Cook, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Giro : 18,704 

Total vols : 6,519 ; New : 462 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 58 ; Stud. 1,400 ; Grades : 9-12 

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 715 C St. 

U.S. BEALE AIR FORCE BASE LI- 
BRARY. Tel: ST 8-2231. Robert C. 
Johnston, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 2 others 
Purpose : to provide a professionally op- 
erated library service for air force, 
civilian, and dependent personnel. 
Total vols : 18,000 ; Pams : 1,-500 
New Titles : 1,500 ; VF drawers : 2 
Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 8 
Expenditures : $8,000 ; Circ : 52,500 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

YUBA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 18th 
and B Sts. Robert H. Staehiin, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries taile. 

YUBA CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

YUBA CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 9th 
and E Sts. Jack C. Lawson, Libn. 

See centralized school libra7-ies table. 



MATHER FIELD (Sacramento Co.) 

U.S. MATHER AIR FORCE BASE 
LIBRARY. Tel: EM 3-3161, ext. 2752. 
Evelyn E. Altman, Libn. 

Staff : 5 

Purpose : To serve military and civilian 
personnel assigned to Mather Air 
Force Base. 

Total vols : 22,000 ; Pams : 200 

VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 200 ; Newsp : 6 

Expenditures : $8,000 ; Circ : 58,843 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting. 



MENDOCINO (Mendocino Co.) 

MENDOCINO STUDY CLUB LI- 
BRARY. Lansing St. Mrs. Thorkild 
Thomsen, Libn. 
Staff : 3 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



159 



Purpose : To provide reading material 
for a large area still not served by 
any city or county library system. 

Total vols : 4.300 ; Pams : 100 

New Titles : 300 

Subs : Mags : 1 

Expenditures : $190 ; Circ : 4,000 

MENDOCINO UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $50 ; Circ : 2,000 

Total vols : 2,500 ; New : 100 

Subs : Mags : 10 ; Newsp : 2 

Fae : 10 ; Stud : 180 ; Grades 7-12 



MENLO PARK (San Mateo Co.) 

CONVENT OF THE SACRED 
HEART LIBRARY. Valparaiso Ave. 
Mother C. Welch, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,800 ; Circ : 40,000 
Total vols : 27,909 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 43 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac : 20 ; Stud : 493 

MENLO PARK MUNICIPAL LI- 
BRARY. Civic Center. Philip G. Mo- 
rales, Libn. 
Affiliated with : San Mateo Co. F. L. 

MENLO PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
555 Glenwood Ave. Naoma B. Knight, 

Libn. 

See centralized, school libraries taile. 

I MENLO SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 
I LIBRARY. Alec Ross, Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries table. 

ST. PATRICK'S SEMINARY LI- 
BRARY. Middlefield Road. 

STANFORD RESEARCH INSTI- 
jTUTE LIBRARY. 333 Ravenswood 
'Ave. Tel: DA 6-6200, ext. 2637. V. 
i Lorraine Pratt, Libn. 

I Staff : 30 

'' Purpose : Company Library — Serves 
staff of not-for-profit research insti- 
tute 

(Total vols: 20,000; Pams: 20,000; 

; Reports : 64,000 
New Titles : 3,-500 
Subs : Mags : 1,300 ; Newsp : 5 
Special collections : Areas covered : En- 
gineering, Economics and Manage- 
ment Sciences, Physical and Life Sci- 
ences 

i Circ : 12,150 

!i Available to: Co. staff, other libraries 

I and public by referral 

I Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 

' quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; Xerox copying ; briefing and 
abstracting ; film library ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions 



SUNSET MAGAZINE REFERENCE 
LIBRARY. Lane Publishing Co. Bldg. 

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LI- 
BRARY, MENLO PARK SECTION. 

345 Middlefield Rd., Tel: DA 5-6761. 

Eleanore E. Wilkins, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 6 others 

Total vols : 70,000 ; Pams : 5,000 

New titles : 10,000 

Subs : Mags : 300 

Special collections : Geology and re- 
lated sciences 

Circ : 7,500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loans : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching 



MERCED (Merced Co.) 

MARIPOSA COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 2125 M St. Marian R. Mar- 
vin, Libn. 

Distributing agencies listed under Mer- 
ced Co. Free Library. 

MERCED CITY SCHOOLS CEN- 
TRAL LIBRARY. 23rd & L Sts. Mrs. 
Florence E. Pitts, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

MERCED COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 2125 M St. Marian R. Mar- 
vin, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county and Mariposa 
County 

Contracts with : Mariposa County 

Outlets : 26 

Stations : Amsterdam, Atwater, Ballico, 
Cressey, Delhi, Dos Palos, El Nido, 
Gustine, Irwin, Le Grand, Living- 
ston, Los Banos, Museum, Planada, 
Snelling, South Dos Palos, Stevin- 
son, Winton, Bear Valley, El Portal, 
Mariposa, Midpines, Red Cloud, Wood- 
lands, Tosemite. 

MERCED CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
County Courts Bldg. Robert B. Bax- 
ter, Libn. 

MERCED CO. SUPT. OF SCHOOLS 
OFFICE LIBRARY. 22nd and O St. 
Mildred Eshnaur, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

MERCED CO. TEACHERS' LI- 
BRARY. 

MERCED ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 
LIBRARY. 555 W. 22nd St. Mrs. Flor- 
ence E. Pitts, Libn. 

MERCED HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
19th and G Sts. Mrs. Valreete Robin- 
son, Libn. 



6 — 54336 



160 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



MERCED— Continued 

U.S. CASTLE AIR FORCE BASE LI- 
BRARY. Rosa E. Worth, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libu. ; 4 others 

Purpose : To serve all military, civilians 
and their dependents on Base 

Total vols : 16,000 ; Pams : 500 

New titles : 1,500 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 15 

Special collections : Californiana ; escape 
and evasion 

Expenditures : $6,000 ; Circ : 48,000 

Available to : Base staff 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies; recordings (disc) 



MIDOLITOWN (Lake Co.) 

MIDDLETOWN LIBRARY. Gibson 
Library BIdg. 

Note: Supported iy dues and donations. 

MIDDLETOWN UNIFIED SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. Box 338. 

Fac : 14 ; Stud : 260 ; Grades 1-12 



MILL VALLEY (Marin Co.) 

GOLDEN GATE BAPTIST THEO- 
LOGICAL SEMINARY LIBRARY. 
Strawberry Drive Point. A. J. Hyatt, 
Libn. 

See State and other Four-Year Colleges 
taile. 

iVlILL VALLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
52 Lovell Ave. Mrs. Dorothy M. 
Thomas, Libn. 

TAMALPAIS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. County Road. Sidney 
Thompson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i time 

Book fund : $2,300 ; Circ : 1,785 

Totals vols : 10,300 ; New : 547 

Subs : Mags : 103 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 67 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 9-12 



MiLLBRAE (San Mateo Co.) 

MILLS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
400 Murchison Dr. Mrs. Eleanor E. 
Purpus, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $6,500 ; Circ : 11,600 

Total vols : 5,400 ; New : 1,700 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 7 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 10-12 



MBLPITAS (Santa Clam Co.) 

MILPITAS SCHOOL DISTRICT. 50 
N. Abbott. Frances Henry, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries tahle. 

SAMUEL AYER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1331 Calaveras Rd. Florence 
M, Damm, Libn. 



MSRANDA (Humboldt Co.) 

SOUTH FORD JR. -SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Elizabeth 
E. Smith, Libn. 

MlSSIOr^ SAN JOSS (Alames^ci Co.) 

QUEEN OF THE HOLY ROSARY 
COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

MODESTO (St£8B^islaus Co.) 

GRACE M. DAVIS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1200 Rumble Rd. Zarah 
Virgin, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk (library service 

began 2-1-61) 
Circ : 3,179 

Total vols : 1,804 ; New : 1,804 
Newsp : 2 
Fac : 25 ; Stud : 401 ; Grades : 9-12 

McHENRY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1402 
I St. Carl W. Hamilton, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Stanisalus Co. F. L. 
Stations : 1 

MODESTO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1st and H Sts. Helen Hart- 
wich, Libn. 

MODESTO JR. COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
College Ave. Helen F. Pierce, Libn. 

See California junior college libraries 
table. 

MODESTO STATE HOSPITAL LI- 
BRARY. Blue Gum Ave. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Huxtable, Libn. 

SHELL AGRICULTURAL LABORA- 
TORY LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1531. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 1402 Eye St. Carl W. Ham- 
ilton, Libn. 

Serves : entire county 

Affiliated with: McHenry P. L. and 
Turlock P. L. 

Outlets : 61 

Stations : Ceres, Denair, Empire, Hugh- 
son, Keyes, Newman, Oakdale, Pat- 
terson, Riverbank, Salida, Silver- 
thorn, Valley Home, Waterford 

Bookmobile stops : 46 •■ 

Schools : 18 '^ 

STANISLAUS CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse, P.O. Box 854. 

STANISLAUS CO. SCHOOL OF- 
FICE, INSTRUCTIONAL MATE- 
RIALS DEPT. LIBRARY. 2115 Scenic 
Drive. Mrs. Ida May Edwards, Co- 
ordinator, Helen Thornton, Libn. 

THOMAS DOWNEY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1000 Coffee Rd. Mrs. Mil- 
dred M. Campbell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,822.68 ; Circ : 33,017 i 

Total vols : 10,036 ; New : 909 I 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 120 ; Stud : 2,361 ; Grades : 9-12 



i 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



161 



MOFFETT FIELD (Santa Clara Co.) 

AMES AERONAUTICAL LABORA- 
TORY LIBRARY 

MONROVIA (Los AngeBes Co.) 

MONROVIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

321 So. Myrtle Ave. Mrs. Katherine 
Ainsworth, Libn. 

MONROVIA - DUARTE UNION 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. Colorado 

at Madison. 

MONTEBELLO (Los Angeles Co.) 

BELL GARDENS JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5841 Live Oak 
St., Bell Gardens (Montebeilo city 
schools) Myrtis G. Lucas, Libn. 

Staff: llibn; 1 clerk 

r.ook fund : $2,650' ; Circ : 10,000 

TMt;il vols: 9,000; New: 750 

Rnlis : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,350 ; Grades : 7-9 

BELL GARDENS SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6119 E. Agra St., 
Beil Gardens (Montebeilo city schools) 

CANTWELL HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 

IBRARY. 329 N. Garfield Ave. 

IeASTMOUNT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 400 N. Bradshaw. 

JMONTEBELLO JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
I LIBRARY. 1600 Whittier Blvd. 

IMONTEBELLO SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
! LIBRARY. 2100 W. Cleveland Ave. 
jMrs. Gertrude F. Hoopes, Libn. 

JmONTEBELLO UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. 123 S. Monte- 
beilo Blvd. Lois M. Miller, Libn. 

tS'ee centralized school liiraries table. 

jVIO^i?CLAiR (San Bernardino Co.) 

MONTCLAIR HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4725 Benito St. Mrs. Alma 
B. Polk, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 3 clerks 
Book fund: $40,000 for 1959-1962 es- 
tablishing a new library ; Circ : 13,300 
Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 3,000 
Subs: Mags: 200; Newsp: 6 
Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,218 ; Grades : 9-12 

I MOMTEREY (Monterey Co.) 

ImONTEREY PENINSULA COL- 
jLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1231. Mar- 
garet W. Thompson, Libn. 
\8ee Junior College Libraries table. 

MONTEREY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
P.O. Box 1448. Ethel M. Solliday, 
Libn. 

Bookmobile stops: 20 communities, 6 
school 



MONTEREYUNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Herrmann Dr. Ora Gil- 
lette, Libn. 

StafP : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3,000 
Total vols : 11,000 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 92 ; Stud : 1,600 

U.S. ARMY LANGUAGE SCHOOL, 
RESEARCH LIBRARY. Tel: FR 
5-1511, ext. 255. Tatiana S. Lambrin, 
Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : The mission of the library is 
to provide authoritative and reliable 
reference material for study and re- 
search, as well as recreational read- 
ing in many languages to students, 
faculty and staff of the school 

Total vols : 13,484 

New titles : 700 ; VF drawers : 10 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Foreign languages ; 
linguistics ; history and culture of for- 
eign countries 

Expenditures : $4,000 ; Circ : 10,225 

Available to : Staff and students, other 
libraries and public 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



FORT ORD LIBRARY SYS- 
TEM, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY 
BRANCH. Margaret Halstead, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 
Purpose : To provide general library 
service to any service-connected per- 
sonnel in the area and to provide, as 
well, background and reference mate- 
rial for the Army Language School 
students (28 languages) at the Pre- 
sidio 
Total vols : 8,-500 ; Pams : 500 
New Titles : 600 
Subs : Mags : 47 ; Newsp : 6 
Expenditures : $2,800 ; Circ : 46,450 
Available to : Co. staff 
Interlibrary loan : restricted 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; recordings — disc. ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions 

U.S. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Prof. George R. 
Luckett, Dir. 

Special Library: Buckley Library (Sea 
and Naval History) 



MOMTEREY PARK (Los Angeles Co.) 

BRUGGEMEYER MEMORIAL LI- 
BRARY. 318 S. Ramona Ave. George 
K. Anang, Libn. 

Bookmobile stops : 115 
Schools : 4 



162 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



MOORPARK (Ventura Co.) 

MOORPARK MEMORIAL UNION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. Casey Rd. 
Mrs. Ruth T. Whitaker, Libn. 

Staff : i libn ; 7 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 5,500 
Total vols : 2,478 ; New : 204 
Subs : Mags : 24 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 15 ; Stud : 300 ; Grades : 9-12 



MORGAN HILL (Sanfa Clara Co.) 

LIVE OAK UNION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 30 W. Central Ave. Jer- 

aldine Medo, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,600 ; Oirc : 7,358 

Total vols : 3,750 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 53 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 33 ; Stud : 650 ; Grades : 9-12 



MORRO BAY (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

MORRO BAY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. J. P. Fentzling, Libn. 

Staff: 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $2,400 

Total vols : 1,250 ; New : 775 

Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 25 ; Stud : 485 ; Grades 7-11 



MOUNT HAMILTON (Santa Clara Co.) 

LICK OBSERVATORY LIBRARY 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALI- 
FORNIA. Mr. S. Vasilevskis, Chief 
Libn. and Astronomer and Mrs. C. M. 
Watson, Libn. 



MOUNT SHASTA (Siskiyou Co.) 

MOUNT SHASTA HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Eugenia Astmann, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $2,700 ; Circ : 2,000 

Total vols : 2,100 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 15 ; Stud : 220 ; Grades 9-12 



MOUNTAIN VIEW (Santa Clara Co.) 

MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. P.O. Box 640. Mrs. Lillian 

Virgin, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 12,827 

Total vols : 8,243 ; New : 858 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 72 ; Stud : 1,361 ; Grades 9-12 

MOUNTAIN VIEW PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 585 Franklin St. Mrs. Edith 
E. Duke, Libn. 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
Rev. Cornelius J. Burns, Libn. 

See state and other four-pear colleges 
table. 



SYLVANIA ELECTRONIC DE- 
FENSE LABS. LIBRARY. P.O. Box 
205. Tel: YO 8-6211, ext. 2153. Roy A. 
Johnson, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 6 others 

Purpose : Provide library and docu- 
ments services (including control of 
classified material) to laboratory per- 
sonnel in support of research and de- 
velopment programs 

Total vols : 4,000 ; Pams : 1,000 

New Titles : 30 ; Documents : 35,000 

Subs : Mags : 315 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections: Collection prima- 
rily in electronics field. Special fea-| 
tures : Infrared, tactical warfare 

Expenditures : $7,500 ; Circ : 24,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- ' 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



NAPA (Napa Co.) 

GOODMAN LIBRARY. 1219 1st St. 
Mrs. Ella W. Miller, Libn. 
Bookmobile stops : 6 community 

NAPA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 

1201 Franklin St. Mrs. Dorothy Dona- 
hoe, Libn. 

Serves : entire county except Napa, Cal- 
istoga, St. Helena 

Outlets : 24 

Stations : Aetna, Bar-49, Boys Camp, 
Browns Valley, Calistoga School, 4-H 
Camp, Lodi, Napa Junction, Rose- 
mont, Rutherford, Salvador, Sanita- 
rium, Spanish Flat, Tountville 

Bookmobile stops : 9 

Schools : 3 

NAPA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY, 

Courthouse. 

Total vols : 10,000 

Subs : Mags : 2 

Not open to public. 

Remarks : The library is managed by 
the judges and kept up by the court's 
secretary. It is solely for the use of 
the Bar and is only for reference 
work 

NAPA JR. COLLEGE LIBRARY. Jef- 
ferson at Park Aves. Virginia Borges, 
Libn. 
See Junior College Libraries table. 

NAPA CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
1005 Jefferson St. Mrs. Lila Macway, 
Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 

NAPA PUBLIC LIBRARY. See Good- 
man Library. 

NAPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Jefferson St. Alice M. Mc- 
Mahon, Libn. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



163 



REDWOOD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3600 Oxford St. Mrs. Fores 
Crandall, Libn. 
Stafe : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,400 ; Circ : 32,295 
Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 673 
Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 57 ; Stud : 1,325 ; Grades : 7-10 

RIDGEVIEW JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Old Sonoma Rd. Alice Baker, 

Libn 

Stafe": 1 libn ; ^ clerk 

Book fund : $1,800 ; Circ : 18,000 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 666 

Subs : Mags : 106 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 54 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 7-10 



Staff : 1 teacher-libn. 
Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 400 
Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 250 
Subs : Mags : 32 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 9 ; Stud : 87 ; Grades : 9-12 



NEWBURY PARK (Ventura Co.) 

NEWBURY PARK ACADEMY LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 77. 



NEWHALL (S.OS Angeles Co.) 

WILLIAM S. HART UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 24825 N. New- 
hall Ave. 



NATIONAL CITY (San Diego Co.) 

GRANGER JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2101 Granger Ave. Mary E. 
I Kurtz, Libn. 

I Staff: 1 libn 

IBook fund: $3,000; Circ: 10,687 
i Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 800 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 2 
JFac : 34 ; Stud : 865 ; Grades : 7-9 

InaTIONAL CITY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
I LIBRARY. 1701 D.Ave. 

NATIONAL CITY PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 200 E. 12th St. Mrs. Ellen 
Badder, Libn. 

Outlets : 9 schools 

SWEETWATER UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 290O Highland 
Ave. Mrs. Evelyn H. Fegan, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
JBook fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 15,843 
(Total vols : 6,007 ; New : 851 
I Subs : Mags : 106 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 49 ; Stud : 1,164 ; Grades : 10-12 



NEEDLES (Sen Bernardino Co.) 

NEEDLES JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Washington St. 

NESTOR (San Diego Co.) 

SOUTHWEST JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2700 Iris St. 

NEVADA CITY (Nevada Co.) 

NEVADA CITY FREE LIBRARY. 
North Pine St. Mrs. Esther M. Mc- 
Cluskey, Libn. 

JNEVADA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

InEVADA UNION JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 633 Zion St. 

\ NEW CUYAMA (Santa Barbara Co.) 

CUYAMA VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Highway 166. Virginia 
Maw, Libn. 



NEWMAN (Stanislaus Co.) 

ORESTIMBA UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Lillian Ander- 
sen, Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn. 
Book fund : $900 ; Circ : 2,465 
Total vols : 3,165 ; New : 191 
Subs : Mags : 69 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 16 ; Stud : 785 ; Grades : 9-12 



NEWPORT BEACH (Orange Co.) 

AERONUTRONIC LIBRARY, Divi- 
sion of Ford Motor Co. Ford Rd. Tel: 
OR 5-1234, ext. 1301. Dr. L. H. Linder, 
Manager, Technical Information 
Services. 

Staff : 6 libns ; 13 others 
Purpose : To provide scientific, techni- 
cal and management information to 
Aeronutronic personnel. 
Total vols: 9,300; Pams : 750; Tech. 

Kept : 36,000 ; Serials : 2,800 
New Titles : 3,000 ; VF drawers : 7 
Subs : Mags : 460 ; Newsp : 14 
Expenditures: $65,000; Circ: 33,500 
Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

NEWPORT BEACH PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 216 Island Ave. Mrs. Doro- 
thea Sheely, Libn. 
Branches : 1 
Stations : 1 
Schools : 4 

NEWPORT HARBOR HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 600 Irvine. 



NORTH HIGHLANDS (Sacramento Co.) 

DON JULIO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6444 Walerga Rd. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund: $700; Circ: 17,216 
Total vols : 3,295 ; New : 169 
Subs : Mags : 29 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 35 ; Stud : 850 ; Grades : 7-9 



164 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



NORTH HIGHLANDS— Continued 

HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6601 Guthrie Way. Terry 
Kastanis, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 13,500 

Total vols : 5,226 ; New : 350 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,450 ; Grades : 10-12 



NORTH HOLLYWOOD (Los Angeles Co.) 

BENDIX AVIATION CORP. TECH- 
NICAL LIBRARY. 11600 Sherman 
Way 

HARVARD SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
3700 Coldwater Canyon. Arthur L. 
Howard, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 3,000 
Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 1,010 
Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac: 30; Stud: 300; extended 41; 
Grades : 7-12 

MADISON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 13000 Hart St. Ruby D. 
Edenquist, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,945.56 ; Circ : 28,593 

Total vols : 6,213 ; New : 889 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 93 ; Stud : 2,288 ; Grades : 7-9 

NORTH HOLLYWOOD SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5231 Colfax 
Ave., N. Hollywood (Los Angeles city 
schools) 

REED JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4525 Irvine St., N. Holly- 
wood (Los Angeles city schools) 
V. Y. Kasiman, Libn. 



NORTHRSDGE (Los Angeles Co.) 

NORTHRIDGE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 17960' Chase. 

RIKER LABORATORIES, INC. LI- 
BRARIES. 19901 Nordhoff St. Tel: 
Dl 1-1300, ext. 266. Mrs. Janet C. 
Adams, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 5 others 

Purpose : Research in connection with 
the development and manufacture of 
new drugs. 

Total vols: 5,000; Pams : 600 

VF drawers : 12 

Subs : Mags : 512 ; Newsp : 12 

Special collections : Chemische Berichte 
from 1,800 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; film library ; re- 
cordings (tape or disc) ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions ; translations. 



SAN FERNANDO VALLEY STATE 
COLLEGE LIBRARY. 18111 Nordhoff 
St. Stanley McElderry, Libn. 

See state and other four-year col 
table. 



WORTH SACRAMENTO (Sacrsamenfo Co.) 

LAS PALMAS JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 577 Las Palmas Ave. 
Willa Comstock, Libn. 

NORTE DEL RIO HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3051 N. Fairfield St. Mrs. 
Ruth N. Smith, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,750 ; Circ : 17,505 

Total vols : 6,699 ; New : 348 

Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 59 ; Stud : 1,158 ; Grades : 10-12 

NORTH SACRAMENTO SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. 670 Dixieanne 
Ave. Genevieve Walker, Libn. 

RIO TIERRA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3201 Northstead Dr. Mrs. 
Doris E. Hubiak, Libn. 



^30RWALK (L©s AngeEes C©.) 

CERRITOS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
11110 E. Alondra Blvd. Carl Johnson, 
Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

EXCELSIOR HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 15711 S. Pioneer. Mrs. June 
Nelson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $2,400 ; Circ : 20,615 

Total vols : 10,822 ; New : 453 

Subs : Mags : 186 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 86 ; Stud : 1,869 ; Grades : 9-12 

METROPOLITAN STATE HOSPI- 
TAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 11400 
Norwalk Blvd. Tel: UN 4-3721, ext. 
295. Mrs. Constance S. Cozens, Libn. i 
Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : To provide current reading 
material mainly on psychiatry, psy- 
chology, and social work for hospital 
staff 
Total vols : 2,100 ; Pams : 750 
New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 5 
Subs : Mags : 79 ; Newsp : 2 
Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : 3,000 
Available to : Co. staff 
Interlibrary loan : library too small to 
answer any interlibrary loan requests 

METROPOLITAN STATE HOSPI- 
TAL, Patients' Library. 11400 Nor- 
walk Blvd. G. Calvin Tooker, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Serve hospital patients 
Total vols : 2,800 
New titles : 200 
Subs : Mags : 48 : Newsp : 4 
Expenditures : $750 
Available to : patients and hospital staff J 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



165 



NORWALK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 11356 E. Leffingwell. Mrs. 
Francis MacEwan, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 
Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 19,744 
Total vols : 6,750 ; New : 1,509 
Subs : Mags : 77 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 89 ; Stud : 2,035 ; Grades : 9-12 



MOVATO (fVlairiin Co.) 

NOVATO H!GH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
625 Arthur St. Peter S. Hartmus, Libn. 

OAKDALE (Stcesilslaus Co.) 

OAKDALE JT. UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 68. 

Gladys B. Whitney, Libn. 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 10,000 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 350 

Subs : Mags : 119 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 57 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 9-12 



OAKLAND (Aicsmedea Co.) 

ALAMEDA CO. HEALTH DEPART- 
MENT. 499 5th St., Oakland 7. 

ALAMEDA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse, 12th and Fallon, Oak- 
land 7. 

ALAMEDA CO. MEDICAL LI- 
BRARY. Highland Hospital, 2701 14th 
Ave., Oakland 8. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON JR. 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2101 35th 

Ave. Mrs. Ceciie Christian, Libn. 

State : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund: $2,277 

Total vols : 11,101 ; New : 653 

Subs : Mags : 40 

Fac : 58 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 7-9 

BISHOP O'DOWD HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 9500 Stearns Ave. Sr. 
Mary Virginia, O.P., Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 9,280 
Total vols : 6,394 ; New : 455 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 42 ; Stud : 996 ; Grades : 9-12 

BRET HARTE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2874 Florida St. Mrs. Ruth 
Phillips, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,121 

Total vols : 8,597 ; New : 611 ' 

Subs : Mags : 23 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 1,026 ; Grades : 7-9 

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND CRAFTS LIBRARY. Broadway 
and College. Helen M. Kain, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 



CALIFORNIA CONCORDIA COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 6325 Camden St. 
Prof. John G. Mager, Libn. 
See junior college libraries table. 

CASTLEMONT SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 8601 MacArthur Blvd. 
Mrs. Florence Gardiner, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 14 clerks 

Book fund : $3,010 

Total vols : 12,904 ; New : 1,019 

Subs : Mags : 68 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 107 ; Stud : 2,237 ; Grades : 10-12 

CHABOT OBSERVATORY LI- 

BRARY. 4917 Mountain Blvd., Oak- 
land 2. 

CLAREMONT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 5750 College Ave. Mrs. 
Grace Gregory, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,312 

Total vols : 7,391 ; New : 352 

Subs : Mags : 19 

Fac : 28 ; Stud : 613 ; Grades : 7-9 

COLLEGE OF THE HOLY NAMES 
LIBRARY. 3500 Mountain Blvd. Sis- 
ter Mary Ermengarde, Libn. 
Branches or Departmental Libraries : 
(4) Curriculum Library, Juniorate 
Library, Novitiate Library, Los 
Gatos, and Provincial Dept., Los 
Gatos 
See state and other four-pear colleges 
table. 

DORR -OLIVER, INC. LIBRARY. 
2900 Glascock St., Oakland 1. 

ELMHURST JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1800 98th Ave. Mrs. Muriel 
Boardman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,643 

Total vols : 7,664 ; New : 758 

Subs : Mags : 37 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 40 ; Stud : 794 ; Grades : 7-9 

FIBREBOARD PAPER PRODUCTS 
CORP., RESEARCH & DEVELOP- 
MENT DEPT., BLDG. MATERIALS 
GROUP. Box 4331. Mrs. Ferna H. 
Parkans, Libn. Tel: OL 2-8400, ext. 
319. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : Originally established as ref- 
erence library for Research Dept. 
Total vols : 700 ; VF drawers : 1 
Subs : Mags : 18 
Special collections : Building materials, 

patents 
Expenditures : $85 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 



166 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



OAKLAND-Continued 

FITZGERALD, ABBOTT & BEARDS- 
LEY LAW LIBRARY. 1730 First 
Western BIdg., Oakland 12. Eleanor 
Dall, Libn. 

Total vols : 12,000 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 30 

Not open to public, except local attor- 
neys 

FRICK JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6250 Foothill Blvd. Mrs. 
Helen C. Stengel, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,098 
Total vols : 8,084 ; New : 672 
Subs : Mags : 40 
Fac : 50 ; Stud : 1,050 ; Grades : 7-9 

GOLDEN GATE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 6200 San Pablo Ave. Mrs. 

Yvette B. Schmitt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $913 

Total vols : 8,015 ; New : 273 

Subs : Mags : 20 

Fac : 17 ; Stud : 333 ; Grades : 7-9 

HAVENSCOURT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1390 66th Ave. Hazel Cox, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; f clerk 

Book fund : $1,519 

Total vols : 5,841 ; New : 512 

Subs : Mags : 32 

Fac : 45 ; Stud : 958 ; Grades : 7-9 

HERBERT HOOVER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3263 West St. 
Rose Pastorino, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,232 

Total vols : 4,380 ; New : 365 

Subs : Mags : 26 

Fac : 32 ; Stud : 634 ; Grades : 7-9 

HOLY NAMES HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4460 Harbord Dr. Mrs. Ve- 
ronica Colapietro, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $1,400 ; Circ : 7,844 
Total vols : 6,568 ; New : 225 
Subs : Mags : 95 ; Newsp : 7 
Fac : 30 ; Stud : 503 ; Grades : 9-12 

JOHN C. FREMONT SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4610 Foothill 
Blvd. Mrs. Edith Towers, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1* clerks 

Book fund : $3,013 

Total vols : 14,477 ; New : 998 

Subs : Mags : 67 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 96 ; Stud : 2,044 ; Grades : 10-12 

KAISER FOUNDATION SCHOOL 
OF NURSING LIBRARY. 3451 Pied- 
mont Ave. Mrs. Meredyth C. Welsch- 
meyer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 2,638 

Total vols : 2,195 ; New : 367 



Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac: 21; Stud: 160; 3-year nursing 
course 

KAISER-OAKLAND FOUNDATION 

HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 

280 W. MacArthur Blvd., Oakland 11. 

Tel: OL 3-6121, ext. 340. Mrs. Irma 

Hickman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 Ubn 

Purpose : To provide medical reference 
material and assistance for the doc- 
tors, nurses, students, and other 
medical personnel of the Oakland 
Kaiser Foundation Hospital. 

Total vols : 4,300 

New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 219 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Cardiology, Ortho- 
pedics, and Surgery 

Expenditures : $4,000 ; Circ : 5,100 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

KING JR. HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
8251 Fontaine St. Mrs. Catherine Pen- 
dleton, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $2,070 
Total vols : 2,885 ; New : 434 
Subs : Mags : 32 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 34 ; Stud : 782 ; Grades : 7-9 

JAMES MADISON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 400 Capistrano 
Dr. Mrs. Ruth Treveiler, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,087 

Total vols : 2,504 ; Ncav : 904 

Subs : Mags : 28 

Fac : 31 ; Stud : 654 ; Grades : 7-9 

LOWELL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1332 Myrtle St. Mrs. Helen 
Burke, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,174 
Total vols : 5,249 ; New : 458 
Subs : Mags : 26 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 52 ; Stud : 1,089 ; Grades : 7-9 

McCHESNEY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 3748 13th Ave. Mrs. Eariel 

Day, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,059 

Total vols : 4,820 ; New : 326 

Subs : Mags : 28 

Fac : 33 ; Stud : 736 ; Grades : 7-8 

McCLYMONDS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2607 Myrtle St. Dorothy Co- 
min, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $1,874 
Total vols : 10.702 ; New : 802 
Subs : Mags : 69 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 65 ; Stud : 952 ; Grades : 10-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



167 



MILLS COLLEGE LIBRARY. Flora 

E. Reynolds, Libn. 

Departmental Library : Margaret Prall 

Music Library. 
See state and other four-year colleges 

tahle. 

MONTERA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5525 Ascot Dr. Mrs. Theano 
Johnson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $2,073 
Total vols : 2,917 ; New : 656 
Subs : Mags : 26 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 38 ; Stud : 851 ; Grades : 7-9 

OAKLAND CHAMBER OF COM- 
MERCE, CITY DIRECTORY LI- 
BRARY. 1320 Webster St., Oakland 
12. J. W. Cowart, Libn. 

Staff : 2 

Purpose : Reference information for 
members of chamber, staff and gen- 
eral public. 

Total vols : 215 

New Titles : 25 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : Directories must be 
used in Chamber Bldg. Telephone re- 
quests limited to reasonable number. 

OAKLAND CITY COLLEGE, Joseph 
C. Laney Trade and Technical Insti- 
tute Library. 1003 Third Ave. Howard 
Shipman, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

OAKLAND CITY COLLEGE, Liberal 
Arts and Merritt Business Library. 
5714 Grove St. Irwin Mayers, Libn. 

^ee Junior College Libraries table. 

OAKLAND HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3233 Park Blvd. Mrs. Helen 
Cyr, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,785 

Total vols : 17,444 ; New : 1,136 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 140 ; Stud : 2,973 ; Grades : 9-12 

OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 125 
14th St., Oakland 12. Peter T. Conmy, 
Libn. 

Branches : 22 
Stations : 21 

OAKLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS & 
TEACHERS PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. 1025 Second Ave. Jessie E. 
Boyd, Dir. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

OAKLAND TECHNICAL HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4351 Broadway. 
Mrs. Maurine Hardin, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; li clerks 

Book fund : $2,892 

Total vols : 23,420 ; New : 1,545 

Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 96 ; Stud : 1,843 ; Grades : 10-12 



OAKLAND TRIBUNE LIBRARY. 

13th and Franklin, Oakland 4. Tel: 

TE 2-6000. Arthur A. Hake!, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns : 2 others 

Purpose : Clipping reference and picture 
supply for Editorial Department of 
this newspaper ; strictly limited serv- 
ice to all others. 

Total vols : 3,500 ; Pams : 650 

VF drawers : 1,155 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries (reference only) 

Interlibrary loan : by special arrange- 
ment with publisher. 

PHILATELIC RESEARCH SOCIETY 
LIBRARY. 3822 Harrison St. 



ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH 
LIBRARY. 1926 19th Ave. 
Todd, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 4 clerk 

Book fund : $1,679 

Total vols : 4,716 ; New : 210 

Subs : Mags : 23 

Fac : 39 ; Stud : 811 ; Grades 



SCHOOL 

Mrs. Etta 



7-9 



SAFEWAY STORES, INC. LIBRARY. 
DEPT. 4th and Jackson Sts., Oak- 
land 4. 

ST. ALBERTS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
6172 Chabot Rd., Oakland 11. 

ST. ELIZABETH'S HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1530 34th Ave., Oakland 1. 

SKYLINE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

12250 Skyh'ne Blvd. Mrs. Erma D. 

Robison, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund: $18,000, capital outlay. 

New : 3,4.50 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 69 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades : 10-12 

TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4351 Broadway, Oakland 11. 

TENNYSON HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 20935 Whitman. Katharine 
M. Long, Libn. 

U.S. ARMY, OAKLAND ARMY TER- 
MINAL POST LIBRARY. Oakland 14. 
Tel: TW 3-4100, Ext. 4190. Mrs. Neiie 
Holshouser, Libn. 

U.S. NAVAL HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 
8750 Mountain Blvd., Oakland 14. 



14. 



MEDICAL LIBRARY. Oakland 



U.S. NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER LI- 
BRARY. Bldg. 321-1 Naval Supply 
Center, Oakland 14. Robert De Baun, 
Libn. 



168 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



OAKLAND— Continued 

U.S. NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER. IN- 
DUSTRIAL RELATIONS DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. Code 44E, IRD, BIdg. 321-1, 
Oakland 14. Tel: TW 3-4224, ext. 
8424. Mrs. Colleen Gracia, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : To assist management in solv- 
ing operational problems of the Cen- 
ter by acquiring and disseminating 
appropriate information and to assist 
the employee to achieve his best per- 
formance in his present job. 
Total vols : 1,000 ; Pams : 2,000 
New Titles : 60 
Subs : Mags : 31 
Special collections : Special emphasis on 

industrial management. 
Expenditures : $1,025 
Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 13th and Har- 
rison Sts., Oakland 12. Tel: GL 1-7010. 

WESTLAKE JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2629 Harrison St. Mrs. Ann 
Timmins, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $i;220 

Total vols : 7,464 ; New : 403 

Subs : Mags : 19 

Fac : 35 ; Stud : 729 ; Grades : 7-9 

WOODROW WILSON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 451 48th St. Mrs. 
Mary Cottom, Libn. 

Stair : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,230 

Total vols : 6,121 ; New : 324 

Subs : Mags : 23 

Fac : 29 ; Stud : 634 ; Grades : 7-9 

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH AND 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5201 Park Blvd. 

Mrs. Alma Tracey, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $140.34 ; Circ : 2,806 

Total vols : 2,230 ; New 209 

Subs : Mags : 2 

Fac : 3 ; Stud : 90 ; Grades : 1-9 



OCEANSIDE (San Diego Co.) 

JEFFERSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 823 Acacia St. Linda Mc- 
Leod, Lib«. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $3,000 

Total vols : 5,085 ; New : 1,035 

Subs : Mags : 28 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 40 ; Stud : 940 ; Grades : 7-9 

OCEANSIDE-CARLSBAD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1100 1st St. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Rexford, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 



OCEANSIDE-CARLSBAD HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1100 1st St. 
Elizabeth M. Rexford, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,000 
Total vols : 16,650 ; New : 864 
Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac : 18 ; Stud : 500 and 1,900 extended 
day ; Grades : 9-14 

OCEANSIDE HIGH SCHOOL AND 
JR. COLLEGE DISTRICT LIBRARY. 
1100 1st St. Mrs. Elizabeth Rexford, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,200 ; Circ : 14,121 
Total vols : 16,222 ; New : 651 
Subs : Mags : 132 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac: 77; Stud: 1,609, extended day 
4,800 ; Grades : 9-14 

OCEANSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 321 
N. Nevada. Mary C. Love, Libn. 

OCEANSIDE UNION SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT. 2111 Mission. Mrs. Frances 
Russell, Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 



OJAI (Ventuvci Co.) 

MATILIJA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Rt. 3, Maricopa Rd. Carolyn 
M. Mallory, Libn. 
Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 14,402 
Total vols : 2,455 ; New : 660 
Subs : Mags : 19 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 27 ; Stud : 650 ; Grades : 7-9 

NORDHOFF HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 701 El Paseo. 
Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 7,000 
Total vols : 3,400 ; New : 300 
Subs : Mags : 29 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 26 ; Stud : 430 ; Grades : 10-12 

THE THACHER SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Gui Ignon, Libn. 

Book fund : $1,200 ; Circ : 2,400 
Total vols : 10,175 ; New : 124 
Subs : Mags : 42 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 23 ; Stud : 118 ; Grades : 9-12 

VILLANOVA PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 12096 Ventura 
Ave. Mrs. Edna F. Hunt, Libn. 

Book fund : $790 ; Circ : 1,756 
Total vols : 5,486 ; New : 358 
Subs : Mags : 38 

Fac: 10; Stud: 60; 90 extended day; 
Grades : 9-12 

ONTA^iO (Son Bernardino Co.) 

CHAFFEY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5th and Euclid. Adaline Ny- 
berg, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 3 clerks 
Book fund : $4,600 ; Circ : 50,410 
Total vols : 24,547 ; New : 1,427 
Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 135 ; Stud : 2,650 ; Grades 9-12 






VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



169 



ONTARIO CITY LIBRARY. 215 East 
C St. James R. Housel, Libn. 

SUNKIST GROWERS, INC., RE- 
SEARCH DEPT. LIBRARY. 616 E. 

Grove St. 

VINA F. DANKS JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 318 W. J St. Esther Van 
Dyke, Libn. 



Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 15,000 
Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 1,000 
Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 55 ; Stud : 1,150 ; Grades 9-12 

ORiNDA UNION SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARIES, c/o Glorietta 
School, 15 Martha Rd. Mrs. Alice 
Frederick, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



ORANGE (Orange Co.) 

CHAPMAN COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

333 N. Glassell St. Marjorie Reeves, 
Libn. 

See State and other four-year colleges 
table. 

McPHERSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. North Prospect Avenue. 

ORANGE COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 12392 Piacentia Ave. Mrs. 
Margaret Morrison, Libn. 
Serves : Entire county except Anaheim, 
Buena Park, Fullerton, Huntington 
Beach, Newport Beach, Orange, Pia- 
centia, Santa Ana, Yorba Linda 
Outlets : 62 
Branches : Costa Mesa, Garden Grove, 

La Habra 
Stations : Barber City, Brea, Cypress, 
Dana Point, El Modena, Lacy Se- 
curity Facility, Laguna Beach, Los 
Alamitos, Midway City, Olive, San 
Clemente, San .Juan Capistrano, Seal 
Beach, Silverado, South Laguna, 
Stanton, Trabuco, Tustin, Villa Park, 
Westminster 
Bookmobile stops : 7 
Schools: 31 

ORANGE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
525 N. Shaffer St. Mrs. Mildred Field, 
Libn. 

Staff : 2 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 12,141 ; New : 580 

Subs : Mags : 98 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,439 ; Grades 10-12 

ORANGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 101 N. 
Center St. Mrs. Ethel H. Swanger, 
Libn. 

PORTOLA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1435 West Maple St. Mrs. 
Alva Cox, Libn. 

YORBA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 935 N. Cambridge. Mrs. Ro- 
sina McKenzie, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Grades : 7-9 



ORSMDA (Contra Casta Co.) 

MIRAMONTE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 750 Moraga Highway. Grace 
Gloruigen, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 



OSLAND (Glenn Co.) 

ORLAND FREE LIBRARY. 912 Third 
St. Margaret L. Kwate, Libn. 
AiBliated with : Glenn Co. F. L. 

ORLAND JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 201 Mill St. 



OROSS (Tuiat-e Co.) 

OROSI HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Palm Ave. 



OROVILLE (Butte Co.) 

BUTTE COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 

1566 Huntoon St. Ursula Meyer, Libn. 

Serves : County except Oroville and 
Chico 

Affiliated with : Biggs and Gridley 

Outlets : 74 

Stations : Bangor, Brush Creek, Chico, 
Clipper Mills, Cresta, De Sabla, Dur- 
ham, Feather Falls, Forbestown, 
Forest Ranch, Las Plumas, Magalia, 
Palermo, Paradise, Pulga, Richvale, 
Stirling City, West Liberty. 

Bookmobile stops : 23 

Schools: 30 

BUTTE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. J. H. Pank, Libn. 

Staff : 1 ; Income : $4,925 
Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 255 
Subs : Mags : 20 
Open to public 

BUTTE CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 

Thomas E. Evans, Co. Supt. Included 
in Co. F.L. 

OROVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1677 
Montgomery St. Mrs. Helen Boone, 
Libn. 

OROVILLE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1535 Bridge St. 



OXNARD (Ventura Co.) 

HUENEME HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 500 Bard Rd. Ellen M. Saito, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $10,000 ; Circ : 40 per day 

Total vols : 3.621 ; New 2,493 

Subs : Mags : 81 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 99 ; Stud : 1,960 ; Grades : 9-12 



170 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



OXNARD— Continued 

OXNARD ELEM. DISTRICT, IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CEN- 
TER. 255 Palm Dr. Mrs. Margaret 
Womack, Libn. 

See centralized schools libraries table. 

OXNARD HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
937 W. Fifth. Edward Wiseblood, 
Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 30,856 

Total vols : 10,500 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 84 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 82 ; Stud : 1,600 ; Grades : 9-12 

OXNARD PUBLIC LIBRARY. 424 S. 
C St. Emiiie Ritchen, Libn. 

Bookmobile stops : 10 school 



PACSFSG BEACH (San Diego Co.) 

Pacific Beach Jr. High School Library, 
see San Diego. 



PACtFIC GROVE (Monterey Co.) 

HOPKINS MARINE STATION LI- 
BRARY. Note: Supported by Stan- 
ford University, and statistics in- 
cluded with those of the University 
Libraries. 

PACIFIC GROVE HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Forest Avenue. Frances E. 
Whitehead, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Oirc : 8,357 

Total vols : 4,200 ; New : 206 

Subs : Mags : 58 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 38 ; Stud : 840 ; Grades : 9-12 

PACIFIC GROVE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. Central & Fountain. Mrs. 
Josephine G. Van Deren, Libn. 



PACOIMA (Los Angeles Co.) 



SCHOOL Ll- 

Canyon . Mrs. 



PACOIMA JR. HIGH 

BRARY. 9919 Laurel 

Inez Winton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $5,126.99 ; Circ : 22,505 

Total vols : 5,915 ; New : 1,029 

Subs : Mags : 148 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 87 ; Stud : 2,084 ; Grades : 7-9 



PALM CITY (San Diego Co.) 

MAR VISTA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 505 Elm Ave. 



PALM DESERT (Riverside Co.) 

COLLEGE OF THE DESERT LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 726, College to be 
opened in September 1962. 



PALM SPRINGS (Riverside Co.) 

PALM SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2248 E. Ramon Rd. 

WELWOOD MURRAY MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY. 100 So. Palm Canyon. 
Billie Lu Floan, Libn. (public library) 
Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 
Branches : 1 



PALMDALE (Los Angeles Co.) 

PALMDALE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2137 East Ave. R. Alice Bel- 
ton, Libn. 



PALO ALTO (Santa Clara Co.) 

CASTILLEJA SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1310 Bryant St. Mary K. Conroy, 
Libn, 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,144.54 ; Circ : 3,726 
Total vols : 8,970 ; New : 453 
Subs : Mags : 24 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 30 ; Stud : 173 ; 63 extended day ; 
Grades : 5-12 

CUBBERLEY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4000 Middlefield Road. Irene 
M. Seward, Libn. 
Staff 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,600 ; Circ : 35,000 
Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 1,122 
Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 74 ; Stud : 1,350 

GENERAL ELECTRIC TRAVELING 
WAVE TUBE SECTION, TECHNI- 
CAL LIBRARY. 601 California Ave. 
Verna Van Velzer, Libn. Tel: DA 
4-1661, ext. 202. 
Staff :1 libn 

Purpose : Provide bibliographic and li- 
brary service in the field of micro- 
wave electronics and physics in sup- 
port of research at G.E. TWT Prod- 
uct Section 
Total vols : 1,200 ; Pams : 2,300 
New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 55 
Subs : Mags : 140 ; Newsp : 2 
Special collections: The entire collec- 
tion is in the fields of electronics, phy- 
sics, and related topics 
Expenditures : $4,000 ; Circ : 2,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on request 
Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying 

HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY 
LIBRARY. 1501 Page Mill Rd. Tel: 
DA 6-7000, ext. 2670. Joan Hum- 
phreys, Libn. 

Purpose: Company technical library 
Total vols : 4,000 

New titles : 300-500 ; VF drawers : 28 
Subs : Mags : 400 ; Newsp : 10 



VOLUME i^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



171 



Special collections : Electrical and elec- 
tronic engineering, mathematics, phys- 
ics, and chemistry 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on request 
Services: Literature searching; biblio- 
graphies ; photostat copying 

JORDAN JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. California and Middlefield. 
Mrs. Elizabeth N. Millar, Libn. 

LOCKHEED MISSILES & SPACE 
CO., TECHNICAL INFORMATION 
CENTER. 3251 Hanover St. William 
A. Kozumplik, Libn. Tel: DA 4-3311, 
ext. 45774. 

Staff : 25 libns ; 33 others 
Purpose : Support scientific, technolog- 
ical, and management efforts in space 

SCIGUCGS 

Total vols': 28,000 ; Pams : 102,000 

New titles : 10,000 

Subs : Mags : 900 ; Newsp : 20 

Special collections : Security classified 
and unclassified technical reports on 
space scientific subjects 

Expenditures : $175,000 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : restrictd 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing & abstracting 

PALO ALTO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
1213 Newell Rd. L. Kenneth Wilson, 
Libn. 
Branches : 4 

PALO ALTO SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 50 Embarcadero Rd. Mrs. 
Emma Ruth Christine, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,700 

Total vols : 13,000 ; New : 700 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 103 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades 10-12 

PALO ALTO UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT, INSTRUCTIONAL MA- 
TERIALS CENTER. 25 Churchill 
Ave. Robert Brown, Libn. 

I See centralized school libraries table. 

PHILCO WESTERN DEVELOP- 
MENT LABORATORIES LIBRARY. 
3875 Fabian Way. Mrs. Beatrice Gib- 
son, Libn. 

I Staff : 2 libns ; 3 other 
Purpose : To furnish scientific material 
to engineers and scientific personnel 

I Total vols: 2,500; Pams: 100 

j Technical documents : 7,000 

S Subs : Mags : 168 

! Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

i Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



RAVENSHOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2050 Cooley Ave., East Palo 
Alto. Evelyn P. Bennett, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $10,000 

Total vols : 9,400 ; New : 2,800 

Subs : Mags : 116 ; Newsp : 3 

Grades : 9-12 

TEACHERS PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. Board of Education BIdg., 
543 Channing Ave., Box 450. 

VARIAN ASSOCIATES LIBRARY. 
610 Hansen Way. Mrs. Lois Olson, 
Libn. 

TERMAN JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 655 Arastradero Rd. Mamie 
Slagle, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 4,326 ; New : 683 

Subs : Mags : 34 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 46 ; Stud : 820 ; Grades : 7-9 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 3201 Junipero 
Serra. Tel: DA 6-5600, ext. 510. Jack 
M. Miller, Libn. 

Staff : 8.3 

Purpose : Medical Library provides med- 
ical reference, bibliographies, and in- 
terlibrary loan services for a psychi- 
atric and medical residency training 
program. General library promotes 
bibliotherapy and provides education 
and recreational reading for patients, 
staff and volunteers 

Total vols : 13,129 

New titles : 2383 

Subs : Mags : 60 

Special collections : Neurology, psychi- 
atry, clinical psychology, biochem- 
istry, psychiatric social work, ethnol- 
ogy, occupational therapy, psychiatric 
nursing and recreational therapy 

Circ : 13,175 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on request 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
graphies ; briefing & abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

WILBUR JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 480 East Meadow. Mrs. 
Maurine Johnson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 

Book fund : $2;.500 ; Circ : 20,304 

Total vols : 7,200 ; New : 635 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 58 ; Stud : 1,249 ; Grades : 7-9 

PALOS VERDES ESTATES 
(Los Angeles Co.) 

MARYMOUNT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

Mother M. Constance, Libn. 
See State and other four-year college 
table. 



m 



NEWS iSrOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



PALOS VETOES ESTATES-Contiriuest 

PALOS VERDES LIBRARY DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 2400 Via Catnpe- 
sina. David N. McKay, Libn. 
Outlets : 1 school 



PAI^ADISE (Butte C«3.) 

PARADISE JR. and SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Maxwell Dr. 
Mrs. Ursula W. Benner, Libn. 

State : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book funds : $3,300 

Total vols : 5,369 ; New : 850 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 37 ; Stud : 850 ; Grades : 7-12 



PARAMOUhET (Los Atigeles Co.) 

Paramount Jr. High School Library, 
see under Gompton. 

Paramount 8r. High School Library, 
see under Gompton. 

PARAMOUNT UNIFIED SCHOOLS. 
15324 California. Catherine S. Ott, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



PARLiER (Fresno Co.) 

PARLIER HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Dorothy M. Burrell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teaclier-libn 

Book fund : $395 ; Circ : 1,700 

Total vols : 1,200 ; New : 75 

Subs : Mag-s : 31 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 15 ; Stud : 167 ; Grades : 9-12 



PASADENA (Los Angeies Co.} 

BURROUGHS CORP., ELECTRO- 
DATA MANUFACTURING AND 
ENGINEERING DIV. LIBRARY. 460 
Sierra Madre Villa. Tel: EL 5-8061. 
Sophia P. White, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 3 others 
Purpose : To provide information serv- 
ice to technical staff. 
Total vols : 6,000 

New Titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 36 
Subs : Mags : 300 ; Newsp : 3 
Special collections : Digital computer 
sj^stems; Mathematics and Applied 
Programming 
Expenditures : $7,000 
Available to : Co. '^t^rf, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscriptions 



CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF 
TECHNOLOGY LIBRARY. 1201 E. 
California Blvd. Dr. Roger Stanton, 
Dir. 

Departmental Libraries: (11) Aero- 
nautics, Astrophysics, Biology, Chem- 
ical Engineering, Chemistry, General, 
Geology, Humanities, Industrial Rela- 
tions, Mathematics Research, Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

CHARLES W. ELIOT JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2134 N. Lake 
Ave. Altadena (Pasadena city schools). 
Mrs. Betty B. Werking, Libn. 

CONSOLIDATED ELECTRODY- 
NAMICS CORP. LIBRARY. 300 N. 
Sierra Madre Villa. 

D A YST RO M-WIANCKO ENGI- 
NEERING COMPANY LIBRARY. 255 
N. Halstead Ave. Mrs. Nancy M. Mo- 
ler, Libn. Tel: SY 3-9164, ext. 251. 
Staff : 1 

Purpose : Supply reference and research 
material to staif engineers and man- 
agement. 
Total vols : 1,000 ; Pams : 2,000 
New Titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 34 
Subs : Mags : 110 ; Newsp : 2 
Special collections : Engineering : mainly 

electrical, transducers 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

FLINTRIDGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL FOR BOYS LIBRARY. 301 
Foothill, La Canada. 

FLINTRIDGE SACRED HEART 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 440 St. 
Katherine Dr., Pasadena 15. 

FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMI- 
NARY LIBRARY. 135 N. Oakland. 
Clara B. Allen, Libn. 

See state and other jour-year colleges 
table. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1505 N. Marengo 
Ave., Pasadena 3. Harold C. Kime, 
Libn. 

HUNTINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPI- 
TAL, MEDICAL LIBRARY. 100 Con- 
gress St. Tel: SY 6-0381, ext. 405. 
Helen M. Kindy, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Provide reading and research 
facilities for the doctors, residents, 
and interns on the hospital staff. 

Total vols : 7,700 ; Pams : 1,000 

New Titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 9 

Subs : Mags : 250 

Special collections : Medicine 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



173 



Expenditures : $800 ; Circ : 4,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : literature searching ; bibliop;- 
raphies 

JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 

LIBRARY. 4800 Oak Grove Dr. Tel: 

SY 0-6811. Mrs. Margaret Barry, Libn. 

Staff : 9 libns 

Purpose : Service to JPL professional 
and technical staff 

Total vols : 20,000 ; Pams : 100,000 

New Titles : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 600 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Astronautics and 
geoastrophysics 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

JOHN MARSHALL JR. HJGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 990 N. Allen 
Ave., Pasadena 7. 

JOHN MUIR HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1905 Lincoln Ave. Mrs. Lura 
C. Nelson, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libn ; 3 clerks 

Book fund: $6,615.64; Circ: 300 per 

day 
Total vols : 20,000 ; New : 1,460 
Subs : Mags : 110 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 138 ; Stud : 2,897 ; Grades : 10-12 

LA CANADA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1100 Foothill Blvd., La 
Canada (Pasadena city schools). 

MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY 
LIBRARY. 813 Santa Barbara St., 
Pasadena 4. Mrs. Mary F. Coffeen, 
Libn. 

PASADENA BRANCH, LOS AN- 
GELES COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 
Mezzanine, Security BIdg., Pasadena 
2. 

PASADENA CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 1570 E. Colorado Blvd. Wil- 
liam K. Grainger, Libn. 

See junior college lihraries table. 

PASADENA CITY SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY SERVICES. 351 S. Hudson 
Ave. Lillian M. Watkins, Super. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

PASADENA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
1539 E. Howard. Mrs. Elizabeth A. 
Hall, Libn. 

PASADENA DEPT. OF PUBLIC 
HEALTH LIBRARY. 100 N. Garfield. 
Tel: SY 2-6161, ext. 284. Mrs. Micha- 
line Kotek, Libn, 

Staff : 1 libn 



Purpose : The library is primarily for 
our staff, since materials are mostly 
of a technical nature. It is used, how- 
ever, to some degree by students pre- 
paring paper. 

Total vols : 200 ; Pams : 500 

New titles : 20 ; VF drawers : 4 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 2 

Expenditures : $275 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

PASADENA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2925 E. Sierra Madre Blvd. 
Mrs. Helen R. Sebby, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 3 clerks 

Book fund: $10,000; Circ: 15,732 

Total vols : 8,925 

Subs : Mags : 147 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 160 ; Stud : 3,580 ; Grades : 10-12 

PASADENA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 285 
E. Walnut St. Marjorie Donaldson, 
Libn. 

Branches : 8 

PASADENA STAR— NEWS LI- 
BRARY. 525 E. Colorado St. 

RALPH W. PARSONS COMPANY, 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
LIBRARY. 135 W. Dayton St. 

ST. ANDREWS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 42 Chestnut. Sr. Francis de 
Chantal, Libn. 
Staff : 2 teacher-Kbns 
Book fund : $664.50 ; Circ : 3.735 
Total vols : 6,287 ; New : 379 
Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 19 ; Stud : 405 ; Grades : 9-12 

ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 200 Michigan, La Canada. 

SARAH CECILIA KRAKOWSKI 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 1434 N. 
Foothill Blvd., Jewish Community 
Center. 

THE STUART COMPANY LI- 
BRARY. 3360 E. Foothill Blvd. Tel: 
SY 5-7251. Mrs. Gertrude M. Clark, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Purpose : To serve all departments of 
pharmag/eutical manufacturer with em- 
phasis on research and development 
functions. 

Total vols : 500 ; Pams : 6,000 

New titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 20 

Subs : Mags : 250 

Expenditures : $5,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loasr:,^!! libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscrip- 
tions 



174 



NEWS NOTES OP CALEFOBNIA LIBEARIES 



PASADENA— Continued 

U.S. NAVAL ORDNANCE TEST 
STATION, PASADENA ANNEX, 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. 3202 Foot- 
hill Blvd. Tel: SY 3-0621, ext. 264. 

WESTERN PERSONNEL INSTI- 
TUTE, JOSEPH G. PROSSER LI- 
BRARY. 1136 Steuben St. Algene 
Parsons, Libn. Tel: SY 5-7203. 

Stafe : 1 libn 

Special collections : College student 
personnel administration, educational 
and vocational counseling 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

WESTRIDGE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
LIBRARY. 324 Madeline Drive. Mrs. 
Maygene Giari, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,170.62 ; Circ : 3,103 

Total vols : 3,344 ; New : 218 

Subs : Mags : 37 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 23 ; Stud : 162 ; Grades 9-12 

WILLIAM McKINLEY JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 325 S. Oak 
Knoll. 

WOODROW WILSON Jr. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 300 South Ma- 
dre. S. Helen Damron, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book funds : $2,766 

Total vols : 6,820 ; New : 620 

Subs : Mags : 97 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 43 ; Stud : 870 ; Grades : 7-9 



Special collections : Psychiatry ( in- 
cludes psychology, mental health), 
Psychiatric nursing, Alcoholism, Geri- 
atrics, Neurology 

Expenditures : $2,500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions. 

PATTON STATE HOSPITAL, PA- 
TIENTS LIBRARY. Drawer B, Box 
209 Alva S. Klotter, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 10,000 

New titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 11 

Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 6 

Expenditures : $1,100 

PERRIS (Riverside Co.) 

PERRIS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 503 D 
St. Mrs. Nina Nelander, Libn. 
Aflaiiated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 

PERRIS UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Highway 395. 



PESCADERO (San Msateo Co.) 

PESCADERO UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box 206. Franz 
T. von Klooster, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,100 

Total vols : 475 ; New : 475 

Subs : Mags : 11 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 8 ; Stud : 94 ; Grades : 9-12 



PASO ROBLES (Sen Luis Obispo Co.) 

PASO ROBLES HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 24th and Spring Sts. 

PASO ROBLES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Twelfth and Park Sts., P.O. Box 697. 
Mrs. Gertrude Chesmore, Libn. 



PATTERSON (Stanislaus Co.) 

PATTERSON UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 547. 



PATTON (San Bernardino Co.) 

PATTON STATE HOSPITAL, MED- 
ICAL LIBRARY. Drawer B, Box 209. 
Tel: GL 8-8121. Alva S. Klotter, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 3,700 

New titles : 150 ; VF drawers : 5 

Subs : Mags : 116 



PETALUMA (Sonoma Co.) 

PETALUMA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Webster St. Mrs. Mar- 
garet Ono, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $750 ; Circ : 5,060 
Total vols : 1,300 ; New : 131 
Subs : Mags : 13 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 18 ; Stud : 580 ; Grades : 7-9 

PETALUMA FREE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 4th and B Sts., P.O. Box 
300. Edna Bovett, Libn. 

Stations : 1 school 

PETALUMA SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Fair St. Gwyneth Wilde, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,400 ; Circ : 9,500 

Total vols : 4.000 

Subs : Mags : 13 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 43 ; Stud : 1,100 ; Grades : 10-12 

U. S. ARMY. TWO ROCK RANCH 
POST LIBRARY. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



175 



PICO RIVEEtA (Los Angeles Co.) 

EL RANCHO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6501 S. Passons. Laverne 
Baker, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,992.85 ; Circ : 28,877 

Total vols : 9,642 ; New : 1,168 

Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 116 ; Stud : 2,671 ; Grades : 9-12 



PEEDMONT (Alameda Co.) 

PIEDMONT ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS LIBRARY. Yvonne Poi- 
rier, Supv. of Elem. Libs. 

PiPDMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 800 Magnolia Ave., Pied- 
mont 11. 



PLACERVILLE (El Dorado Co.) 

EL DORADO COUNTY LIBRARY. 
2S Sacramento St. Mrs. Vera E. Fitch, 
Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 
Outlets : 32 

Branches : Lake Valley- 
Stations : Camino, Georgetown, Pollock 

Pines, Shingle Springs 
Schools : 26 

EL DORADO CO, HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 222 Canal St. 

EL DORADO CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

EL DORADO CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 32. Blaine Wishart, 
Co. Supt. Included in Co. F.L. 



PITTSBURG (Contra Costa Co.) 

CENTRAL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 351 School Street. Cecelia 
Myrland, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $3.50 per pupil ; Circ : 

16,000 
Total vols : 11.000 ; New : 920 
Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 46 ; Grades : 7-9 

THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY 

LIBRARY. Marian Wickline, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 3 others 

Total vols : 11,-500 

Subs : Mags : 300 

Special collections : Chemistry 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 

HILLVIEW JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 33 Yosemite Dr., Nancy 
Menken, Libn. 

PACIFICA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 205 Pacific Ave., June Win- 
ters, Libn. 

PITTSBURG SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
' SBRARY. 250 School St. Edwin L. 
Tyson, Libn. 

PITTSBURG UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 2000 Railroad Ave. Mrs. 
Fern Davis, Libn. 

See centralized school liiraries taile. 



PLACENTIA (Orange Co.) 

I PLACENTIA DISTRICT LIBRARY. 

i 143 S. Bradford. Mae P. Bariass, Libn. 

VALENCIA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Bradford Ave, 



PLEASANT HILL (Contra Costa Co.) 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY FREE 
LIBRARY. 1750 Oak Park Blvd. Mrs. 
Bertha D. Helium, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Rich- 
mond. 

Outlets : 66 

Branches : Antioch, Brentwood. Con- 
cord, Crockett, El Cerrito, El So- 
brante, Kensington, Lafayette, Mar- 
tinez, Orinda, Pinole, Pittsburg, 
Pleasant Hill, Rodeo, San Pablo, 
San Ramon Valley-Danville, "Walnut 
Creek. 

Stations : Alamo, Bethel Island, Byron, 
County Hospital, Hercules, Knight- 
sen, Oakley, Pacheco, Port Chicago. 

Bookmobile stops : 39 

PLEASANT HILL HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3100 Oak Park Blvd. Eu- 
gene W. McClain, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,798 ; Circ : 14,450 
Total vols : 7,859 ; New : 114 
Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 83 ; Stud : 1,426 ; Grades : 9-12 



PLEASANTON (Alameda Co.) 

AMADOR VALLEY JT. UNION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. Santa 
Rita Road. Barbara J. Dittman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 Ubn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 7.227 

Total vols : 4,766 ; New : 854 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 26 ; Stud : 480 ; Grades : 9-12 

POINT ARENA (Mendocino Co.) 

POINT ARENA UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box 178. George 
Besore, Libn. 

POINT LOMA (San Diego Co.) 

Libraries in Point Loma listed under 
Ban Diego. 



176 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



POINT MUGU (Ventura Cs.) 

U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 41. Tel: HU 6-8331, 
ext. 7771. Frances J. Rugen, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Purpose : To provide educational, rec- 
reational and technical reading ; gen- 
eral reference ; reader's adviser serv- 
ice to the military personnel and 
their dependents stationed at Point 
Mugu. 

Total vols : 11,500 ; Pams : 200 

New titles : 1.000 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 6 

Special collections : Naval art and sci- 
ence, guided missiles, aeronautics, in- 
ternational relations 

Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : 16,572 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrarj^ loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 



POMONA (Los Angeles Co.) 

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECH- 
NIC COLLEGE, KELLOGG-VOOR- 
HIS CAMPUS LIBRARY. Harold F. 
Wells, Libn. 

See state and other fo%ir-year colleges 
taile. 

EMERSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 635 Lincoln Ave. Elsie M. 
Fossum, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 14,641 
Total vols : 7,792 ; New : 680 
Subs : Mags : 77 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : .52 ; Stud : 1,280 ; Grades : 7-9 

FREMONT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 800 South Garey. Mrs. Grace 
Eisea, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 200,000 
Total vols : 6.000 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 29 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 47 ; Stud : 1,103 ; Grades : 7-9 

JOHN MARSHALL JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1921 Arroyo. 

Geneva Crone, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,8-36 ; $769 N.D.E.A. ; 

Circ: 9,692 
Total vols : 3,500 ; New : 700 
Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 42 ; Stud : 1,070 ; Grades 7-9 

PACIFIC STATE HOSPITAL, Pa- 
tients' Library. Box 100. J. Richard 
Rivers, Libn. 

Staff : .5 libn 

Purpose : Recreation and bibliotherapy 

for the patients 
Total vols : 3,500 ; Pams : 400 
New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 5 
Subs : Mags : 23 ; Newsp : 2 
Expenditures : $500 ; Circ : 455 
Services : Film library ; recordings 

(tape or disc). 



PACIFIC STATE HOSPITAL STAFF 

LIBRARY. P.O. Box 100. Tel: LY 5- 

1221, ext. 277. Mrs. Eleanor E. Wash, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1.5 libn ; 1 patient 

Purpose : To supply medical and other 
information to staff members and to 
assist in hospital research and train- 
ing programs. 

Total vols : 4,788 ; Pams : 5,000 

New titles : 588 ; VF drawers : 16 

Subs : Mags : 200 

Special collections : Mental retardation, 
psychiatry, medicine, psychology and 
allied fields 

Expenditures : $5,170 ; Circ : 7,366 

Available to : Co staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : To all libraries on 
request 

Services : Bibliographies 

POMONA BRANCH, LOS ANGELES 
COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. County 
Courts Building, 350 W. Fifth Ave. 

POMONA CATHOLIC HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 533 W. Holt 
Ave. Sr. Mary Malvina, Libn. 
Staff: 1 libn; 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund: $1,312.-50; Circ: 4,036 
Total vols : 5,341 ; New : 277 
Subs : Mags : 42 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 18 ; Stud : 525 ; Grades : 9-12 

POMONA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
650 E. Holt. Una S. Moran, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 

Book fund : $-51000 ; Circ : 13,011 

Total vols : 5,400 ; New : 1,539 

Subs : Mags : 99 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 1,117 ; Grades : 10-12 

POMONA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 380 N. 
Main St. Raymond M. Holt, Libn. 

Branches : 1 
Stations : 2 

POMONA UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT, CURRICULUM CENTER 
LIBRARY. 700 N. Gibbs St. Elizabeth 
Reining, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table. 



PORTERVILLE (Tulare Co.) 

PORTERVILLE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 1525 S. Main St. Mrs. Emmy 
L. Ritz, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

PORTERVILLE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS CENTRAL LIBRARY. 706 
N. Kessing. Donald E. Seager, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

PORTERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
200 E. Thurman St. Mrs. Dorothy D. 
Margo, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Tulare Co. F. L. 



Volume 'yj, no. i, winter, 1962 



177 



PORTERVILLE STATE HOSPITAL, 

MEDICAL LIBRARY. Box 2000. Tel: 

SU 4-2000. Mrs. Mary Jane Berry, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Reference and educational 
needs of staff 

Total vols : 1,775 ; Pams : 200 

New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 110 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Medicine, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology 

Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : 2,143 

Available to : Co. staff 

Services : Literature searching ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

PORTERVILLE STATE HOSPITAL, 

PATIENTS LIBRARY. Box 2000. 

Mrs. Mary Jane Berry, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Recreation and education for 

patients 
Total vols : 2,000 
New titles : 200 
Subs : Mags : 2 
Expenditures : $500 
Available to : Patients 

PORTERVILLE UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 735 W. Olive. 

Mrs. Bianciie C. Waters, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 11,791 ; New : 705 

Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 98 ; Stud : 2,100 ; Grades : 9-12 



PORT HUENEME (Ventura Co.) 

Hueneme High School Lilrary, see un- 
der Oxnard. 

U.S. NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING 
LABORATORY LIBRARY. Tel: HU 
6-1651, ext. 252. Mrs. Hope S. Smith, 
Libn. 

U.S. NAVAL CONSTRUCTION 
BATTALION CENTER LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Audrey Hanes, Libn. 



Pi?9NCETON (Coiusa Co.) 



CONSTRUCTION EQUIP- 
MENT DEPARTMENT LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Byrde Knudson, Libn. 

U.S. NAVAL SCHOOLS, CIVIL EN- 
GINEER CORPS OFFICERS, LI- 
BRARY. U.S.N. Construction Bat- 
talion Center. E. Frances Mason. 
Libn. 

PORTOLA (Plumsts Co.) 

PORTOLA JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. California St. Mrs. Lo- 

retta Johnson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $750 

Total vols : 3,500 ; New : 150 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 15 ; Stud : 275 ; Grades : 7-12 



PRINCETON JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Florence 
McCoy, Libn. 



POEMTE (Los AngeEes Co.) 

PUENTE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 313 Nelson St., P.O. Box 
1299 

QOGNCY (Plumas Co.) 

PLUMAS COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. M. Josephine 
Moore, Libn. 
Serves : Entire county. Sierra County 

by contract. 
Contracts with : Sierra County 
Outlets : 15 

Stations : Beckwourth, Belden, Caribou, 
Chester, Cbilcoot, Crescent Mills, 
Cromberg, Greenville, La Porte, Por- 
tola, Storrie, Taylorsville, Twain, 
Vinton. 

PLUMAS CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. 

PLUMAS CO. TEACHERS' PRO- 
FESSIONAL LIBRARY. 

PLUMAS UNIFIED SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 

QUINCY JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Box 697. Mrs. Grace Rich- 
ards, Libn. 
Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,100 ; Circ : 9,300 
Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 240 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 27 ; Stud : 425 ; Grades : 7-12 

SIERRA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Address: Plumas Co. Free Library, 
Quincy. M. Josephine Moore, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Contracts with : Plumas Co. F. L. for 

service 
Outlets : 6 
Stations : Alleghany, Downieville, Loy- 

alton. Pioneer Camp, Sierra City, 

Sierraville 



RAMONA (San Diego Co.) 

RAMONA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Ninth and G Sts., P.O. 
Box 347 



RAr^CHO CORDOVA (Sacramento Co.) 

MILLS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10439 Coloma Rd. Mrs. Mary 
Anne Weigel, Libn. 



RAYMOND (Madera Co.] 

RAYMOND GRANITE UNION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. Patricia 
Pimentel, Libn. 



178 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES 



RED BLUFF (Tehama Co.) 

HERBERT KRAFT FREE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 909 Jefferson St. Mrs. Ella 
Hendricks, Libn. 

RED BLUFF UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Franklin St. Alice S. Mc- 
Clure, Libn. 

TEHAMA COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 726 Washington St. Mrs. 
Alice Mathisen, Libn. 
Serves : entire county except Red Bluff 
Affiliated with : Corning Public Library 
Outlets : 167 

Stations : Gerber, Flournoy, Inskip, 
Kirkwood, Los Molinos, Los Robles, 
Mineral, Olive, Pine Creek, Tehama, 
Vina. 
Bookmobile stops : 133 
Schools : 51 

TEHAMA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

TEHAMA CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. 



REDDING (Shasta Co.) 

ENTERPRISE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 71. 

SHASTA COLLEGE LIBRARY. Eu- 
reka Way. India A. Newton, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries iahle. 

SHASTA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
1527 Yuba St. Esther L. Mardon, Libn. 

Serves : entire county 

Outlets : 20 

Stations : Anderson, Bella Vista, Bur- 
ney, Castella, Central Valley, Cotton- 
wood, Enterprise, Fall River Mills, 
French Gulch, Hat Creek, Lakehead, 
Millville, Montgomery Creek, Oak 
Run, Ono, Palo Cedro, Pit #5, Pla- 
tina. Redding, Whitmore 

SHASTA CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

SHASTA CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
Pine St. James Mullins, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SHASTA CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Lucy Hunt, Co. Supt. 

SHASTA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Eureka Way. Mrs. Evelyn Crouch, 
Libn. 



REDLANDS (San Bernardino Co.) 

A. K. SMILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
4th and Vine. Edith W. Taylor, Libn. 



EDWARD M. COPE JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1100 W. Cypress. 
Mrs. Helen Loge, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 63,500 

Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 40 ; Stud : 1,000 ; Grades : 7-9 

GRAND CENTRAL ROCKET CO., 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 
111. Belle D. Berlad, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 

Purpose : Provide needed literature of 
staff of GCR Co. in all departments, 
particularly scientific and technical 
personnel 

Total Vols : 2,000 ; Pams : 4,000 

New Titles : 150 ; VF drawers : 4 

Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Solid propellants, 
space technology, chemistry, engineer- 
ing 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

REDLANDS ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOLS CENTRAL LIBRARY.528 
Orange St. 

REDLANDS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. June M. Miley, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 15,473 

Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 800 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 41 ; Stud : 940 ; Grades : 7-9 

REDLANDS SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 653 E. Fern. 

UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS LI- 
BRARY. Esther M. Hiie, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



REDONDO BEACH (Los Angeles Co.) 

AVIATION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2025 Manhattan Beach Blvd. 
John E. Geyer, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $5,000 ; Circ : 25,000 
Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 1,000 
Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,-300 ; Grades : 9-12 

MIRA COSTA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 701 S. Peck. Rebecca C. 
Cowan, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book funds : $5,605 ; Circ : 18,345 
Total vols : 11,104 ; New : 1,004 
Subs : Mags : 114 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 90 ; Stud : 1,984 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



179 



REDONDO BEACH PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. City Park. 

Branches : 1 

REDONDO UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 631 Vincent Park. Fred- 
erick W. Siegel, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $6,000 

Total vols : 15,180 ; New : 1,174 

Subs : Mags : 123 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 90 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 9-12 

SOUTH BAY UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT CURRICULUM LI- 
BRARY. 222 N. Pacific Coast. Mrs. 
Sue Snido, Libn. 



REDWOOD CITY (San Mateo Co.) 

AMPEX CORPORATION TECHNI- 
CAL INFORMATION SERVICE LI- 
BRARY. 934 Charter St. Tel: EM 
9-7111, Ext. 220. Mark Baer, Dir. 

REDWOOD CITY PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 881 Jefferson. Karl Voll- 
mayer, Libn. 

Branches : 1 
Stations : 1 school 

REDWOOD CITY SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT. 400 Duane St. Mrs. Viola 
Hammer, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries taile. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. Hall of Justice and Records. 
W. H. Thorpe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 ; Income : $28,444.22 
Total vols : 11,210 ; New : 359 
Open to public 

SAN MATEO CO. SCHOOLS AND 
TEACHERS PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. Mrs. Beryl 
Erickson, Libn. 

SEQUOIA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Broadway and Brewster. F. 
Curtis May, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 31 clerks 
Book fund : $5,500 
Total vols : 20,000 ; New : 1,450 
Subs : Mags : 121 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 100 ; Stud : 1,975 ; Grades : 9-12 

WOODSIDE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Woodside Rd. and Churchill 
Ave. Mrs. Virginia Barrett, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $12,355 ; Circ : 16,327 

Total vols : 8,878 ; New : 3,000 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 75 ; Stud : 1,830 ; Grades : 9-12 



REEDLEY (Fresno Co.) 

REEDLEY COLLEGE LIBRARY. C. 
W. Abshire, Libn. 

See Junior College libraries table. 



REEDLEY JT. UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. North Avenue. 

Margaret Martens, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $550 ; Circ : 17,597 

Total vols : 7,795 ; New : 148 

Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 52 ; Stud : 928 ; Grades : 9-12 



REPRESA (Sacramento Co.) 

CALIFORNIA STATE PRISON, 

FOLSOM LIBRARY. P.O. Box W. 

David Kantor, Libn. 

Purpose : Provide complete library serv- 
ice for inmates and civilian personnel 

Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 8 

Expenditures : $5,000 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : No loans 

See also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 



RESEDA (Los Angeles Co.) 

CLEVELAND HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 8140 Van Alden. Catherine J. 
Hall, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 

Book fund : $2^593.81 ; Circ : 11,958 

Total vols : 4,315 ; New : 1,272 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 83 ; Stud : 1,926 ; Grades : 10-12 

RESEDA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
18230 Kittridge Ave. Tatiana P. Kea- 
tinge, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,200 ; Circ : 4,560 

Total vols : 7,500 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 80 ; Stud : 1,903 ; Grades : 10-12 

SEQUOIA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 18605 Erwin St, Berdine 
Petri, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,819 ; New : 1,533 
Subs : Mags : 95 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 82 ; Stud : 2,038 ; Grades : 7-9 

VALLEY BRANCH OF WIDNEY 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 821S Van- 
alden A>ve. Mrs. Palma E. Cass, Libn. 



RIA8.TO (San Bernardino Co.) 

Rialto Jr. High School Library, see 
San Bernardino. 



RICHMOMS (Contra Costa Co.) 

ADAMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Loring at Arlington. Eliza- 
beth Richardson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $5,932.24 ; Circ : 12,851 
Total vols : 5,315 ; New : 2.060 
Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 40 ; Stud : 1,021 ; Grades : 7-9 



180 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



RICKMGND-Continued 

CALIFORNIA RESEARCH CORPO- 
RATION LIBRARY. 576 Standard 
Ave. Tel: BE 2-1514, ext. 2105. Mrs. 
Nancy J. Haritatos, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 10 others 
Purpose : Information for researcli staff 
engaged in petroleum and petrochem- 
ical, process and product, research 
and development 
Total vols : 7,000 ; Pams : 5,000 
New Titles : 500 ; VF drawers : 120 
Subs : Mags : 780 ; Newsp : 4 
Expenditures : $25,000 ; Circ : 95,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions 

DE ANZA JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 5000 Valley View Rd. Olga 

M. Donegan, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 

Total vols : 9,348 ; New : 972 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 89 ; Stud : 1,907 ; Grades : 7-12 

EL CERRITO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Ashbury and Eureka Aves., 
El Cerrito 8 (Richmond city schools). 
Mrs. Marie Nelson, Libn. 

GRANADA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. State Ave. and S. 45th St. 
Eiouise Tolman, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,737 ; Circ : 5,144 
Total vols : 3,358 ; New : 496 
Subs : Mags : 28 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 31 ; Stud : 753 ; Grades : 7-9 

HARRY ELLS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 130 33d St. Dorothy H. Moist, 
Libn. 

HELMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2500 Road 20. San Pablo 
(Richmond City schools)). Mrs. Jua- 
nita Edmons, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : .S1.200 ; Circ : 13,772 
Total vols : 7,287 ; New : 512 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,350 ; Grades : 7-9 

LONGFELLOW JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY (AND STATION, RICH- 
MOND PUBLIC LIBRARY). 239 23d 
St. 

PORTOLA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1021 Navallier St., El Cerrito 
(Richmond city schools). 

RICHMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Civic Center Plaza. Coit Coolidge, 

Libn. 

Branches : 1 

Stations : 1 

Schools : 12 



RICHMOND UNION SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 23d St. and Tu- 
lare Ave., Richmond 10. 

ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY (AND STATION, RICH- 
MOND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9th St. 
and Bisseli Ave. 

SALESIAN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2851 North Ave. Rev. Mi- 
chael Ribotto, Libn. 

TRACERLAB, INC., LIBRARY. 2030 
Wright Ave. Trudy Henington, Libn. 

Purpose : To help employees keep up to 
date on new developments in their 
field and provide a source of reference 
materials 

Total vols : 550 ; Pams : 1,200 

New Titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 60 

Expenditures : $1,500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. IN- 
STITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION 
AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING LI- 
BRARY. 1301 S, 46th St. Tel: BE 
5-6009, ext. 239. Beverly Hickok, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; IJ others 
Purpose : To serve institute staff and 
graduate students as well as the pub- 
lic concerning all phases of transpor- 
tation, especially highway and air 
transportation 
Total vols : 8,652 ; Pams : 15,283 
New Titles : 2,000 
Subs : Mags : 444 ; Newsp : 4 
Expenditures : .$3,300 ; Circ : 3,100 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; film library ; recordings 
(tape or disc) 



REDG£CREST (Kern Co.) 

BURROUGHS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Jessie L. Riffe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; -J clerk 

Book fund : $2^080 ; Circ : 8,358 

Total vols : 4,191 ; New : 851 

Subs : Mags : 72 : Newsp : 4 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 882 ; Grades : 9-12 



i 



RIO LilMDA (Saercamento Cs.) 

RIO LINDA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 12th and G Sts. Mrs. Pfeiffer, 
Libn. 

RBO VISTA (Solano Co.) 

RIO VISTA JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Mariana 
Harden, Libn. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



181 



RiVEI^DALE (Fresno Co.) 

RIVERDALE JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mt. Whitney St. 
Mrs. Charlotte Sawyers, Libn. 



RiVERSIDE (Riverside Co.) 

CENTRAL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4795 Magnolia. Marjorie 
Wintz, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 18,035 

Total vols : 5,829 ; New : 791 

Subs : Mags : 33 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 59 ; Stud : 1,425 ; Grades : 7-9 

CHEMAWA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 8830 Magnolia. Verna B. Mc- 
Keehan, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,800 ; Circ : 17,097 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 600 

Subs : Mags : 43 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 49 ; Stud : 1,163 ; Grades : 7-9 

JURUPA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 8700 Galena St. Verl N. 
Vyolfe, Libn. 

.Staff: 1 libn; i clerk 
I Book fund : $3,600 

Total vols : 3,578 ; New : 348 

Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 48 ; Grades : 7-9 

POLYTECHNIC HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
iBRARY. 3575 Terracina. Winifred 
Turner, Libn. 

^ Staff: 2 1ibns; 1 clerk 
Book fund: $5,000; Circ: 30,333 
■Total vols : 11,104 ; New : 989 
Subs : Mags : 130 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 110 ; Stud : 2,163 ; Grades : 10-12 

RAMONA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
7675 Magnolia Ave. Louise Didden, 
Libn. 

.Staff: 2 libns; 1 clerk 
;Book fund : $7,500 ; Circ : 35,841 
iTotal vols : 11,572 ; New : 2,468 
'Subs : Mags : 107 ; Newsp : 6 
iFac : 122 ; Stud : 2,470 ; Grades : 10-12 

(RIVERSIDE CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 3650 Fairfax Ave. Dr. Wil- 
liam Haarstad, Libn. 
'JSee Junior College Libraries table. 

IRIVERSIDE CITY SCHOOLS DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. 3954 12th St. Mil- 
dred Brown, Libn. 

^S'ee centralized school libraries table. 

(RIVERSIDE COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 7th and Orange Sts. Albert 
iC. Lake, Libn. 

'Serves : Entire county 

Contracts with : Riverside Public Li- 

; brary 

'Affiliated with : Banning, Beaumont, 

I Palo Verde Valley (Blythe), Coa- 
chella. Corona, Elsinore, Hemet, In- 
dio, Perris, San .Jacinto, Welwood 
Murray Memorial (Palm Springs) 



Outlets : 81 

Branches : Arlington, Marcy 

Stations : Aguanga, Cabazon, Casa 
Blanca, Canyon Crest, Cathedral 
City, Desert Center, Desert Hot 
Springs, Eagle Mountain, Glen Avon, 
Highgrove, Idyllwild, La Sierra, Lin- 
coln Park, Midland, Norco, Nuview, 
Oasis, Palm Desert, Ripley, Rubi- 
doux, Sunnymead, Temecula, Ther- 
mal, Valle Vista 

Bookmobile stops : 13 

Schools : 30 

RIVERSIDE CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Riverside. 

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7th 
and Orange Sts. Albert C. Lake, Libn. 
Distributing agencies listed under River- 
side Co. F. L. 

RUBIDOUX HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4250 Opal. Bertha M. Lor- 
enz, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $7,000 ; Circ : 13,500 
Total vols: 5,390; New: 2,547 
Subs : Mags : 106 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 44 ; Grades : 10-12 

SIERRA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY, 4950 Central Ave. Mrs. Co- 
rinne E. Smith, Libn. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LI- 
BRARY. Riverside. Edwin T. Coman, 
Jr., Libn. 

Branches or Departmental Libraries : 
Agricultural Sciences Library (for- 
merly Citrus Experiment Station Li- 
brary), Physical Sciences Library. 

See universities table. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 
CITRUS RESEARCH CENTER AND 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION LIBRARY. Tel: OV 4-2210, 
ext. 431 and 432. Mrs. Kathryn For- 
rest, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 2i others 
Purpose : To furnish information and 
assistance for the Citrus Research 
Center staff members, visiting re- 
search scientists, letters and science 
faculty ; graduate and undergraduate 
agricultural students. 
Total vols : 21,387 : Pams : 3,649 
New Titles : 900 ; VF drawers : 9 
Subs : Mags : 645 ; Newsp : 1 
Special collections : Avocado collection ; 
citrus fruits ; citrus industry in Cali- 
fornia ; all USDA publications and 
Agricultural Experiment Station pub- 
lications 
Expenditures : $12,1-50 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; film li- 
brary ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



182 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



RIVERSIDE-Continued 

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2060 8th St. 
Dorothy Hirschberg, Libn. 

ROCKLIN (Placer Co.) 

SIERRA COLLEGE LIBRARY. P.O. 
Box 789, Lee Mine Rd. at Hwy. 40. 
Mrs. Elma L. Clark Young, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

ROLLING HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) 

CHADWICK SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
4040 W. Palos Verdes Dr. N. Klaus K. 
Knab, Libn. 

ROSEMEAD (Los Angeles Co.) 

Rosemead High School Library, see 
Under El Monte. 



ROSEVILLE (Placer Co.) 

ROSEVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY.557 
Lincoln St. Mrs. Alice E. Ickes, Libn. 
Contracts with : Placer Co. F. L. 
Stations : 1 

ROSEVILLE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Campo St. 

ROSS (Marin Co.) 

THE KATHARINE BRANSON 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Fernhill Ave. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Spangenberg, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $400 ; Giro : 872 

Total vols : 6,539 ; New : 223 

Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 25 ; Stud : 167 ; Grades : 9-12 



SACRAMENTO (Sacramento Co.) 

AEROJET- GENERAL CORP., 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 
1947, Sacramento 9. Dr. Dan T. Bed- 
sole, Libn. Tel: YU 5-5111, ext. 6343. 
Staff : 5 libns : 20 others 
Purpose : To provide technical informa- 
tion and library services needed at 
Sacramento Plants of Aerojet-General 
Corp. 
Total vols : 18,500 ; Pams : 50,000 
Subs : Mags : 614 ; Newsp : 10 
Special collections : Chemistry, Engi- 
neering, Rocket Propulsion, Rocket 
Propellants, Rocketry, Mathematics, 
Science, Trade Catalog Collection 
Available to: Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscrip- 
tions 



AMERICAN RIVER JUNIOR COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 4700 College Oak 
Dr. Dr. Robert C. Jones, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

BISHOP ARMSTRONG HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4515 Sacramento 
Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL 
ACADEMY LIBRARY. Meadowview 
Rd. near 24th St. 

CALIFORNIA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 2991 Land Park Dr. Sacra- 
mento 18. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. Li- 
brary and Courts BIdg., P.O. Box 2037, 
Sacramento 9. Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, 
State Librarian. 

For annual statistical summary, see 
page 2, Sutro Library see San Fran- 
cisco. 

CALIFORNIA-WESTERN STATES 
LIFE INSURANCE CO. LIBRARY. 
21st and L Sts. 

C. K. McCLATCHY S R. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3066 Freeport 
Blvd. Jeanette F. Craig, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,375 ; Circ : 18,391 

Total vols : 9,419 ; New : 611 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac: 117; Stud: 2,426; Grades: 10-12 

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 21st and Broadway, Sac- 
ramento 18. 

EL CAMINO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4300 El Camino Ave. Frances ; 
M. Smith, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; ^ clerk 
Book fund : 3,750 ; Circ : 13,237 
Total vols : 5,462 ; New : 1,075 
Subs : Mags : 102 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 79 ; Grades : 9-12 

FERN BACON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4141 Turnbridge Dr., Sac- 
ramento 21. Miss Sydney Liersch, 
Libn. 

HIRAM W. JOHNSON SR. HIGH I 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6879 14th Ave. 

Evelyn K. Stewart, Libn. 

Staff: 2 libn; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $8,000 

Total vols : 5,067 ; New : 2,066 

Newsp : 3 

Fac : 106 ; Stud : 2,108 ; Grades 10-12 

JOAQUIN MILLER JR. HIGH< 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4701 Joaquin 

Way. Mrs. Lillian Altman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1,200 ; Circ : 18,853 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 349 

Subs : Mags : 93 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 76 ; Stud : 1,750 ; Grades : 7-9 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



183 



KIT CARSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1324 54th St. Frances 
Graves, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Book fund : $950 ; Circ : 22,000 

Total vols : 3,550 ; New : 233 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 53 ; Stud : 1,120 ; Grades : 7-9 

LINCOLN JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 418 P St. Midori Enkoji, 
Libn. 

IVIcGEORGE COLLEGE OF LAW LI- 
BRARY. 3282 5th Ave., P.O. Box 
2670. Herbert V. Clayton, Libn. 

Staff: 2 

Total vols : 9,136 ; New : 4,385 

Subs : Mags : 14 

Open to public ; mainly reference 

MARY GLIDE GOETHE MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY OF RELIGIOUS EDUCA- 
TION. 3720 Folsom Blvd., Sacramento 
16. 

Note : Operated by Sacramento Council 
of Churches. 

PAUL H. GUTMAN LIBRARY OF 
THE SACRAMENTO COUNTY SO- 
CIETY FOR MEDICAL IMPROVE- 
MENT. 5380 Elvas Ave., Sacramento 
16. 

PETER LASSEN JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 5022 58th St., Sacramento 
20. 

SACRAMENTO BEE REFERENCE 
LIBRARY. 21st and Q Sts. 

SACRAMENTO CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY, 3835 Freeport Blvd. Mrs. 
Marie Erwin, Libn. 

See junior college libraries tahle. 

SACRAMENTO CITY LIBRARY. 9th 
and I Sts. Dorothy Drake, Libn. 
Branches : 5 
Bookmobile stops : 24 

^SACRAMENTO CITY UNIFIED 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 1619 N St., Sac- 
ramento 10. Bernice Braden, Libn. 

\8ee centralized school libraries tatle. 

[SACRAMENTO COUNTY FREE Ll- 
iBRARY. 914 7th St., Sacramento 14. 
I Frederick A. Wemmer, Libn. 
Serves : entire county except Sacramento 

City 
Outlets : 25 

Contract Branches : Antelope, Court- 
! land, Fruitridge, Wilton 
Stations : Arcade, Arden, Carmichael, 
i Del Paso, Elk Grove, Fair Oaks, 
' Florin, Folsom, Foothill, Gait, Hag- 
ginwood, Isleton, North Highlands, 
North Sacramento, Orangevale, Ran- 
cho Cordova, Rio Linda, South Sacra- 
mento, Sylvan, Walnut Grove 

i SACRAMENTO CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
I Courthouse, 6th and I Sts. 



SACRAMENTO CO. SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. 3257 Folsom Blvd. Harlow 
W. Clarke, Dir. 

See centralized school libraries taile. 

SACRAMENTO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2315 34th St. Dean W. Greg- 
ory, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns. 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 31,500 

Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 1,000 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 8 

Fac : 142 ; Stud : 2,800 ; Grades : 10-12 

SACRAMENTO STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 6000 J St. Alan D. Covey, 
Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

ST. FRANCIS GIRLS' HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2529 K St., Sac- 
ramento 16. 

ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 815 G St., Sac- 
ramento 14. Sister Mary Aquin, Libn. 

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS LIBRARY. 
1115 K St., Sacramento 14. 

STANFORD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3545 Sacramento Blvd., Sac- 
ramento 17. Mrs. Annalee Murphy, 
Libn. 

STATE AUDITOR-GENERAL LI- 
BRARY. 2169 State Capitol. 

STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZA- 
TION, LAW LIBRARY. 1020 N St. 
Mildred L. Washborn, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : The law library serves the 
State Board of Equalization ; pri- 
marily the Legal Section 

Total vols : 3,800 ; Pams : 300 

New titles : 196 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 23 

Special collections : Law, taxes, admin- 
istration and management 

Circ : mainly a reference library 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

Services : photostat copying 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRI- 
CULTURE LIBRARY. 1220 N St., 

Sacramento 14. Tei: HI 5-4711, Ext. 

3992. Mrs. Barbara Prior, Libn. 

Staff : 1 other 

Purpose : Reference library for agricul- 
ture 

Total vols: 1,500; Pams: lOO's 

VF drawers, 8 

Subs : Mags : 171 ; Newsp : 21 

Circ : Reference only 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching 



184 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SACRAMENTO— ConttrBued 

STATE DEPT. OF CONSERVATION, 
DEPT. OF FISH AND GAME, DEPT. 
OF PARKS & RECREATION LI- 
BRARY. State Office B!dg. 1, Sac'to. 
14. Tel: HI 5-4711, Ext. 5817. Mrs. 
Evelyn Oathout, Libn. 
Staff : 1.5 libns ; 1 other 
Purpose : To provide library services for 
supporting agencies. Special strength 
in freshwater fisheries and forestry, 
as well as management, statistics, su- 
pervision material 
Total vols : 4,657 ; Pams : 8,000 
New titles : 1,200 ; VF drawers ; 2 
Subs : Mags : 280 ; Newsp : 3 
Special collections : Special strength in 
freshwater fisheries and forestry ; bi- 
ology, zoology, zoonoses, recreation, 
personnel management. 
Expenditures: $14,037; Circ. 17,025 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; biblio- 
graphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCA- 
TION. Division of Libraries, see Cali- 
fornia State Library. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCA- 
TION, CURRICULUM LABORA- 
TORY. 721 Capitol Ave., Room 455. 
Tel: HI 5-4711, Ext. 6857. Dr. Robert 
E. Browne, Dir. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 
Purpose : To assist county school offices 
and district offices in compiling curri- 
culum materials for use in elementary 
and secondary schools 
Pams : 500 
Special collections : Curriculum guides 

and courses of study 
Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF FI- 
NANCE LIBRARY. 1127 11th St., Rm. 
918, Sacramento 14. Tel: HI 5-4711, 
Ext. 5931. David C. Anderson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 
Purpose : Research tool for Dept. of Fi- 
nance personnel. Circulating techni- 
cal library for city and county plan- 
ning dept. personnel 
Special collections : Current state 
budgets ; administration of state gov- 
ernment ; California city and county 
master plans ; zoning and subdivision 
ordinances 
Expenditures : $3,682 ; Circ : 2,449 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Bibliographies ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions 



[PARTMENT OF PUBLIC 1 

DIV. OF HIGHWAYS, 1 

)EPT. LIBRARY. 1120 N ^ 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF FISH 
AND GAME AND DEPARTMENT 
OF NATURAL RESOURCES LI- 
BRARY. State Office BIdg. No. 1, 
Sacramento 14. Tel: HI 5-4711, Ext. 
5817. Mrs. Evelyn C. Oathout, Libn. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. LAW LIBRARY. 1120 N St. 
Marion Bradsha'/v, in charge. 

STATE DEI 

WORKS. 

BRIDGE Dl 

St., Sacramento 14. Tel: HI 5-4711, 

Ext. 3966. Mrs. Ruby E. Rosenthal, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Engineering, hydraulic, geo- 
logic and hydrologic reference mate- 
rials for use of state employees. Ref- 
erence research is done by librarian 
specifically for the dept. 

Total vols : 4,000 ; Pams : 3,500 

New titles : 900 ; VF drawers : 60 

Subs : Mags : 250 

Special collections : American Society 
of Civil Engineers Proceedings and 
Transactions, various technical engi- 
neering references, USGS topographic 
maps. USGS Water Supply Papers, 
Civil Engineering Magazine 

Circ : 3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; film li- 
brary ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

DIV. OF HIGHWAYS. MATE- 



RIALS AND RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 5900 Foisom. Tel: HI 5-4711 
and GL 2-5481. 

DIV. OF HIGHWAYS. PLAN- 



NING SURVEY LIBRARY. 1120 N 
St., Tel: HI 5-4711, Ext. 3230. Vivian 
Brady, Libn. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL 
WELFARE LIBRARY. 722 Capitol 
Ave., Sacramento 14. Tel: HI 5-4711, 
Ext. 5419. Mrs. Dilla Ludlow, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To provide reference materials 
for employees of the department in 
the field of social welfare 

Total vols : 1,050 ; Pams : 12,000 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Social service ; pub- 
lic welfare ; child welfare ; aging ; mi- 
gi'atory labor ; reports of State Wel- 
fare Departments 

Expenditures : .$3,400 ; Circ : 10,213 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



185 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF WATER 
RESOURCES, LAW & ENGINEER- 
ING LIBRARY. 1021 21st St., P.O. 
Box 388. Tel: HI 5-4711, Ext. 3372 or 
2013. Mrs. Irene A. Mullnix, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 9 others 
Purpose : To furnish library services to 
a staff of approximately 2,000 tech- 
nical and professional staff of engi- 
neers, attorneys, geogolists, soil techni- 
cians, economists and other specialists 
working in the water resources field. 
Total vols : 8,200 ; Pams : 11,500 
New titles : 1,500 ; VF drawers : 4 
Subs : Mags : 156 ; Newsp. 30 
Special collections : Hydraulic engineer- 
ing ; agricultural engineering ; hydrau- 
lic construction ; water requirements 
and development ; and all phases of 
Water Law 
Expenditures : $15,300 ; Circ : 7,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral (telephone calls 
only ) . 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
film library ; centralized procurement 
of publications and subscriptions 

STATE LEGISLATIVE BUDGET 
COMMITTEE LIBRARY. Rm. 306, 
State Capitol. 

STATE LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL 
LIBRARY. 3021 State Capitol. Mrs. 
Helen C. Nardi, Libn. 

Staff : 2 ; 1 part time ; Income : 

$16,199.63 
Total vols : 14,506 ; New : 376 
Subs : Mags : 86 
Not open to public 

SUTTER JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3150 i St., Sacramento 14. 
Eleanor Beach, Libn. 

U.S. DEPT. OF THE INTERIOR, 
BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, RE- 
GIONAL LIBRARY. Fulton and Mar- 
coni Aves. Mrs. Verle L. Carey, Libn. 
Tel: IV 9-7631, ext. 457. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 
Purpose : To serve the technical staff of 
the Bureau of Reclamation in the 
Sacramento office and the many field 
offices in California 
Total vols : 19,000 
Expenditures : $1,000 ; Circ : 32,928 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 



ST. HELENA (Napa Co.) 

SAINT HELENA HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 473 Main Street. George 
Davis, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $500 

Total vols : 2,015 ; New : 123 



Subs : Mags : 11 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 15 ; Stud : 314 ; Grades : 9-12 

ST. HELENA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Oak and Adams St. Alice Armstrong, 
Libn. 



ST. MARY'S COLLEGE (Contra Costa Co.) 

ST. MARY'S COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
William P. Macaskill, Libn. 
See state and other jour-year colleges 
table. 



SALINAS (Monterey Co.) 

EL SAUSAL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1155 E. Alisal St. 

HARTNELL COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
156 Homestead Ave. Luelia Wiens, 
Libn. 

See junior college liiraries table. 

MONTEREY COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 26 Central Ave. Mrs. Lois 
Koolwyk, Libn, 

Serves : Entire county except Monterey 
and Pacific Grove. 

Contracts with : Salinas Public Library 

Affiliated with : Harrison Memorial Li- 
brary (Carmel) and King City Public 
Library 

Outlets: 84 

Branches : Emerson 

Stations : Alisal, Aromas, Bernabe, Big 
Sur, Bolsa Knolls, Boy's Ranch, 
Bradley, Carmel Valley, Castroville, 
Chualar, County Detention Farm, 
County Hospital, County Juvenile 
Hall, Curriculum Department, Gon- 
zales, Greenfield, Jamesburg, Lock- 
wood, Marina, Pajaro, Parkfield, 
Prunedale, Robley, San Ardo, San 
Lucas, Soledad, Special Education, 
Spreckels 

Bookmobile stops : 29 

Schools : 23 

MONTEREY CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. 

MONTEREY CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. 

NORTH SALINAS HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 55 Kip Drive. Mrs. Greta 
Flores, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $7,000 

Total vols : 4,500 ; New : 1,400 

Subs : Mags : 78 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,172 ; Grades : 9-12 

SALINAS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 726 S. Main. Anne Harder, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,1.50 ; Circ : 15,200 

Total vols : 10,3-50 ; New : 700 

Subs : Mags : 85 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades : 10-12 



186 



NEWS NOTES OE CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SALINAS— Continued 

SALINAS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 110 
W. San Luis. John Ward, Libn. 

Stations : 1 

WASHINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Iverson and Lang. Fern 
Rommel, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $l';500 ; Circ : 8,720 

Total vols : 4,808 ; New : 338 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 50 ; Stud : 1,200 ; Grades : 7-9 



SAN ANDREAS (Calaveras Ce.) 

CALAVERAS COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. Main St. Roxie Hall, Libn. 
Serves : Entire county 
Outlets : 15 

Stations : Angels Camp, Calaveras 
Higb School, Camanclie, Copperop- 
olis, Fricot Ranch School, Mark 
Twain Hospital, Mokelumne Hill, 
Murphys, Paloma, Rail Road Flat, 
Sheepraneh, Valley Springs, West 
Point, White Pines 

CALAVERAS CO. LAW LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. 

CALAVERAS CO. SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. Box 518. Mrs. Isabel M. 
Hastings, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries taile. 

CALAVERAS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Madeline Cavagnaro, Libn. 



SAN ANSELMG (iVieiirm Co.) 

SAN ANSELMO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Tunstead Ave. Mrs. Virginia Stewart, 
Libn. 

SAN FRANCISCO THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY. Dr. Francis 
L. Bouquet, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

SIR FRANCIS DRAKE HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1327 Sir Francis 
Drake Blvd. Mrs. Ruth P. Taylor, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,750 ; Circ : 20,000 

Total vols : 8,200 ; New : 700 

Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 68 ; Stud : 1,365 ; Grades : 9-12 



SAN BSRNAilDi^30 (San Berncirdisio Co.) 

ARROWVIEW JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Highland Ave. and G St. 

FRANKLIN JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1290 Muscatt St. 

FREMONT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3173 Kerry St. Mrs. Florence 
Corrigan, Libn. 



GOLDEN VALLEY JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3800 Waterman 
Ave. Leala Murphy, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $3,000 

Total vols : 63,000 

Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 49 ; Stud : 1,000 ; Grades : 7-9 

HIGHLAND JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Central and Pacific. Roy F. 
Barker, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,700 ; Circ : 54,000 

Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 800 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 51 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 7-9 

PACIFIC HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1020 Pacific Ave. Eldred C. Jones, 
Libn. 

RIALTO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 324 North Palm, Rialto. 
(San Bernardino city schools). P. B. 
Ledbetter, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,700 ; Circ : 18,000 
Total vols : 5,200 ; New : 400 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 45 ; Stud : 1,130 ; Grades : 7-9 

RICHARDSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mill and K Streets. Ray 
Olson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,100 ; Circ : 12,000 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 200 

Newsp : 1 

Stud : 530 ; Grades : 7-9 

SAN BERNARDINO CITY 
SCHOOLS, PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. 799 F Street. Dora C. Buzzi, 
Asst. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 
FREE LIBRARY. 364 Mt. View Ave. 
Dorothy Traver, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Ontario, 
Redlands, San Bernardino and Up- 
land 

Affiliated with : Colton Public Library 

Outlets : 168 

Branches : Fontana 

Stations: Adelanto, Alta Loma, Apple 
Valley, Baker, Barstow, Big Bear, 
Bloomington, Boys Republic, Chino, 
Countv Hospital, County Juvenile 
Hall, ' Crestline, Cucamonga, East 
Valley, Essex, Etiwanda, Glen Helen, 
Highland, Hinkley, Joshua Tree, 
Kelso, Lake Arrowhead, Lucerne, 
Mentone, Montclair, Morongo, Mt. 
Baldy, Mountain Pass, Muscoy, 
Needles, Oro Grande, Parker Dam, 
Rialto, Rice, Running Springs, 
Trona, Twentynine Palms, Verde- 
mont, Victorville, Yermo, Tucaipa, 
Yucca. 

Bookmobile stops : 48 community and 
16 school 

Schools : 88 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



187 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LAW 
LIBRARY. Room 201, Courthouse. 
Beulah M. Brown, Libn. 

Staff : 1 ; Income : $5,400 
Total vols : 14,809 ; New : 221 
Subs : Blags : 22 
Open to public 

SAN BERNARDINO CO. SCHOOLS, 
CURRICULUM LABORATORY & 
PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. Hal! of 
Records. Mrs. Stella G. Bolles, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN BERNARDINO PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 401 N. Arrowhead Ave. How- 
ard M. Rowe, Libn. 

Branches : 2 
Stations : 1 

SAN BERNARDINO SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 18th and E Sts. 

SAN BERNARDINO VALLEY COL- 
LEGE LIBRARY. 701 S. Mt. Vernon 
Ave, Laura K. Mitchell, Acting Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

STURGES JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Eighth and E Sts. Norma C. 
Parker, Libn. 

U.S. AIR FORCE, SAN BERNAR- 
DINO AIR MATERIEL AREA LI- 
BRARY. Norton Air Force Base. Tel: 
TU 9-4411, Ext. 7119. Sidney M. 
Hequembourg, Libn. 



SAN BRU^SO (Sean JVIsiteo Co.) 

CAPUCHINO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 900 Hacienda Dr. Robert G. 
Sumpter, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $4,800 ; Circ : 22,900 

Total vols : 11,600 ; New : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 130 ; Newsp : 11 

Fac : 97 ; Stud : 1,856 ; Grades : 9-12 

JSAN BRUNO PARK SCHOOL DIS- 
[TRICT LIBRARY. 500 Acacia. Clar- 
ence Fogelstrom, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN BRUNO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Civic Center. Thelma F. Passo, Libn. 

U.S. NAVY. TWELFTH NAVAL 
DIST. PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, 
TECHNICAL LIBRARY. Naval Dist. 
Public Works Office B!dg., B101. 

SAM BOENAVEi^TURA (Ventura Co.) 

See under Ventura. 



SAH CARLOS (San Mcsteo Co.) 

jLENKURT ELECTRIC LIBRARY. 
1105 County Rd. 



SAN CARLOS ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 826 Chestnut. 
William G. Richmond, Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 



SAN DIEGO (Sean Diego Co.) 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 150 S. 49th St, 
Mrs. Hester M. Kylio, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,587 
Total vols : 1,758 ; New : 568 
Subs : Mags : 84 ; Newsp : 3 
Grades : 10-12 

CALIFORNIA WESTERN UNIVER- 
SITY LIBRARY. 3902 Lomaland Dr. 
Dr. Hazel Pulling, Libn. 

Departmental libraries : Law library and 
curriculum materials library 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

CLAIREMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4150 Ute Dr. James H. 
Adams, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $6,000 ; Circ : 38,000 
Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 1,700 
Subs : Mags : 134 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 85 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 10-12 

COLLIER JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4302 Valeta St., S.D. 6. Lee 
Curtice, Libn. 

CRAWFORD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 4191 55th St. Mrs. Frances 
R. Pettit, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Circ : 19,451 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 97 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 85 ; Stud : 1,950 ; Grades : 10-12 

E. R. SNYDER CONTINUATION 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1372 12th 
Ave. Ruth Hilyard, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Book fund: $1,270; Circ: 24,451 (in- 
cludes loans to 3 branches) 
Total vols : 6,437 ; New : 480 
Subs : Mags : 37 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 38 ; Stud : 857 ; Grades : 8-12 

FOURTH DISTRICT COURT OF 
APPEAL LAW LIBRARY. 620 Ash 
St., S.D. 1. 

FRANCIS W. PARKER SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4201 Randolph St., S.D. 3. 
Emilie Crockett, Libn. 

GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP., GEN- 
ERAL ATOMIC DIV. LIBRARY. 2969 
Barnard St. 



188 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN DIEGO— Continued 

GENERAL DYNAMICS - CONVAIR 
ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 3302 Pa- 
cific Highway. Tel: CY 6-6611, ext. 
1835. Keith G. Blair, Libn. 

Stafe : 4 libns ; 10 others 

Purpose : To serve technical library re- 
quirements of Engineering Depart- 
ment 

Total vols : 16,306 ; documents : 76,930 

New titles: 2,000 books, 18,000 docu- 
ments 

Subs : Mags : 507 

Special collections : Aerospace tech- 
nologv 

Expenditures : $30,000 ; Circ : 30,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; transla- 
tions, personal book purchase 

GEORGE W. MARSTON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3799 Ciairemont 
Dr., S.D. 17. Jacqueline Caffee, Libn. 

GOVERNMENTAL REFERENCE 
LIBRARY. Rm. 384, Civic Center, S.D. 
I.Tel: BE 9-7511, ext. 330. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth N. Les, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 2 others 
Purpose : Maintained jointly by the City 
and County of San Diego under the 
supervision of the San Diego Public 
Library, for the use and benefit of 
ofiicers and employees of the City and 
County of San Diego 
Total vols : 4,228 ; Pams : 8,483 
New titles : 1,860 ; VF drawers : 20 
Subs : Mags : 289 ; Newsp : 5 
Special collections : Municipal and 
county administration ; personnel ; po- 
lice ; engineering ; fire ; public health ; 
public works ; recreation ; water sup- 
ply ; planning ; public welfare 
Expenditures : $3,750 ; Circ : 42,402 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; city and county newspaper 
clipping service ; depository San Diego 
City and County documents 

HERBERT HOOVER SR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 4474 El Cajon 

Blvd. Phyllis K. Kefalas, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,657 ; Circ : 31,603 

Total vols : 13,365 ; New : 935 

Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 96 ; Stud : 2,438 ; Grades : 10-12 

HORACE MANN JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 4345 54th St., S.D. 15. 
Beverly E. Anderson, Libn. 

INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICAL 
SCIENCES LIBRARY. 3380 N. Har- 
bor Dr., S.D. 1. 



JOHN J. MONTGOMERY JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2470 Ulric St. 

Mrs. Jeanette B. Stone, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,354 ; Circ : 28,295 

Total vols : 8,036 ; New : 1,186 

Subs : Mags : 48 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 92 ; Stud : 2,345 ; Grades : 7-9 

KEARNY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
7651 Wellington St., Irma S. Durr, 

I ihn 

staff': 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,779 ; Circ : 13,245 

Total vols : 7,019 ; New : 542 

Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 59 ; Stud : 1,367 ; Grades : 10-12 

KELCO CO. LIBRARY. 530 Broad- 
way, S.D. 1. 

LUCE, FORWARD, HAMILTON & 
SCRIPPS LAW LIBRARY. 1220 San 
Diego Trust & Savings Bank Bldg., 
530 Broadway, S.D. 1. H. R. Holly- 
wood, Libn. 
Staff : 1 

Total vols : 7,500 ; New : 150 
Subs : Mags : 25 
Not open to public 

Remarks : This library is the private 
law library open to members of this 
firm and a few selected members of 
the building and contains basically 
the California, Federal and Western 
States Reporter Systems including a 
variety of textbooks and specialized 
volumes 

MEMORIAL JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2884 Marcy Ave. Martha L. 
Heuer, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,498 ; Circ : 15,426 
Total vols : 10,988 ; New : 2,438 
Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac: 63; Stud: 1,680 (extended day, 

594) ; Grades : 7-9 ; evening high 

school offered 

MERCY COLLEGE OF NURSING 
LIBRARY. 510 E. Lewis St., S.D. 3. 
Miss F. Dalton, Libn. 

MERCY HOSPITAL LIBRARY. Hill- 
crest Dr., S.D. 3. 

MILDRED L. HALE JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5251 Mt. Alifan 
Dr. Frances E. Crowe, Libn. 

MISSION BAY HIGH SCHOOL LI 
BRARY. 2475 Grand Ave. Mrs. Mil- 
dred Stites, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,652 ; Circ : 22,227 
Total vols : 7,859 ; New : 586 
Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 4 
Stud : 1,237 ; Grades : 10-12 

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM LI- 
BRARY. Balboa Park, S.D. 1. Tel: 
BE 2-9146. Mrs. Mildred H. Meeder, 
Libn. ,, 

Staff : 1 libn 



VOLUME ^"J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



189 



Purpose : Research for museum staff, 
background for museum exhibits 

Total vols : 80,000 ; Pams : 1,000 

New titles : 100 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 5,000 

Special collections : Gen. A. W. Vogdes 
Library of Geology and Paleontology ; 
Biology, Geology, Paleontology 

Expenditures : $700 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loans : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; verifax 
copying 

PACIFIC BEACH JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 4676 Ingraham St. Jeanne 

C. Newhouse, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,150 ; Circ : 22,338 

Total vols : 5,771 ; New : 467 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 8 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 7-9 

POINT LOMA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2335 Chatsworth Blvd., S.D. 6. 

REES-STEALY MEDICAL CLINIC 
LIBRARY. 2001 Fourth Ave., S.D. 1. 
Tel: BE 2-2171. iVirs. Margaret 
O'Rourke, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : Serves medical staff of the 
clinic, the Clinics Research Founda- 
tion and the clinics school of medical 
technology 
' Total vols : 5,600 
i Subs : Mags : 135 

1 Special collections : Medicine and allied 
i fields, particularlv biochemistry 
Expenditures : $1,200 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
■ Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
\ quest 

Services : Literature searching ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 

RICHARD HENRY DANA JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1775 Chatsworth 
Blvd., S.D. 7. 

ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3366 Park Blvd. Wanda 
Wiltse, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
iBook fund : $2,500 
Total vols : 10,500 ; New : 400 
Subs : Mags : 52 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 68 ; Stud : 1,650 ; Grades : 7-9 

{RYAN AERONAUTICAL CO., EN- 
jGINEERING LIBRARY. Lindbergh 
iField, S.D. 12. Tel: CY 6-6681, Ext. 

■1461. Philip Leslie, Libn. 
iStaff : 2 libns ; 6 others 

Purpose : Information service to com- 

\ Pany technical personnel 

'Total vols : 3,500 ; Reports : 45,000 

New titles : 5,400 ; VP drawers : 204 
I Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 4 



Special collections : Aerospace tech- 
nology 

Circ : 17,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest (unclassified only) 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying 

SAMUEL GOMPERS JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1005 47th St., 
S.D. 2. Mrs. Miriam B. Kerr, Libn. 

SAN DIEGO COLLEGE FOR WOM- 
EN LIBRARY. Alcala Park, S.D. 10. 
Mother Genevieve Clarke, Libn. 

SAN DIEGO CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 1425 Russ Blvd. Warren C. 
Heyer, Libn. Branches: Business Cam- 
pus Branch Library, 835 12th St., San 
Diego. 
Bee junior college libraries taile. 

SAN DIEGO CO. CURRICULUM LI- 
BRARY. 6401 Linda Vista Rd., S.D. 
11. Mrs. Lillian K. Spitzer, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries taile. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 3532 Meade Ave., S.D. 16. 
Frances A. Hahn, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Carlsbad, 
Chula Vista, Coronado, Escondido, 
National City, Oceanside, San Diego 
City 

Outlets : 58 

Branches : El Cajon, La Mesa, Enci- 
nitas. Lemon Grove, Vista 

Stations : Alpine, Banner Queen, Bor- 
rego. Boulevard, Caliente Springs, 
Campo, Cardiff, Castle Park, Del 
Mar, Descanso, Dulzura, Escondido, 
Fallbrook, Fletcher Hills, Grossmont, 
Imperial Beach, Jacumba, .Julian, 
Lakeside, Lincoln Acres, Mesa Grande, 
Pala, Palomar, Pauma, Potrero, Po- 
way, Ramona, Santee, Solana Beach, 
Spring Valley, Suncrest-La Cresta, 
Tierra del Sol, Witch Creek, Wynola 

Bookmobile stops : 17 

Schools : 1 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY GENERAL 
HOSPITAL, DOCTORS LIBRARY. 

North end of Front St., S.D. 3. Tel: 
CY 5-5131, ext. 231. Adelia P. Mus- 
tain, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Gift of Doctors on the attend- 
ing staff to the education of the In- 
terns and Residents 

Total vols : 2,118 

New titles : 70 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Clinical medicine 
with some coverage of basic sciences 

Expenditures : $1,650 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests of medical and allied personnel 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 



190 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN DIEGO— Conirinued 

SCHOOL OF NURSING LI- 



BRARY. Front St., S.D. 3 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. 1105 Front St., S.D. 1. Le- 
land G. Stanford, Libn. 

Staff : 7 ; Income : $107,065.94 
Total vols : 95,106 ; New : 3,210 
Subs : Mags : 350 
Open to public 

SAN DIEGO CO, MEDICAL SO- 
CIETY LIBRARY. 3427 Fourth Ave., 
S.D. 3. 

SAN DIEGO CO. SCHOOL LIBRARY 
SERVICE. 6401 Linda Vista Rd., S.D. 
11. Edna B. Ziebold, Dir. 

See centralized school Uiraries table. 

SAN DIEGO FINE ARTS GALLERY 
LIBRARY. Balboa Park, P.O. Box 
2107. Mrs. Audry Burton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : Study and research in art 
Total vols : 4,000 ; Pam : 4,500 
New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 12 
Subs : Mags : 20 
Expenditures : $700 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

SAN DIEGO GAS AND ELECTRIC 
COMPANY LIBRARY. 861 Sixth 
Ave., S.D. 1. 

SAN DIEGO HISTORICAL SO- 
CIETY, JUNIPERO SERRA MU- 
SEUM. P.O. Box 10248, S.D. 10. Mr. 
G. F. MacMullen, Director. Tel: CY 
7-3258. 
Staff : 3 

Purpose : To provide research material 
for students and any others engaged 
in the study of Pacific Southwest his- 
tory, with special emphasis on the 
history of the City and/or County of 
San Diego 
Total vols : 1,200 ; Pams : 1,150 
New titles : 25 ; VF drawers : 45 
Subs : Mags : 1 ; Newsp : 1 
Special collections : Bound newspaper 
files (incomplete) 1850-1948; Kerr 
Collection of California land titles ; 
biographical files ; military, Grand 
Army, and tax assessment rolls 
Expenditures : $25 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : Restricted 
Services : Literature searching ; briefing 
and abstracting; recordings (tape or 
disc) ; guided tours for schools 

SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF MAN LI- 
BRARY. Balboa Park, S.D. 1. 



San Diego Museum of Natural History 
Lilrary, see Natural History Mu- 
seum Library. 

SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 820 
E St., S.D. 1. Clara E. Breed, Libn. 
Branches : 14 
Stations : 3 
Bookmobile stops : 16 

San Diego Scientific Library, see Na- 
tural History Museum Library. 

SAN DIEGO SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 12th St. and Russ Blvd., S.D. 
2. 

SAN DIEGO STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 5402 College Ave. Dr. Louis 
A. Kenney, Libn. 
Branches or Departmental Libraries : 

Campus Laboratory School, Public 

Administration Laboratory. 
See state and other four-year colleges 

table. 

SAN DIEGO ZOOLOGICAL SO- 
CIETY LIBRARY. Balboa Park, S.D. 
1. Tel: BE 4-5151. No libn., technical 
services by librarian of Natural His- 
tory Museum. 

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE 
PUBLISHING CO. LIBRARY. 919 
Second Ave., S.D. 12. Tel: BE 4-7111. 
Mrs. Olga Webber, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 4 others 

Purpose : Research and service for edi- 
torial departments of San Diego 
Union and Evening Tribune and staff 
in general 

Total vols : 500 ; Pams : 1,200 

New titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 420 

Subs : Mags : 10 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Armed forces, San 
Diego port and shipping, aircraft, 
Latin America 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries i 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- I 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; film library ; cen- i 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

SOLAR AIRCRAFT COMPANY LI- 
BRARY. 2200 Pacific Highway, S.D. i 
12. Tel: BE 3-8241, ext. 611. Lucille D. 
Walper, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : Give service to others. 
Total vols : 3,000 ; Reports : 6,500 
New titles : 5,000 ; VF drawers : 5 
Subs : Mags : 200 ; Newsp : 24 
Special collections : Slides, catalogs, so- 

ciety papers, NASA reports, WADDj 

reports. 



VOLUME '^J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



191 



Expenditures : $1,200 ; Circ : 8,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying ; briefing «& abstracting ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions ; ordering ma- 
terials for Engineers. 

U.S. MARINE CORPS RECRUIT 
DEPOT LIBRARY. Tel. CY 8-3941, 
ext. 532. GySgt Winifred R. Green- 
berg, USMC. 

Staff : 2 

Purpose : To give general library service 
to Marine Corps personnel and their 
dependents. 

Total vols : lO.OOO ; Pams : 100 

New titles : 1,477 

Subs : Mags : 59, Newsp : 15 

Special collections : Marine Corps ma- 
terial. 

Circ : 33,174 

Available to : Co. staff. 

Interlibrary loan : to military libraries 
in San Diego area. 

Services : Literature searching. 

U.S. NAVAL AIR STATION, NORTH 

ISLAND LIBRARY. S.D. 35. Tel: HE 

5-6611, ext. 481. Louise Bidweil, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 2 others 

Purpose : To provide technical, educa- 
tional and recreational reading for 
personnel attached to the Station and 
their dependents. 

Total vols : 18,000 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 4 

Subs : Mags : 98 ; Newsp : 25 

Special collections : Naval aviation. 

Circ : 23,600 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Bibliographies. 

U.S. NAVAL HOSPITAL MEDICAL 
AND STATION LIBRARIES. Tel: 
BE 2-6951, Ext. 660. Sherrill McMil- 
lan, Libn. 

U.S. NAVAL TRAINING CENTER 
LIBRARY. Tel: AC 2-6411, ext. 287. 
Mrs. Audrey M. Saveli, Libn. 

' Staff : 3 libns. ; 4 others 
! Purpose : Provide technical, educational 
ji and recreational reading for Navy 
\ personnel, their dependents, and re- 
!; tired personnel. 

Total vols : 27,000; Pams : 525 

New titles : 750 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 10 

Special collections : Navy and military 
subjects, phonograph records. 

Expenditures : $1,900 ; Circ : 50,800 

Available to: Co. staff, other libraries. 
; Interlibrary loan: all libraries on re- 
i quest. 

Services : Literature searching. 



U.S. NAVY ELECTRONICS LABO- 
RATORY LIBRARY. Tel: AC 2-6311, 
ext. 525. Wm. E. Jorgensen, Libn. 

Staff : 6 libns. ; 7 clerks 

Purpose : To serve the Laboratory, its 
tenant activities, or Dept. of Defense 
activities and their contractors, and 
to a limited degree the public. 

Total vols : 29,137 ; Periodicals : 14,992 ; 
Pams : 6,850 ; Reports : 80,647 

New titles : 7,500 

Subs : Mags : 873 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Electronics, physics, 
mathematics, and oceanography. 

Circ : 95,100 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing & abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions. 

U.S. NAVY, ELEVENTH NAVAL 
DISTRICT HDQ. LIBRARY. 937 Har- 
bor Dr., S.D. 30. 

VAUCLAIN HOME LIBRARY. North 
End of Third Ave., S.D. 3. Harold L. 
Thurston, Libn. 

WOODROW WILSON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3737 El Cajon 
Blvd. Hollis Monzingo, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 27,127 

Total vols : 10,252 ; New : 934 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 92 ; Stud. 2,100 ; Grades 7-9 



SAN FERNANDO (Los Angeles Co.) 

JAMES MONROE HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 9229 Haskeilair. Clara L. 
Forman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 

Book fund: $1,680.11; Circ: 19,665 

Total vols : 5,516 ; New : 1,214 

Subs : Mags : 114 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 96 ; Stud : 2,292 ; Grades : 10-12 

OLIVE VISTA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 14600 Tyler St., Sylmar. 
Mildred E. Darby, Libn. 

QUEEN OF ANGELS SEMINARY 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1071. D. F. Mc- 
Neil, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 teach-libn. 
Book fund : $3,000 
Total vols : 8, 301 ; New : 1,749 
Subs : Mags : 68 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 13 ; Stud. 330 ; Grades 9-12 

SAN FERNANDO JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 130 N. Brand 
Blvd. John E. King, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; \ clerk 
Total vols : 11,000 ; New : 41 
Newsp : 1 
Grades 7-9 



7—54336 



192 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN FERNANDO-Continued 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 13000 Sayre 
St. Tel: EM 7-1911, ext. 333. Mrs. 
Carole Moore, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns. ; 1 other 

Total vols: 19,952 patients' lib.; 4,536 
medical lib. ; pams : 250 

New titles : 446 ; VF drawers : 8 

Subs : Mags : 130, Newsp : 15 

Expenditures : $3,800 ; Circ : 42,545 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphy 

SAN FRANCISCO (City and Co. 
coterminous) 

A. P. GIANNINI JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3151 Ortega St. Gloria 
Baxter & Mary Lou Heinz, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns. 

Book fund : $1,957.53 ; Circ : 27,442 

Total vols : 9,078 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 99 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 72 ; Stud. 1655 ; Grades 7-9 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2162 24th Ave. 
Martha E. Uhlir & Margaret Red- 
mond, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns. 

Book fund : $3,282 ; Circ : 17,986 

Total vols : 10,102 ; New : 657 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 110 ; Stud. 2,620 ; Grades 10'-12 

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE LIBRARY. 

414 Mason St., S.F. 2. Tel: SU 1-8755. 

Mrs. James Knapton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : The propagation of French 
culture. 

Total vols : 23,000 ; Pams : 1,000 

New titles : 150 

Subs : Mags : 6, Newsp : 3 

Circ : 1,500 

Available to : members only. 

Interlibrary loan : restricted. 

Services : literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies. 

AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE 
LIBRARY. 105 Embarcadero, S.F. 11. 

AMERICAN RUSSIAN INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY. 90 McAllister, S.F. 2. Rose 
Isaak, Libn. 

ANGLO CALIFORNIA NATIONAL 
BANK LIBRARY. 1 Sansome St., 
S.F. 20. 

APTOS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 105 Aptos Ave. Margaret 
Stoker, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn. 

Book fund : $2,075.25 ; Circ : 14,665 
Total vols : 8,487 ; New : 595 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 55 ; Stud. 1,320 ; Grades 7-9 



THE ASIA FOUNDATION LI- 
BRARY. 550 Kearny St., S.F. 8. Jane 
Wilson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 2 others 

Purpose : To provide reference service 
and research facilities for Foundation 
staff members. 

Total vols : 2,650 ; Pams 3,300 

New titles : 950 ; VF drawers : 78 

Subs : Mags : 402, Newsp : 41 

Special collections : Asian affairs. 

Expenditures : $3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions. 

ATHEARN, CHANDLER & HOFF- 
MAN LAW LIBRARY. 593 Market St. 
Murray Smith, Esq., Libn. 

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1000 Cayuga St. Leta P. Wheeler & 
June Farris, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns. 

Book fund : $4,389.09 ; Circ : 18,718 

Total vols : 13,652 ; New : 1,018 

Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 113 ; Stud. 2,444 ; Grades 10-12 

BANK OF AMERICA LAW LI- 
BRARY. 300 Montgomery St., S.F. 20. 

BANK OF AMERICA REFERENCE 

LIBRARY. 300 Montgomery. Tel: YU 

5-2069. Miriam Droege, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 

Purpose : General business library and 
reference service to assist bank per- 
sonnel in their work 

Total vols : 2,275 ; Pams : 10,000 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 28 

Subs: Mags: 160; Newsp: 15 

Special collections : Agriculture, bank- 
ing, economics, foreign trade (empha- 
sis on western states and countries in 
which Bank of America branches are 
located) 

Circ: 3,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

BAY AREA AIR POLLUTION CON- 
TROL DISTRICT LIBRARY. 1480 
Mission St. Tel: KL 2-1300. Gloria 
Smith, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 
Purpose : To maintain, chiefly in micro- 
film form, a collection of technical in- 
formation on air pollution for the use 
of the Bay Area residents 
Total accessions : 8,100 
New titles : 600 
Subs : Mags. 80 ; Newsp : 2 
Special collections : Measurement, effects I 
and control of air pollution 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



193 



Expenditures : 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to hard copy 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; film library ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions 

BECHTEL CORPORATION LI- 
BRARY. 220 Montgomery St., S. F. 4. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1430 Scott St. 
Harry O. Dalva, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 part-time 

Book fund : $1,751.63 ; Circ : 12,114 

Total vols : 5,018 ; New : 475 

Subs: Mags. 40; Newsp. 1 

Fac: 57; Stud. 1,245; Grades 7-9 

BETHLEHEM PACIFIC COAST 
STEEL CORP. LIBRARY. 20th and 
Illinois St., S. F. 19. 

BOHEMIAN CLUB LIBRARY. 624 
Taylor St., S. F. 3. Tel: TU 5-2440, 
Jolin J. Herzog, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn 

Purpose : The Bohemian Club Library 
was established to be used by mem- 
bers and guests. We have an out- 
standing collection of fine bindings, 
first editions, and works by several 
hundred well-known writers who 
were and are members of the club 

Total vols : 15,000 

New titles : 150 

Subs: Mags. 40; Newsp. 10 

Special collections : Collection of Bo- 
hemiana, photographs, autographs of 
distinguished guests 

Expenditures : $3,000 

Available to : Other libraries and public 
by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibli- 
ographies 

BRITISH INFORMATION SERV- 
ICES LIBRARY. 343 Sansome St., 
S. F. 4. Tel: YU 1-3030. Margaret R. 
Assert, Libn. 

Staff: 2 

Purpose : To answer (or refer to the 
correct source) all enquiries on all 
aspects of Britain, the Colonies, and 
Commonwealth 

Total vols : 4,000 ; Pams : 7,000 

New titles : 30 ; VF drawers : 20 

Subs : Mags. 15 ; Newsp. 7 

Special collections : Parliamentary de- 
bates, Keesing's Archives, social, po- 
litical, economic information 

Expenditures : Sent direct from Eng- 
land 

Circ: 7,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 



Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCI- 
ENCES LIBRARY. Golden Gate Park, 
S. F. 18. Tel: BA 1-5100. Veronica J. 
Sexton, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : Scientific research 

Total vols: 150,000; Pams: 150,000 

New titles : 15,000 ; VF drawers ; 12 

Special collections : Natural history and 

allied subjects 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF CHI- 
ROPODY. 1770 Eddy St., S. F. 15. 

CALIFORNIA GENEALOGICAL SO- 
CIETY LIBRARY. 690 Market St., 
S.F. 4. 

CALIFORNIA HISTORICAL SOCI- 
ETY LIBRARY. 2090 Jackson St., 
S. F. 9. Tel: JO 7-1848. James de T. 
Abajian, Libn. 

CALIFORNIA PACKING CORP., 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 215 Fremont St., S. F. 19. 
Margret M. Meyer, Libn. Tel: SU 
1-7760, Ext. 2731. 
Staff: 2 

Purpose : Reference library for staff 
Total vols : 872 ; Pams : many thou- 
sands 
Subs: Mags. 145 
Special collections : Food technology 

and food preservation 
Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

CALIFORNIA PODIATRY COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1770 Eddy St. Ellis Pizzi, 
Libn. 

See State and other four-year colleges 
table. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF ME- 
CHANICAL ARTS, LUX TECHICAL 
INSTITUTE AND WILMERDING 
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
LIBRARY. 2550 17th St., S. F. 3. 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY, SONS OF 
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION LI- 
BRARY. 690 Market St., S. F. 4. H. L. 
Mathewson, Secy. 

Staff: 1 

Purpose : Genealogical research 
Total vols : 5,000 ; Pams : 1,500 
Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

California State — 
See State — 



194 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN FRANCISCO-Continued 

CHINESE WORLD LIBRARY. 736 
Grant Ave,, S. F. 8. 

CITY ATTORNEY'S LAW LIBRARY. 
206 City Hall, S. F. 2. Helen T. Mootz, 
Libn. 

StafE: 1 

Total vols : 10,000 
Subs : Mags. 23 
Not open to public 

CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO LIBRARY. 50 Phelan Ave. 
Edward E. Sandys, Libn. 

See Junior College Libraries table. 

COGSWELL POLYTECHNICAL 
COLLEGE LIBRARY. 3000 Foisom 
St., S. F. 10. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS LIBRARY. A School of 
Dentistry. 344 14th St. Joseph N. 
Failli, Libn. 

See State and other four-year colleges 
tables 

COMMONWEALTH CLUB OF CAL- 
IFORNIA LIBRARY. Hotel St. Fran- 
cis, S. F. 19. 

CONTINUATION HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 1950 Mission St. Eugene 

E. Brussell, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libu ; 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $988.60 ; Circ : 6,480 

Total vols : 4,084 ; New : 97 

Subs : Mags. 67 ; Newsp. 1 

Fac : 26 ; Stud. 38.5 ; Grades 9-12 

CONVENT OF THE SACRED 
HEART LIBRARY. 2222 Broadway, 
S.F. 15. 

CROCKER - ANGLO NATIONAL 
BANK LIBRARY. 1 Sansome St., 
S. F. 20. Tel: YU 2-8000. Mrs. Isabella 
L. Nestor, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : To serve the staff and cus- 
tomers of the bank. Others are vre\- 
come by referral or because of special 
interests 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Photostat copying 

DONAHUE LIBRARY (CATHOLIC 
LIBRARY OF SAN FRANCISCO). 50 
Oak St., S. F. 2. 

EVERETT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 450 Church St. Helen W. 
Shands and Joan Johanns, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns 

Book fund : $2,282.48 ; Circ : 15,422 

Total vols : 7,874 ; New : 759 

Subs : Mags. 50 ; Newsp. 1 

Fac : 81 ; Stud. 1,800 ; Grades 7-9 



FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, RESEARCH LI- 
BRARY. 400 Sansome St., S. F. 20. 
Mrs. Jana M. Lhotka, Libn. Tel: EX 
7-1137. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 
Purpose : To render reference, research, 
and bibliographic services to our staff 
Total vols : 5,400 ; Pams : 2,000 
New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 20 
Subs : Mags : 57 ; Newsp : 10 
Special collections : Business, economics, 
finance ; Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle (1913-1961) 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 

FRANCISCO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY, 450 Chestnut. Veraine Hage- 
dorn, libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; ^ clerk 
Book fund: $1,478.15; Circ: 19,241 
Total vols : 8,459 ; New : 294 
Subs : Mags : 53 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 58 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 7-9 

GALILEO HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1150 Francisco St. Mabel E. White, 
Marian E. Smith, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,036.59 ; Circ : 17,294 

Total vols : 11,273 ; New : 675 

Subs : Mags : 61 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 93 ; Stud : 2,021 ; Grades : 10-12 

GEORGE WASHINGTON HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 600 32d Ave. 
Barbara Schieck, Elizabeth Munoz, 
Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns 

Book fund : $3,751.82 ; Circ : 21,244 

Total vols : 8,842 ; New : 619 

Subs : Mags : 104 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 98 ; Stud : 2,443 ; Grades : 10-12 

GOLDEN GATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 220 Golden Gate Ave. Dr. 
Paul Kruse, Libn. 

Departmental libraries : School of Law 

Library 
See state and other four-year colleges 

table. 

GRIZZLY BEAR CLUB LIBRARY. 

414 Mason St. (Formerly Native Sons 
Library) 



HASTINGS COLLEGE OF 

LAW LIBRARY. (UNIVERSITY 

CALIFORNIA). 198 McAllister 

David L. Moore, Libn. 

Staff: 2 (non-prof.) ; Income: $13,035 

Circ: 29,763 

Total vols : 40,339 ; New : 1,899 

Subs: Mags: 108 

Not open to public 



THE 

r of! 

' St. |. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1962 



195 



HERBERT HOOVER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2290 14th Ave. 
Maryann Esteves, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1^ clerk 

Book fund : $3,010.69 ; Circ : 19,621 

Total vols : 7,586 ; New : 730 

Subs : Mags : 52 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,520 ; Grades : 7-9 

HORACE MANN JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3351 23cl St. Norma J. 
Rider, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,236.75 ; Circ : 14,620 

Total vols : 7,625 ; New : 709 

Subs : Mags : 49 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 53 ; Stud : 1,285 ; Grades : 7-9 

IIVIMACULATE CONCEPTION 
ACADEMY LIBRARY. 1212 Guerrero 
St., S. F. 10. 

INDUSTRIAL INDEMNITY CO. LI- 
BRARY. 155 Sansome St., S. F. 4. 
Mrs. Joan Hudson, Libn. 

INSURANCE UNDERWITERS AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 320 
California St., S. F. 4. 

INTERNATIONAL LONGSHORE- 
MEN'S AND WAREHOUSEMEN'S 
UNION LIBRARY. 604 Montgomery 
St., S. F. 11. 

JAMES DENMAN JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 241 Oneida St. 
Lynnea Berthelson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,947.17 ; Circ : 21,173 

Total vols : 8,724 ; New : 652 

Subs : Mags : 57 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,460 ; Grades : 7-9 

JAMES LICK JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1220 Noe St. Margaret 
Reimann, Libn, 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,459.12 ; Circ : 12,288 

Total vols : 5,475 ; New : 355 

Subs: Mags: 20; Newsp: 1 

Fac : 51 ; Stud : 1,102 ; Grades : 7-9 

JOHN A. O'CONNELL VOCATION- 
AL HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2905 
21st St. Helen B. Skrabak, Libn. 

; Staff : 1 libn ; * clerk 

I Book fund : $4,091.76 ; Circ : 3,775 
Total vols : 4,627 ; New : 524 
Subs : Mags : 225 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 38 ; Stud : 823 ; Grades : 10-12 

KATHERINE DELMAR BURKE 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3065 Jackson St. 
Anne Andreason, Libn. 

! Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $100 
■ Total vols : 3,200 ; New : 190 
I Subs : Mags : 7 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 20 ; Stud : 365 ; Grades : 7-12 



LANGLEY PORTER NEUROPSY- 

CHIATRIC INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 

401 Parnassus Ave., S. F. 22. Tel: OV 

1-8080, Ext. 329. Edwarda M. Adams, 

Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : To provide materials and as- 
sistance to our own staff, residents, 
and trainees as well as to Medical 
Center personnel and students in the 
fields of Psychiatry, Clinical Psy- 
chology, Neuropathology, Psychiatric 
Social Work, Nursing and Rehabili- 
tation Therapy 

Total vols : 5,122 ; Pams : 1,062 

New title : 350 ; VF drawers : 13 

Subs: Mags: 142; Newsp: 1 

Special collections : Psychiatry, Psycho- 
analysis, Clinical Ps.ychology, Neuro- 
pathology, Psychiatric Social Work, 
Nursing and Rehabilitation Therapy. 

Expenditures: $3,137; Circ: 9,010 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public (very limited) 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1860 Hayes St. Margueriete Grayson, 
Lois Barnett, Libns. 

Staff: 2 libns 

Book fund: $3,403.50; Circ: 17,622 

Total vols : 12,100 ; New : 594 

Subs : Mags : 73 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 79 ; Stud : 1,925 ; Grades : 9-12 

LUTHER BURBANK JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 325 La Grande 
Ave. John H. Nutley & Pauline Levie, 
Libns. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; ^ clerk 
Book fund : $1,868.24 ; Circ : 11,930 
Total vols : 6,950 ; New : 528 
Subs : Mags : 33 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 76 ; Stud : 1,680 ; Grades 7-9 

M. H. de YOUNG MUSEUM, ART 
REFERENCE LIBRARY. Golden 
Gate Park, S.F. 18. 

For reference only 

McCANN- ERICKSON, INC., LI- 
BRARY. 114 Sansome St., S.F. 4. 

McCUTCHEN, DOYLE, BROWN & 
ENERSEN LAW LIBRARY. Balfour 
BIdg., S.F. 4. Dorothy M. Andrews, 
Libn. 

MARINA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3500 Fillmore St. Madeline 
Fahs, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,822.09 ; Circ : 16,501 

Total vols : 13,750 ; New : 569 

Subs : Mags : 68 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 56 ; Stud : 1,170 ; Grades 7-9 



196 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN FRANCISCO-Continued 

MARY'S HELP COLLEGE OF 
NURSING LIBRARY. 145 Guerrero 
St., S.F. 3. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE LI- 
BRARY. 57 Post St., S.F. 4. Tel: GA 
1-1750. John C. Stump, Libn. 

Staff : 13 

Total vols : 160,135 
Subs : ^lags : 500 ; Newsp : 50 
Circ : 149,000 

Available to : Members only. 
Inteiiibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSUR- 
ANCE CO. LIBRARY. 600 Stockton 
St. Josephine Calloway, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose: To serve as : 1) reference and 
records center for Company staff; 2) 
recreational library for all employees. 

Total vols : 3,500 

New titles : 225 ; VF drawers : 20 

Subs : Mags : ISO ; Newsp : 6 

Special collections : life insurance, vital 
statistics and public health. 

Circ : 18,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing & abstracting ; cen- 
tralized procurement of publications 
and subscriptions. 

MISSION HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
18th St., corner of Dolores St. Kara S. 
Whitcher, Marilyn Bergen, Libns. 

Staff: 2 libns 

Book fund : $3,272.04 ; Circ : 15.146 

Total vols : 13,101 ; New : 580 

Subs : Mags : 73 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 108 ; Stud : 2,3.58 ; Grades 10-12 

MORRISON, FOERSTER, HOLLO- 
WAY, SHUMAN & CLARK LAW 
LIBRARY. 11th Floor Crocker BIdg., 
S.F. 4. Edith C. Nielsen, Libn. 
Staff : 1 

Total vols : 17,000 ; New : 452 
Subs : Mags : 80 

Serves : Private library for members of 
the law firm and their clients only. 
However, they do loan to other law 
libraries in the Bay Area upon request. 

NOTRE DAME DES VICTOIRES 
HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 659 Pine 
St., S.F. 8. 

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 347 Dolores St. Sister Lor- 
etta Joan, Libn. 

Staff : f teacher-libn 

Book fund : $550 

Total vols : 4,400 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 12 ; Stud : 200 ; Grades 9-12 



PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC COM- 
PANY LIBRARY. 245 Market St., 
S.F. 6. Tel: SU 1-4211, ext. 2738. Anne 
Burnett, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 other 

Purpose : To serve informational needs 
of company executives and employees. 

Total vols : 5,404 

New titles : 150 ; VF drawers : 53 

Subs : Mags : 360 

Special collections : Public utilities eco- 
nomics ; electric, gas, hydraulic, civil, 
mechanical engineering ; etc. 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing & abstracting. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 
LAW LIBRARY. 245 Market St. Noel 
M. Weaver, Libn. 

Staff : 2 

Total vols : 16,000 ; New : 410 

Subs : Mags : 42 

Not open to public. 

PACIFIC TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH CO. LIBRARY. 140 New 
Montgomery St., S.F. 5. 

THE PACIFIC-UNION CLUB LI- 
BRARY. 1000 California St., S.F. 8. 
Tel: PR 5-1233. Mrs. Rosa Nicol, Libn. 
Staff : 1 

Total vols : 20,500 
Available to : other libraries. 
Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

PAULIST LIBRARY. 614 Grant Ave., 
S.F. 8. Tel: DO 2-0959. Mrs. Mary P. 
Irwin, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 38 others 

Purpose : To provide Catholic research, 
reference and reading. 

Total vols : 10,000 

New titles : 600 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 12 

Special collections : Reference library — 
leading Catholic publications 

Expenditures : $1,600 ; Circ : 10,522 

Available to : Membership, other li- 
braries and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : to other Catholic li- 
braries on request. 

Services : Literature searching. 

PELTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 45 Conkling St. Robert E. 
Campbell & Terence Alberigi, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns. 

Book fund : $2,248.34 ; Circ : 14,730 

Total Vols : 4,478 ; New : 744 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 70 ; Stud. 1,600 ; Grades 7-9 

POLYTECHNIC HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 701 Frederick St. Marie Car- 
roll, Mary Foster, Libns. 

Staff : 2 libns ; 1 part-time 

Book fund: $3,731.10; Circ: 17,047 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



197 



Total vols : 12,136 ; New : 811 

Subs : Mags : 140 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 82 ; Stud. 1,753 ; Grades 10-12 

PORTOLA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 350 Girard St. Helen M. Van 
De Venter, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn. ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,849.82 ; Circ : 9,008 

Total vols : 10,718 ; New : 403 

Subs : Mags : 68 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 55 ; Stud. 1,264 ; Grades 7-9 

PRESENTATION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 281 Masonic Ave., S.F. 18. 

PRESIDIO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 450 30th Ave. Dorris E. 
Pratt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,671.03 ; Circ : 26,742 
Total vols : 11,197 ; New : 442 
Subs : Mags : 107 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 58 ; Stud. 1,368 ; Grades 7-9 

PRESS AND UNION LEAGUE CLUB 
LIBRARY. 555 Post St., S.F. 2. Fred- 
eric J. Southerland, Libn. 

RIORDAN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 175 Phelan Ave. Bro. Rich- 
lard Roesch, S.M., Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns. 
I Circ : 16,541 
j Total vols : 8,0-30 ; New : 863 

Subs : Mags : 140 ; Newsp : 5 
j Fac : 37 ; Stud. 900 ; Grades 9-12 

ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 460 Arguello Blvd. Helen 
iJ. McBride, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; i clerk 
iBook fund: $1,843.70; Circ: 17,410 

Total vols : 10,300 ; New : 354 
; Subs : Mags : 56 ; Newsp : 2 
[Fac: 51; Stud. 1,097; Grades 7-9 

ISACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1075 Ellis St. John E. 
IWaller, Libn. 

i Staff : 1 libn. ; i teacher-libn. 
Circ : 5,937 

Total vols : 4,963 ; New : 1,393 
Subs : Mags : 57 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 32 ; Stud. 800 ; Grades 9-12 

ST. ANDREWS SOCIETY LIBRARY. 

Native Sons' Hall, 414 Mason St., S.F. 
2. 

ST. IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
IBRARY. 222 Stanyan St. Bro. Leon- 
|ard Sullivan, S. J., Libn. 
, Book fund : $2,400 ; Circ : 5,500 

Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 350 
: Subs : Mags : 47 ; Newsp : 4 
jFac : 42 ; Stud. 1,040 ; Grades 9-12 

ST. JAMES BOYS SCHOOL Ll- 
JBRARY. 180 Fair Oaks St., S.F. 10. 

JST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL 
LIBRARY. 1580 Valencia St., S.F. 10. 



ST. MARY'S LIBRARIES. 2200 Hayes 
St., S.F. 17. Tel: SK 2-4000. Sister M. 
Joan, Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns. ; 2 volunteers 

Purpose : To meet the needs of the Med- 
ical Staff : professional reading and 
research ; to fill the need of any stud- 
ent group or graduate group ; to pro- 
vide patients with books of varied 
interest. 

Total vols": 17,000 ; Pams : 4-50 

New titles : 75 

Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Marian books, Hili- 
are Belloc, Californiana 

Expenditures : $3,000 ; Circ : 9,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re- 
quest. 

Services : Bibliographies ; recordings 
(tape or disc) . 

ST. PAUL'S HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 323 29th St., S.F. 14. 

ST. PETER'S ACADEMY LIBRARY. 
1245 Alabama St. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn. 
Book fund : $200 ; Circ : 2,000 
Total vols : 4,000 ; New : 50 
Subs : Mags : 12 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac: 6 ; Stud. 160; Grades 9-12 

ST. ROSE ACADEMY LIBRARY. 

2475 Pine St., S.F. 15. 

ST. VINCENT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1301 Geary. Sister Colette, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn. 
Book fund : $500 ; Circ : 9,499 
Total vols : 3,363 ; New : 200 
Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 12 ; Stud. 240 ; Grades 9-12 

SAN FRANCISCO ART INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY. 800 Chestnut St., Califor- 
nia School of Fine Arts. Richard Mil- 
ler, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE LIBRARY. 333 Pine St., 
S.F. 4. Mary J. L'Abbe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Total vols : 1,000 ; City directories : 350 ; 

Pams : 200 
Subs : Mags : 10 ; Newsp : 4 
Special collections : material on San 

Francisco. 
Expenditures : $30-50. 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral. 
Interlibrary loan : restricted. 
Services : City directories. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE LI- 
BRARY. 5th and Mission Sts., S.F. 19. 
Tel: GA 1-1111. Mrs. Thelma Percy, 
Libn. 



198 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN FRANCISCO-Continued 

San Francisco City College Library. 
See City College of San Francisco. 

SAN FRANCISCO COLLEGE FOR 
WOMEN LIBRARY. Lone Mountain. 
Mother K. Cassidy, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

SAN FRANCISCO EMPLOYERS 
COUNCIL, RESEARCH DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 114 Sansome St., S.F. 4. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC LIBRARY. 1201 Ortega 
Street. Joseph Biskind, M.A., Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 3100, Rincon An- 
nex, 3rd & Market Sts., S.F. 19. Larry 
Lieurance, Libn. 

StafE : 5 libns. ; 8 others 

Purpose : This a newspaper library and 
is not for the use of the general pub- 
lic .. . other than for telephone in- 
quiry . . . and then providing a quick 
answer with a minimum amount of 
research can be given. 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : restricted. 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW LIBRARY. 

436 City Hall, S.F. 2. Robert J. Ever- 

son, Libn. 

Staff : 14 ; Income : $122,190.90 

Total vols : 199,585 ; New : 3,371 

Subs : Mags : 466 

Open to public. 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1044 Post St. Amos Bech- 
tald, Libn. 

SAN FRANCISCO LIGHTHOUSE 
FOR THE BLIND. 745 Buchanan St., 
S.F. 2. Tel: HEmlock 1-1481. 

SAN FRANCISCO LODGE THEOS- 
OPHICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY. 414 
Mason. Agnes Kast, Libn. 

Staff : 5 

Purpose : To study and research, com- 
parative philosophies, sciences, reli- 
gions and occult laws in nature, aman 
and metaphysics. 

Total vols : 5,700 ; Pams : 5,987 

Subs : Mags : 8 

Special collections : rare books on phi- 
losophy science, religion, occultism, 
etc. 

Expenditures : mostly donations ; Circ : 
597 

Interlibrary loan : restricted. 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF 

ART LIBRARY. War Memorial, Civic 

Center, S.F. 2. Mrs. Anneliese Hoyer, 

Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn. 



Purpose : To serve as reference library 
on modern art for the Museum staff 
and the visiting public. 

Total vols : 3,200 

New titles : 50 ; VF drawers : 40 

Subs : Mags : 45 

Special collections : Foreign and domes- 
tic exhibition catalogs of art ma- 
terials. 

Expenditures : $500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 
and public by referral. 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

Services : Literature searching ; photo- 
stat copying ; film library. 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. Larkin & McAllister Sts. 
William R. Holman, Libn. 

Outlets : 25 branches, 13 bookmobile 
stops. 

SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1600 Holloway Ave. Ken- 
neth J. Brough, Libn. 
Branches : Downtown Center Library ; 

Frederic Burk Library (Campus 

School) 
See state and other four-year colleges 

table. 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY OR- 
CHESTRA MUSIC LIBRARY. War 
Memorial Opera House. 

SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED 
SCHOOL DISTRICT, TEACHERS 
PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. 135 Van 
Ness Ave. Geraldine Ferring, Supv. 
Edith B. Conkey, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

SARAH DIX HAMLIN SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2120 Broadway, S.F. 15. Mrs. 
Edna C. Longshore, Libn. 

SCOTTISH RITE OF FREE MA- 
SONRY LIBRARY. Scottish Rite i 
Temple, 1290 Sutter St., S.F. 9. 

SIERRA CLUB LIBRARY. 220 Bush i 
St., S.F. 4. Tel: YU 2-2822. 

SIMPSON BIBLE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 801 Silver Ave. Stuart Comp- 
ton, Libn. 

SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA PIO- 
NEERS LIBRARY. 456 McAllister 
St., S.F. 2. Mrs. Helen S. Giffen, Libn. 

Staff : 1 

Purpose : Research in Californiana. 

Total vols : 12,000 ; VF drawers : 42 

SOCIETY OF MAYFLOWER DE- 
SCENDANTS LIBRARY. 12 Geary "i 
St., S.F. 8. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC LIBRARY. 65 
Market St., S.F. 5. Tel: DO 2-1212, 
Ext. 2-2213. Mrs. Elsie M. Petterson, 
Libn. 



VOLUME ^'J, NO. I, WINTEE, 1 962 



199 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC GENERAL 
HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. 

1400 Fell St. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF 
CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. 225 Bush 
Street, S.F. 20. Tel: SU 1-7700, ext. 
2374. Mrs. Elizabeth B. Roth, Libn. 

Staff : 6 libns. ; 8 others 

Purpose : To provide an information 
and library service to executives, pro- 
fessional personnel, and other em- 
ployees of Standard Oil Company of 
California and subsidiaries. 

Total vols : 16,207 ; Pams : 29,256 

New titles : 1,512 ; VF drawers : 16 

Subs : Mags : 1070, Newsp : 16 

Special collections : Petroleum technol- 
ogy & geology ; business methods. 

Circ : 101,400 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral (refei'ence only) 

Interlibrary loan : limited to special re- 
quests. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying, briefing & 
abstracting ; centralized procurement 
of publications and subscriptions. 

STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
LIBRARY. 350 Bush St., S.F. 4. 

STATE DIVISION OF MINES AND 
GEOLOGY LIBRARY. Ferry Bldg., 
S.F. 1. William A. Sansburn, Libn. 
Tel: GA 1-8800. 

Total vols : 25,000 
Subs : Mags : 220 ; Newsp : 25 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 
RESEARCH LIBRARY. 810 David 
Hewes Bldg., 995 Market St., S.F. 3. 

SUPREME COURT OF CALIFOR- 
NIA LIBRARY. Rm. 407, State Bldg., 
S.F. 2. 

SUTRO LIBRARY, CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY. Golden Gate Ave. 

at Temescal. (Mailing address: 2130 

Fulton St., S.F. 17) Mrs. Carma R. 

Leigh, State Libn. Richard H. Dillon, 

Sutro Libn. 

Subjects : English history, U.S. local 
history and genealogy, voyages and 
travels, early science, rare books, 
Mexican history 

Special collections : Sir Joseph Banks 
manuscripts, 10,000 pieces ; English 
and Mexican pamphlets ; genealogy 
reference ; Renaissance and Reforma- 
tion books in Latin and German ; 
Hebrew manuscripts ; maps ; first edi- 
tions 



SWEDISH SOCIETY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO LIBRARY. 2174 Mar- 
ket St., S.F. 14. 

U.S. ARMY FORT MASON POST 
LIBRARY. Fort Mason. Mrs. Helen 
G. Hines, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : To provide progressive public 
library type service to all military, 
dependents, and civilian personnel of 
the military community 

Total vols : 5,199 ; Pams : 325 

New titles : 500 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 22 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Military science col- 
lection, including U.S. Army in World 
War II series 

Expenditures: $2,300; Circ: 30,444 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Bibliographies ; recordings 
(tape or disc) 

U.S. ARMY. LETTERMAN GEN- 
ERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL LI- 
BRARY. Presidio of San Francisco. 
Mary E. Caruso, Libn. Tel: JO 1-3124. 

Staff : 3 libns. 

Purpose : To give reference and biblio- 
graphic service to the staff for training^ 
treatment and research in medicine 

Total vols : 1,200 ; Pams : 400 

New titles : 588 ; VF drawers : 1 

Subs : Mags : 375 

Special collections : Medicine and allied 

SCIGIICGS 

Expenditures: $8,500; Circ: 12,828 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

U.S. ARMY. LETTERMAN ARMY 
HOSPITAL POST AND PATIENTS 
LIBRARY. Letterman Army Hospital, 
Presidio of San Francisco. Mrs. Agnes 
C. Campbell, Libn. 

U.S. ARMY. SIXTH U.S. ARMY LI- 
BRARY AND LIBRARY DEPOT. 
Bldg. M 13-14, Presidio of San Fran- 
cisco. Tel: JO rdan 1-3028. Wendell 
B. Coon, Sixth U.S. Army Libn., Mrs. 
Elizabeth Bock, Supv. Libn. 

FORT BAKER BRANCH LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Doris Enman, in 
charge. 

FORT WINFIELD SCOTT 

BRANCH LIBRARY. Barbara Jes- 
kalian, Ext. Services Libn. 

— PRESIDIO OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO POST LIBRARY. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Bock, Libn. 



8 — 54336 



200 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued 

U.S. ARMY, TRANSPORTATION 
CORPS, POST LIBRARY. BIdg. 111, 
Fort Mason. Helen G. Rodan, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn. 

Purpose : Serves as the informational, 
research, recreational reading and 
study center of the Fort Mason mili- 
tary installation. Furnishes free serv- 
ices to military personnel, dependents 
and civilian employees on the post 

Total vols : 5,200' ; Pams : 5,203 

New titles : 500 ; VF drawers : 2 

Subs : Mags : 33 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Military section in- 
cludes military history, U.S. History 
of WWII Series, Trials of War Crim- 
inals vols. I-XV 

Circ : 29,268 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Extended to Sixth 
Army libraries in the area, Oakland 
Army Terminal Post Library 

Services : Literature searching 

U.S. BUREAU OF MINES, SAN 
FRANCISCO PETROLEUM RE- 
SEARCH LABORATORY, Reg. II, 
1429 Appraisers BIdg., 630 Sansome St. 

U.S. CIRCUIT COURT OF AP- 
PEALS, NINTH CIRCUIT, LIBRARY. 
Room 310, Post Office BIdg., 7th and 
Mission Sts., S.F. 1. 

U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE, OF- 
FICE OF FIELD SERVICES LI- 
BRARY. 419 Custom House, 555 
Battery St., S.F. 11. Tel: YU 6-3111, 
Ext. 2176. Louise Candau, Libn. 

U.S. MARINE CORPS SUPPLY 
FORWARDING ANNEX, SPECIAL 
SERVICES LIBRARY. BIdg. 1, Rm. 
219, 100 Harrison St. 

U.S. NAVAL RADIOLOGICAL DE- 
FENSE LABORATORY. Tel: Ml 
8-6900, Ext. 343. Mrs. Edna R. Bow- 
man, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns. ; 4 others 

Purpose : To procure information and 
make it available to the technical 
staff of the laboratory 

Total vols : 16,600 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 380 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Nuclear sciences 
and atomic energy — particularly ef- 
fects of radiation 

Expenditures : $15,000 ; Circ : 19,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions 



U.S. NAVAL STATION LIBRARY. 
BIdg. 263, Treasure Island. Tel: EX 
2-3931, Ext. 2676. Elizabeth Guethlein, 
Libn. 

Staff : 3 

Purpose : Provides education, informa- 
tional, cultural and recreational serv- 
ices for the personnel at Treasure 
Island and for those in the 12th 
Naval District where no other library 
facilities are readily available 

Total vols : 15,000 ; Pams : 20O 

New titles : 1,900 

Subs : Mags : 73 ; Newsp : 3 

Special collections : Electronics 

Expenditures : $1,200 ; Circ : 25,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

U.S. NAVY TRAINING SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. San Francisco Naval Ship- 
yard, Hunter's Point, S.F. 24. 

U.S. PENITENTIARY LIBRARY. 
Alcatraz. Mr. H. M. Schalier, Libn. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL CEN- 
TER LIBRARY. 3rd and Parnassus. 
Mrs. Carmenina Tomassini, Libn. 

Staff : 11 libns ; 30 others 

Purpose : Serves primarily faculty, stu- 
dents and research personnel of the 
four professional schools (Medicine, 
Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing), 
staffs of two hospitals and medical 
and dental clinics and by coiirtesy to 
off-campus persons associated with 
the Health Sciences 

Total vols : 192,361 ; Pams : 1,273 

New titles : 10,000 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 2,785 ; Newsp : 4 

Special collections : History of Medicine 
and History of Science, Osleriana, 
Anesthesia, Medical Galiforniana, jf 
Historv of Oriental Medicine 

Circ : 96,542 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral only 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest ; rare books and archive mate- 
rials ; current periodicals and some 
bound periodicals of the last five 
years : Photocopies available at nom- 
inal cost 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photoduplication service ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions (for campus 
depts. only) 

UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

Richard A. Gleeson Library. Rev. Wil- 
liam J. Monihan, S.J., Libn. Depart- 
mental Libraries: (2) Physics and 
Chemistry. 

See state and other four-pear colleges 
taile. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



201 



UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. S.F. 
17. Elizabeth-Anne Quigley, Libn. 

Staff : 3 

Total vols : 27,763 ; New : 796 

Subs : Mags : 89 

Not open to public 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
HOSPITAL LIBRARY. 42nd Ave. and 
Clement Sts., S.F. 21. Tel: BA 1-4810, 
Ext. 291. 

MEDICAL LIBRARY. 42nd 



Ave. and Clement St., S.F. 21. Tel: 
BA 1-4810, Ext. 291. Eioise Ryan, 
Libn. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
REGIONAL OFFICE MEDICAL LI- 
BRARY. 49 Fourth St. Mrs. Alice E. 
Duffy, Libn. 

■; Staff: 1 

Purpose: Medical and related fields 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

WELLS FARGO BANK-AMERICAN 
TRUST COMPANY LIBRARY. 14 
iMontgomery St., S.F. 20. 

[WELLS FARGO BANK-AMERICAN 
ITRUST COMPANY, HISTORY 
!R00M. 30 Montgomery St. Irene 
iSimpson, Libn. Tel: EX 7-4411. 

;Staff: llibn; 1.5 others 

[Purpose : Reference collection and com- 
pany museum, open to the public 

'Total vols : 1,200 

Binders : 500 

Special collections : Photograph collec- 
tion of 8,000' prints on staging, pony 
express, San Francisco and Wells 
Fargo Agents and agencies 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

ilnterlibrary loan : Restricted 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 
CO., FREIGHT TRAFFIC DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. 526 Mission St., S.F, 5. 

WINE INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 717 
Market St., S.F. 3. Tel: YU 6-0878, 
Ext. 19. Eleanor Prindle, Libn. 

jPurpose : To collect, catalog and file 
vdne industry information, and to 
make this information available to 

1, members and others 

Total vols : 1,750 

Special collections : California Wine In- 
dustry photographs 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

, and public by referral 

ilnterlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; central- 

j ized procurement of publications and 

! subscriptions 

WOMEN'S CITY CLUB LIBRARY 
m Post St., S.F. 2. 



WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL LI- 
BRARY. 421 Powell St., S.F. 2. Tel: 
YU 2-2541. Mrs. Rosemarie F. Ben- 
ton, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : Adult education in world af- 
fairs 
Total vols : 7,900 ; Pams : 10,000 
New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 9 
Subs : Mags : 300 ; Newsp : 2 
Expenditures : $1,700 ; Circ : 3,000 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries, 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : Limited, to member- 
ship only 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

WORLD TRADE CENTER LI- 
BRARIES OF THE SAN FRAN- 
CISCO WORLD TRADE CENTER 
AUTHORITY. Ferry BIdg., S.F. 11. 
Tel: DO 2-0701. Mrs. Jeanne Nichols, 

I_ I hn 

Staff": 2 libns. 

Purpose : To provide current trade and 
economic information, both foreign 
and domestic, for the purpose of as- 
sisting in the development of Cali- 
fornia trade 

Total vols : 7,537 

New titles : 1,000 : 

Subs : Mags : 343 : 



40 



VF drawers ; 
Newsp : 40 

Special collections : Trade and telephone 
directories (foreign and domestic) ; 
foreign magazines. Feature trade and 
industry data ; shipping and port 
data ; economics — for all countries 

Expenditures : $1,000 ; Circ : 900 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and members of W. T. Club or tenant 
of center. 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying 



SAN GABRIEL (Los Angeles Co.) 

SAN GABRIEL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 801 Ramona St. (Mrs.) Ger- 
aldine R. Huck, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 

Book fund : $3,728 ; Circ : 31,642 

Total vols : 7,579 ; New : 1,093 

Subs : Mags : 96 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 82 ; Stud : 1,770 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAN GABRIEL MISSION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Santa Anita at 
Broadway. 



SAN JACINTO (Raves-ssde Co.) 

SAN JACINTO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Ruth Shepherd, Libn. 

Staff : i teacher-libn. 

Book refund : $.300 ; Circ : 5,720 

Total vols : 2,925 ; New : 105 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 22 ; Stud : 286 ; Grades : 9-12 



202 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN JACINTO-Continued 

SAN JACINTO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

220 Ramona Blvd. Mrs. Ruth H. 

Wedge, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Riverside Co. F. L. 



SAN JOSE (Santes Clara Co.) 

A. LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 555 Dana Ave. Mrs. Eleanor 
Collins, Libn. 
Staff: llibn. 

Total vols : 7.000 ; New : 398 
Subs : Mags : 107 ; Newsp : 2 
Stud : 1,200 ; Grades : 10-12 

AGNEWS STATE HOSPITAL, MED- 
ICAL LIBRARY. Tel: AM 2-2100, 
Ext. 3489. Mrs. Lucille Leuschner, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 2 others 

Purpose : To furnish staff members in 
the hospital with reading material for 
study and information pertaining to 
their profession to aid them in help- 
ing the patients 

Total vols : 2,500 ; Pams : 75 

New titles : 350 

Subs : Mags : 55 

Special collections : Psychiatry and re- 
lated subjects, psychology, psycho- 
therapy, social science, psychiatric 
nursing, etc. 

Expenditures : $2,500 ; Circ : 3,000 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

AGNEWS STATE HOSPITAL, REC- 
REATIONAL LIBRARY. Tel: AM 
2-2100, Ext. 3489. Mrs. Lucille Leusch- 
ner, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. 

Purpose : The library furnishes recrea- 
tional and educational reading mate- 
rials for all patients 

Total vols : 8,.500 ; Pams : 100 

New titles : 500 

Subs : Mags : 20 ; Newsp : 5 

Special collections : Bibliotherapv 

Expenditures : $800 ; Circ : 50,000 mags ; 
24,000 books 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; recordings (tape or disc) ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions 

ANDREW HILL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3200 Senter Rd. Mrs. Frances 
F. Perske, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn: * clerk 

Book fund : $3,500 ; Circ : 24,000 

Total vols : 4,1.50 ; New : 1.000 

Subs : Mags : 74 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 64 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 9-12 



BELLARMINE COLLEGE PREPAR- 
ATORY LIBRARY. Emory at Elm St. 
Bro. Thomas A. Marshall, S.J., Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Circ : 6.000 

Total vols : 10,477 ; New : 953 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac: 46; Stud: 860; Grades: 9-12 

CAMDEN HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Camden and Union Ave., San Jose 24. 
Muriel Carson, Libn. 

DEL MAR HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1224 Del Mar Ave. Robert Bruce 
Torgny, Libn. 

EAST SIDE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT LIBRARY. 57 N. White 
Rd. Mrs. Beauel M. Santa, Libn. 

EDISON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
275 Terra I ne. 

EDWIN MARKHAM JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2105 Cottle Ave. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., ATOMIC 
POWER EQUIPMENT DEPT. LI- 
BRARY. Tel: CY 7-3000, Ext. 2357. 
P. O. Box 254, 2151 S. First St. Alleen 
Thompson, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 4 others 
YF drawers : 200 
Subs : Mags : 4.50 ; Newsp : 7 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting ; 
centralized procurement of publica- 
tions and subscriptions 

HERBERT HOOVER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1471 Park Ave. 
Mrs. Winifred M. Samuels, Libn. 

IBM ADVANCED SYSTEMS DE- 
VELOPMENT AND RESEARCH LI- 
BRARY. Monterey and Cottle Rds. 
Tel: CY 7-2950. Marjorie Griffin, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns ; 4 others 
Total vols : 6,000 ; Pams : 20,000 
Subs : Mags : 572 ; Newsp : 12 
Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services: Bibliographies; photostat 
copying ; briefing and abstracting. 

JAMES LICK HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 57 N. White Rd. Gertrude D. 
Carlin, Libn. 

Book fund : $5,000 : Circ : 27,268 
Total vols : 9.022 ; New : 848 
Subs : Mags : 66 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 85 ; Stud : 1,789 ; Grades : 9-12 

JOHN iMUIR JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1260 Branham Lane. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



203 



MORELAND DISTRICT LIBRARY. 

4335 Payne Ave. Jean E. Wichers, 
Acting Dist. Libn. 

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 596 S. Second. Sister Marie 
Robert, Libn. 

PETER H. BURNETT JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 850 N. Second 
St.. San Jose 12. 

ROSICRUCIAN RESEARCH LI- 
BRARY. Rosicrucian Park. Te!: CY 

5-0323. Ruth Phelps, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 other 

Purpose : To serve as a research library 
both for local and worldwide mem- 
bership of the Rosicrucian Order, 
AMORC 

Total vols : 9,900 

New titles : 1,000 ; VF drawers ; 8 incl. 
pamphlets 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 1 

Special collections : Egyptology, psy- 
chology, parapsychology, philosophy, 
mysticism, Baconiana, Rosicrucian- 
ism 

Expenditures : $535 ; Circ : 400 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

SAN JOSE CITY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 2100 Moorpark Ave. Hubert 
E. Hall, Libn. 
See junior college libraries table. 

SAN JOSE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 275 N. 24th St., San Jose 27. 

SAN JOSE DEPT. OF LIBRARY 
AND TEXTBOOK SERVICES. 2130 
Los Gatos-Almaden Rd. Elise Smith, 
Supv. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN JOSE INSTRUCTIONAL MA- 
TERIALS DIVISION, 1605 Park Ave. 
Mary L. Zingheim, Supv. 
See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN JOSE MERCURY-HERALD 
NEWS LIBRARY. 211 W. Santa 
Clara St. 

SAN JOSE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Mar- 
ket and San Fernando Sts., San Jose 
13. Mrs. Geraldine L. Nurney, Libn. 
Outlets : 3 branches. 47 community and 
1 school bookmobile stops. 

SAN JOSE STATE COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 250 8. Fourth Street. Joyce 
Backus, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

SAN JOSE VOCATIONAL CENTER 
LIBRARY. 1991 Kingman, San Jose 
28. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 257 N. Market St. George F. 
Farrier, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Gilroy, 
Los Gatos, Mt. View, Palo Alto, San 
Jose, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale. 

Outlets : 220 

Branches : Central, Campbell, Cuper- 
tino, Los Altos, Saratoga 

Stations : Alum Rock, Burbank, Mil- 
pitas, Morgan Hill, Mt. Hamilton, 
Union, Wrights 

Bookmobile stops : 86 

Schools : 127 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY HOS- 
PITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY. San 
Jose- Los Gatos Rd. Tel: CY 3-0262, 
ext. 255. Mrs. Edna N. Graun, Libn. 

Staff: 1 libn 

Purpose : Reading and reference library 
for membership of Santa Clara 
County Medical Society and staff and 
personnel of Santa Clara County 
Hospital 

Total vols : 3,707 ; Pams : 300 

New titles : 216 ; VF drawers : 1 

Subs : Mags : 165 ; Newsp : 2 

Special collections : Tumor and nursing 
library 

Expenditures : $3,500 ; Circ : 4,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. Room 242, Hail of Records. 
Albert C. Wagner, Libn. 

Staff : 2 ; Income : $24..312 
Total vols : 14,155 ; New : 280 
Subs : Mags : 10 
Serves : Open to the public 

SANTA CLARA CO. TEACHERS 
LIBRARY. O. S. Hubbard, Co. Supt. 
Included in Co. F.L. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT JR. 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 901 E. 

Santa Clara. Mrs. Islay Stephen, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $700 

Total vols : 11.000 ; New : 237 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 48 ; Stud : 1,000 ; Grades : 7-9 

WILLOW GLEN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2001 Cottle. Norma Hage, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $1.600 ; Circ : 8,936 
Total vols : 6,051 ; New : 429 
Subs : Mags : 57 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 61 ; Stud : 1,2.58 ; Grades : 10-12 

WOODROW WILSON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Grant and Vine 
St., San Jose 10. 



204 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



SAN JUAN BAUTISTA (San Benito Co.) 

SAN JUAN BAUTISTA CITY LI- 
BRARY. Masonic Building, Second 
St. Mrs. Clara Zanetta, Libn. 
Affiliated with : San Benito Co. F.L. 



SAN JUAN CAPSSTRANO (Orange Co.) 

CAPISTRANO UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. Charles H. 

Lauer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,200 

Total vols : 5,075 ; New : 262 

Subs : Mags : 22 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 32 ; Stud : 535 ; Grades : 8-12 



SAN LEANDRO (Alameda Co.) 

BANCROFT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1150 Bancroft St. 

JOHN MUIR JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1444 Williams St. Mrs. 
May Lathrop, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,500 

Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 42 ; Stud : 810 ; Grades : 7-9 

SAN LEANDRO COMMUNITY LI- 
BRARY CENTER. 300 Estudillo Ave. 
Stephen D. Ewing, Libn. 
Contracts with : City of Oakland (Re- 
ciprocal Service Agreement) ; Ala- 
meda Co. F.L. for bookmobile service. 
Outlets : 3 stations, 2 bookmobile stops 

SAN LEANDRO ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL LIBRARY SERVICES. 451 
W. Joaquin Ave. Mrs. Anna Mary 
Lowrey, Libn. 

SAN LEANDRO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2200 Bancroft. Sandra Ra- 
mois, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,452.72 
Total vols : 6,782 ; New : 867 
Subs : Mags : 116 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 74 ; Stud : 1,570 ; Grades : 10-12 



SAN LORENZO (Alameda Co.) 

ARROYO HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
15701 Lorenzo Ave. John B. Dooley, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,500 ; Circ : 21,000 

Total vols : 8,500 ; New : 900 

Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 100 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAN LORENZO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 725 Leweliing Blvd. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

CALIFORNIA MEN'S COLONY LI- 
BRARY. Box W, Los Padres. Mr. 
T. R. White, Libn. 

Purpose : To provide library facilities 
for inmates and staff of California 
state prison. 

Subs : Mags : 38 ; Newsp : 8 

Expenditures : $4,500 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

See also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 

CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECH- 
NIC COLLEGE LIBRARY. Francis S. 
Allen, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY FREE 
LIBRARY. 1354 Bishop St. Mrs. Lois 
King Crumb, Libn. 

Serves : entire county except San Luis 
Obispo City and Paso Robles. 

Outlets: 20 

Stations : Arroyo Grande, Atascadero, 
Cambria, Cayucos, Creston, Grover 
City, Halcyon, Morro Bay, Nipomo, 
Oceano, Pismo Beach, Pozo, San 
Miguel, Santa Margarita, Shandon, 
Shell Beach, Simmler, South Bay, 
Templeton. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY LAW 
LIBRARY. Room 305, Courthouse. 
Mrs. Frances J. Reynolds, Libn. 

Staff 1 ; Income : $6,962.69 

Circ ■ 254 

Total vols : 8,845 ; New : 275 

Subs : Mags : 7 

Open to public for reference only 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. SCHOOLS, 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 
CENTER. 2156 Sierra Way. Mrs. 
Muriei Patterson, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. TEACHERS 
LIBRARY. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Dorothy 

Coleman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Circ : 11.385 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 491 

Subs : Mags : 44 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 43 ; Stud : 982 ; Grades : 7-9 

SAN LUIS OBISPO PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 888 Morro St. Patricia I. 
Clark, Libn. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO SR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. Mrs. Elinor C. 

Smith, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 14,582 

Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 663 

Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 47 ; Stud : 820 ; Grades : 10-12 



VOLUME ^'], NO. I, WINTER, 1962 



205 



SAN LUIS REY (San Diego Co.) 

SAN LUIS REY COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Rev. Berard Weishaar, 
O.F.M., Libn. 

(See state and other- four-year colleges 
table. 



SAN MAi^COS (San Diego Co.) 

PALOMAR COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Esther W. Nesbin, Libn. 

*S'ee junior college libraries table. 

SAN MARINO (Los AngeSes Co.) 

HENRY E. HUNTINGTON LI- 
BRARY AND ART GALLERY LI- 
BRARY. 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino 
9. Robert O. Dougan, Libn. 

SAN MARINO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2701 Huntington Drive. Ai- 
leen D. Montgomery, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,(X)0 

Total vols : 6,600 ; New : 1,206 

Subs : Mags : 92 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 64 ; Stud : 1,200 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAN MARINO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
1890 Huntington Dr. June E. Bayiess, 
Libn. 

Outlets : 2 branches, 1 station 

SAN MATEO (San Mateo Co.) 

COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO LI- 
BRARY. Coyote Point Campus. Mrs. 
Mary L. Faught, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

HILLSDALE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 31st and Del Monte. 

SAN MATEO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Belivue and Delaware. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $6,000 

Total vols : 18,342 ; New : 968 

Subs : Mags : 135 ; Newsp : 7 

Fac : 79 ; Stud : 1,466 ; Grades : 10-12 

SAN MATEO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

129 Second Ave. Mrs. Pauline H. 

Coleman, Libn. 

Contracts with : San Mateo Co. F. L. 

Branches : 2 

Stations : 1 

SAN MATEO SCHOOL DIST. AND 
AUDIO-VISUAL CENTER. 300 W. 
28th Ave. Mrs. Frances Erickson, 
Supv. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SERRA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

451 W. 20th Ave. John L. Zoph, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $975.98 ; Circ : 1,680 

Total vols : 9,308 ; New : 207 

Subs : Mags : 66 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 34 ; Stud : 920 ; Grades : 9-12 



SAN PABLO (Contra Costa Co.) 

Helms Jr. High School Library, see 
Richmond. 

CONTRA COSTA COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 2801 Castro Rd. Charles C. 
Smith, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 



SAN PEDRO (Los Angeles Co.) 

SAN PEDRO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1001 W. 15th, San Pedro 
(Los Angeles city schools) Selma 
Haytema, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,366.65 

Total vols. 7,873 ; New : 747 

Subs : Mags : 115 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 82 ; Stud : 1,841 ; Grades : 10-12 

U.S. ARMY. FORT MacARTHUR LI- 
BRARY SYSTEM. Bidg. 84, Fort 
MacArthur. Tel: TE 2-4571, Ext. 6351. 
Helen E. Burgess, Libn. 
Staff : 2 libns ; 3 others 
Purpose : To provide progressive public 
library type service to all military, 
dependents, and civilian personnel of 
the military community 
Total vols : 12,995 ; Pams : 3,329 
New titles : 1,117 ; VF drawers : 8 
Subs : Mags : 93 ; Newsp : 15 
Special collections : Militarv affairs 
Expenditures : $5,243 ; Circ : 92,176 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; recordings (tape or disc); 
children's reading program ; bookmo- 
bile service to NIKE sites 



SAN QUENTIN (Mae-in Co.) 

CALIFORNIA STATE PRISON-SAN 
QUENTIN LIBRARY. Tel: GL 4- 
1460, Ext. 55. Herman K. Spector, 
Libn. 

Purpose : To assist in the general train- 
ing and welfare of the prison popula- 
tion leading toward educational, vo- 
cational, cultural, and personal ad- 
justment and advancement. 

Subs : Mags : 111 ; Newsp : 19 

Special collections : Professional litera- 
ture for in-service training for entire 
institutional staff, especially crimino- 
logical, penologv. 

Expenditures : $i0,400 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

See also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 



206 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

SAN RAFAEL (Marin Co.) SA^!@SR (fs-esno Co.) 



DAVIDSON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Woodland and Lindero. 
Charles J. Freeman, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $800 ; Circ : 18,000 

Total vols : 3,800 ; New : 300 

Subs : MaKs : 27 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 23 ; Stud : 550 ; Grades : 7-9 

DOMINICAN COLLEGE OF SAN 
RAFAEL LIBRARY. Sister Mary 
Marguerite, Libn. Departmental li- 
brary: Music 

See state and other four-year colleges 
tahle. 

DOMINICAN UPPER SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1520 Grand Ave. Sister M. 
Dolores, O.P., Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn. ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,100 ; Circ : 3,650 
Total vols : 3,635 ; New : 335 
Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac: 41; Stud: 109 (extended day, 
119) ; Grades : 9-12 

MARIN CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 675 Sir Francis Drake 
Blvd. Mrs. Zoe G. Bintley, Libn. 

MARIN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 

1711 Grand Ave. Mrs. Virginia V. 

Keating, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Mill Val- 
ley, San Rafael, San Anselmo, and 
Sausalito. Larkspur by special agree- 
ment. 

Outlets : 113 

Branches : Novato 

Stations: Belvedere -Tiburon, Bolinas, 
Corte Madera, Fairfax, Inverness, 
Kentfield, Forest Knolls, Marin City, 
Pt. Reyes Station, Stinson Beach, 
Tamalpais, Toraales, Woodacre. Sum- 
mer Camp Stations : Girl Scouts, 
Bluebirds, Campfire Girls, Homestead, 
4H, San Quentin (children only) and 
crippled adults 

Bookmobile stops : 20 community and 
18 school 

Schools : 53 

MARIN CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

MARIN CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Courthouse. 

SAN RAFAEL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1212 Linden Lane. 

SAN RAFAEL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
1100 E St. Mrs. Vivian R. Smith, Libn. 

TAMALPAIS SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1675 Grand Ave. 



SANGER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Date and West. Mrs. Eu- 
nice Farschon, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn. 

Book fund : $1,428 ; Circ : 3,693 

Total vols : 3,271 ; New : 188 

Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 54 ; Stud : 988 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAMTA AHA (OrenBige Co.) 

GARDEN GROVE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL DISTRICT LIBRARY. 1421 
N. La Bonita. Mrs. Arline Schiller, 
Libn. 

JULIA C. LATHROP JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1120 S. Main St. 

MATER DEI HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1202 W. Edinger. 

ORANGE CO. LAW LIBRARY. 623 
N. Broadway. Stella Groff, Helen 
Cramer and Robert A. Whitson, Libns. 

ORANGE CO. TEACHERS' LI- 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 

RALPH C. SMEDLEY JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2120 W. Edinger 
St. Marge Chaloupka, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 20,112 

Total vols : 4,700 ; New : 498 

Subs : Mags : 63 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 83 ; Stud : 2,250 ; Grades : 7-9 

SANTA ANA CITY SCHOOLS CEN- 
TRAL LIBRARY. 1415 French St. 
Mrs. Doris E. Regnier, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries tahle. 

SANTA ANA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
1530 W. 17th St. Ruth Bradley, Libn. 

See junior college libraries tahle. 

SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY.5Q2 
W. 8th St. Howard Samuelson, Libn. 

Outlets : 2 stations, 14 elementary school 
stations, 1 branch 

SANTA ANA SR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 520 W. Walnut St. 

TUSTIN UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1171 Laguna Rd. 

U.S. MARINE CORPS AIR STATION 
LIBRARY. El Toro. Tel: LI 4-1230, 
ext. 1304. Jean Ruth Miller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 2 others 

Purpose : To serve the military person- 
nel in matters relating to the mission 
of the base and the needs of the in- 
dividuals in fulfilling their primary 
duties as well as off-duty interest. 
Dependents are also provided for. 



VOLUME '>,'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



207 



Total vols : 30,000 ; Pams : 2,500 

New titles : 2,050 ; VF drawers : 6 

Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 13 

Special collections : Military art and 
science, aviation, guided missiles, U.S. 
Marine Corps, U.S. Navy 

Expenditures: $3,000 books; $700 pe- 
riodicals ; Circ : 31,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies 

WILLARD JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1342 N. Ross. Mrs. Shirley 
Ryan, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 
Total vols : 4,-500 ; New : 450 
Subs : Mags : 30 
Fac : 45 ; Stud : 1,300 ; Grades : 7-9 



SANTA BARBARA (SctnJ^ Barbara Co.) 

CATHOLIC LIBRARY AND INFOR- 
MATION CENTER. 

Bee Our Lady of Light Library. 

FRANCISCAN FATHERS' THEO- 
LOGICAL LIBRARY. Upper Laguna. 
Rev. Virgilio Biasiol, O.F.M., Libn. 

Staff : S libns. 

Purpose : Primarily for use of the stu- 
dents. For reference work and other- 
wise 

Total vols : 41.333 ; Pams : 3,000 

New titles : 600 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 3 

Expenditures : $3,500 ; Circ : 4,000 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

LA CUMBRE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Rt. 1, Box 394, Modoc Rd. 

LOS PRIETOS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Star Route. Richard J. At- 
kinson, Libn. 

MARYMOUNT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2130 Mission Ridge Rd. 

OLD MISSION LIBRARY. Old Mis- 
sion. Tel: 3153. Rev. Robert B. Pfis- 
terer, Libn. 

OUR LADY OF LIGHT LIBRARY. 
1611 Anacapa. Mrs. Sallie G. May, 
Libn. 

Staff : 2 libns. ; 20 others 

Purpose : To make readily available ma- 
terials dealing with the fields of spir- 
ituality, philosophy, biography, church 
history, travel and good family fiction 

Total vols : 6,000 

Subs : Mags : 12 ; Newsp : 1 

Expenditures : 500 ; Circ : 10,000 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 



SANTA BARBARA CITY COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 721 Cliff Dr. Mrs. Ruth A. 
Little, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FREE 
LIBRARY. 40 E. Anapamu St. John 
E. Smith, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Contracts with : Santa Barbara Public 
Library for service 

Affiliated with : Lompoc P.L. and 
Santa Maria P.L. 

Outlets : 27 

Stations : Buellton, Carpinteria, Cu- 
yama, Goleta, Guadalupe, Hospital 
Cottage, Hospital General, Los Ala- 
mos, Los Olivos, Montecito, Orcutt, 
Santa Tnez, Solvang, Sumnierland 

Bookmobile stops : 10 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY LAW 
LIBRARY. County Courthouse. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Coen, Libn. 
Staff : 1 ; Income : $14,000 
Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 300 
Serves : Open to public 

SANTA BARBARA CO. MEDICAL 
SOCIETY LIBRARY. 300 N. Pueblo. 
Tel: WO 6-7393. Mrs. Elizabeth Perry, 

l_ i hn 

staff": 1 libn. ; 2 others 

Purpose : To serve doctors, nurses and 
hospitals 

Subs : Mags : 200 ; Newsp : 6 

Expenditures : $1,500 ; Circ : 3,640 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting; recordings (tape or 
disc) ; centralized procurement of pub- 
lications and subscriptions 

SANTA BARBARA JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 721 E. Cota St. 

Dora F. Sager, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; i clerk 

Total vols : 9,725 ; New : 365 

Subs : Mags : 36 > Newsp : 3 

Fac : 49 ; Grades : 7-9 

SANTA BARBARA MEDICAL 
CLINIC LIBRARY. 1421 State St. 

SANTA BARBARA HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 700 E. Anapamu. Mrs. 
Olma B. Bowman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,300 ; Circ : 16,709 

Total vols : 7,995 ; New : 825 

Subs : Mags : 103 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 85 ; Stud : 1,554 ; Grades : 10-12 

SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF 
NATURAL HISTORY LIBRARY. 
2559 Puesta Del Sol. Clifton F. Smith, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 



208 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES 



SANTA BARBARA-Continued 

Purpose : To provide reference data on 
all phases of natural history 

Total vols : 7,500 ; Pams : 1,000 

VF drawers : 15 

Subs : Mags : 100 

Special collections : Anthropology, or- 
nithology, etc. 

Expenditures : $500 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; briefing and abstracting 

SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS 
LIBRARY. 

SANTA BARBARA PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 40 E. Anapamu St. John E. 
Smith, Libn. 

Distriimting agencies listed under Santa 
Barbara County Free Library. 

SANTA BARBARA SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 700 E. Anapamu. 

WESTMONT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
955 La Paz Rd. John E. Kephart, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



SANTA CLARA (Santa Clara Co.] 

EMIL R. BUCHSER HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 3000 Benton St. Mrs. Mar- 
neli Hillman, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn. ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $7,500 ; Circ : 20,000 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 2,500 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 80 ; Stud : 1,700 ; Grades : 9-12 

JEFFERSON UNION ELEM. IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CEN- 
TER. 1201 Lawrence Rd. Patricia 
Koepernik, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SANTA CLARA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
City Plaza, Main and Lexington Sts. 
Frances M. Klune, Libn. 

Bookmobile stops : 23 community, 13 
school stops 

SANTA CLARA UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 551 Bellomy St. 

UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA 
LIBRARY. Rev. Edward R. Boland, 
S.J,, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



SCHOOL OF LAW LIBRARY. 



James L. Biawie, Libn. 
Staff : 8 ; Income : $43,660 
Total vols : 30,941 ; New : 3,056 
Subs : Mags : 113 
Open to public 



SANTA CRUZ (Santa Cruz Co.) 

BRANCIFORTE JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. Popluar St. Aimee J. 

Hinds, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $845 ; Circ : 12,417 

Total vols : 6,747 ; New : 413 

Subs : Mags : 61 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 596 ; Grades : 7-9 

MISSION HILL JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 425 King St. Mildred A. 
Hunkin, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $600 ; Circ : 10,947 

Total vols : 6,763 ; New : 196 

Subs: Mag: 16 

Fac : 29 ; Stud : 632 ; Grades : 7-9 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 224 Church St. Mrs. Ger- 
aldine G. Work, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Watson- 
ville 

Contracts with : Santa Cruz Public Li- 
brary for service 

Outlets : 30 

Stations: City: East Side, Garfield 
Park, Seabright ; County : Alba, Aptos, 
Ben Lomond, Boulder Creek, Capitola, 
Corralitos, Davenport, Felton, Free- 
dom, La Selva, Scotts Valley, Soquel, 
Twin Lakes 

Schools : 13 

SANTA CRUZ CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. Tom Kelly, Libn. 

SANTA CRUZ CO. SCHOOLS, PRO- 
FESSIONAL LIBRARY. 105 Soquel 
Ave. Mrs. Honor O'Connor, Libn. 

SANTA CRUZ CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse Annex. 

SANTA CRUZ HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Walnut and California. Mrs. 
Ruth W. Carmean, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; li clerks 

Book fund : $2,197.40 

Total vols : 6,995 ; New : 543 

Subs : :Mags : 134 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 85 ; Stud : 1,775 ; Grades : 9-12 

SANTA CRUZ PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
224 Church St. Mrs. Geraldine G. 
Work, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Watsou- 

ville 
Contracts with : Santa Cruz Co. F. L. 

for service 
Outlets : See Santa Cruz Co. F. L. 

SANTA FE SPR8NGS (Los Angeles Co.) 

SANTA FE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1040O Orr and Day. Bobbie 
Miyano, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Circ : 28,187 

Total vols : 7,900 ; New : 1,341 

Subs : Mags : 58 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 98 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



209 



SANTA FE SPRINGS CITY LI- 
BRARY. 11700 Telegraph Rd. Oscar 
W. J. Smaalders, Libn. 



SANTA MARSA (Sasita Bsis-bssr'ia €0.) 

ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. South Airport Ave. Mrs. 
Marjorie Bailey, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

SANTA MARIA ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 321 N. Thorn- 
burg. Mrs. Grace Elam, Supv. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SANTA MARIA JT. UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 901 S. Broad- 
way. Ida Minkle, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,400 ; Circ : 29,966 
Total vols : 11,015 ; New : 583 
Subs : Mags : 172 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 104 ; Stud : 2,260 ; Grades : 9-12 

SANTA MARIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
420 S. Broadway. Mrs. Dorothea D. 
Nelson, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Santa Barbara Co. 
F. L. 



SANTA MONICA (Los Angeles Co.) 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1501 California. 

Mrs. Sylvia Hoffmayer, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,750 ; Circ : 24,704 

Total vols : 8,215 ; New : 623 

Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,457 ; Grades : 7-9 

DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT CO. INC., 
LIBRARY. 3000 Ocean Park Blvd. 

JOHN ADAMS JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 16th and Pearl. Mrs. Le- 
nore C. Eberle, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : 2,100 ; Circ : 13,956 

Total vols : 8,500 ; New : 741 

Subs : Mags : 26 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 7-9 

KYSER MEDICAL LIBRARY, SAINT 

JOHN'S HOSPITAL. 1328 22nd St. 

Mrs. Janet C. White, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Purpose : Geared toward the clinical, 
for medical staff 

Total vols : 1,200 

New titles : 100-150 

Subs : Mags : 130 ; Newsp : 3 

Expenditures: $3,000; Circ: 9,540 

Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



THE RAND CORPORATION LI- 
BRARY. 1700 Main Street. Margaret 

R. Anderson, Libn. 

Staff: 11 libns ; 20.5 others 

Purpose : To provide information for 
the extensive program of research and 
original investigation in the physical 
sciences, economics, mathematics and 
the social sciences being conducted by 
The RAND Corporation 

Total vols : 20,000 ; Pams : 140,000 

New titles : 3,385 

Subs : Mags : 1,474 ; Newsp : 35 

Special collections : Space law ; Rus- 
sian politics, economics, science and 
technology ; weapon systems and 
space technology ; military history, in 
addition to subjects mentioned in pur- 
pose listed above 

Circ : 95,500 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; recordings ; central- 
ized procurement of publications and 
subscriptions ; provide microprint 
readers 

SANTA MONICA BRANCH, LOS 
ANGELES COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. 2d Floor, L.A. County Build- 
in.g, 1725 Main St. 

SANTA MONICA CITY COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1815 Pearl St. F. W. 
Breen, Libn. 
See junior college libraries table. 

SANTA MONICA HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 601 Pico Blvd. Margaret 
Jackson, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2* clerks 

Book fund : $3.7"35 ; Circ : 43,426 

Total vols : 23,287 ; New : 964 

Subs : Mags : 1,30 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 130 ; Stud : 2,750 ; Grades : 10-12 

SANTA MONICA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

503 Santa Monica Blvd. Hilda Giaser, 

Libn. 

Outlets : 2 branches, 1 station 

SANTA MONICA UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DIST., INSTRUCTIONAL MATERI- 
ALS CENTER. 1723 Fourth St. Chase 
Dane, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SANTA PAULA (Ventura Co.) 

DEAN HOBBS BLANCHARD ME- 
MORIAL LIBRARY. 737 Main St. 
Mrs. Irene Folsetter, Libn. 

SANTA PAULA UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 404 N. Sixth. 
Shirley E. Moore, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 16,252 

Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 928 

Subs : Mags : 115 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 56 ; Stud : 1,150 ; Grades : 9-12 



210 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES 



SANTA ROSA (Sonoma Co.) 

COOK JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2170 Sebastopol Road. 

HERBERT SLATER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3500 Sonoma 
Ave. H. Stroud, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libu ; i clerk- 
Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 20,000 
Total vols : 4,500 ; New : 600 
Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 46 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 7-9 

MONTGOMERY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1250 Hahman Dr. Mrs. 
Martha Datson, Libn. 

NORTH BAY COOPERATIVE LI- 
BRARY SYSTEM. Santa Rosa Public 
Library, 207 Exchange Ave. David 
Sabsay, Coordinating Libn. 

SANTA ROSA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1235 Mendocino Ave. Donald 
E. Crockett, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libu ; U clerks 

Book fuud : $1,000 ; Circ : 15,500 

Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 250 

Subs : Mags : 52 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 10-12 

SANTA ROSA JR. COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Avis Stopple, Libn. De- 
partmental libraries: California His- 
tory Room and Engineering Library. 

See junior college libraries table. 

SANTA ROSA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. College and King. 

SANTA ROSA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
207 Exchange Ave. David Sabsay, 
Libn. 

Outlets : 1 station 

SONOMA COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 2555 Mendocino Ave. Fran- 
ces G. Murphy, Libn. 
Serves : Entire county except Clover- 
dale, Healdsburg, Petaluma, Santa 
Rosa, Sebastopol, and Sonoma. 
Contracts with : Cloverdale, Healds- 
burg, Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Sebas- 
topol and Sonoma for limited ex- 
change of services. 
Outlets : 42 

Stations : Anapolis, Boyes Hot Springs, 
Cazadero, Cotati, Forestville, Franz 
Valley, Geyserville, Glen Ellen, Gra- 
ton, Guerneville, Kruse Ranch, Monte 
Rio, Occidental, Windsor. 
Bookmobile stops : 21 

SONOMA COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. Mrs. Gladys Miller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 ; Income : $6,007 
Total vols : 11,677 ; New : 232 
Subs : Mags : 3 
Open to public 



SONOMA CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 

2555 Mendocino Ave. Joseph L. Leger, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SONOMA CO. SCHOOLS, TEACH- 
ERS PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY. 
2555 Mendocino Ave. Joseph L. Leger, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

URSULINE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 90 Mark West Springs Rd. 
Mother M. Dorothea McCormack, 
O.S.U., Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $650 ; Circ : 5,225 
Total vols: 10,000; New: 288 books 

and 70 paperbacks 
Subs : Mags : 33 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 20 ; Stud : 300 ; Grades : 9-12 

SANTA YNEZ (Santa Barbara Co.) 

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Joanne Watson, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $2,000 

Subs : Mags : 28 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 26 ; Stud : 465 ; Grades : 9-12 

SARATOGA (Santa C!ara Co.) 

SARATOGA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Herriman Ave. Ruth Slagle, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fuud : $5,200 

Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 1,400 

Subs. Mags. 55 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 26 ; Stud : 530 ; Grades : 9-12 

SAUSALITO (Marin Co.) 

SAUSALITO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 733 
Bridgeway St. Mrs. Josephine Ripley, 
Libn. 

SEAL BEACH (Orange Co.] 

SEAL BEACH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. Bolsa and Bay Blvd. Mrs. 
Delitha E. Kimball, Libn. 

SEBASTOPOL (Sonoma Co.) 

ANALY UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 154 Analy Ave. 

SEBASTOPOL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
7140 Bodega Ave. Mrs. Maybelle W. 
Long, Libn. 
Contracts with : Sonoma Co. F.L. 

SELMA (Fresno Co.) 

SELMA UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2446 N. McCall. Marrily A. 
Cutler, Libn. 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



211 



SEFULVEDA (Los AngeSes Co.) 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 

HOSPITAL LIBRARY. Mrs. Eleanor 

L. Johnson, Libn. 

Staff : 3 libns 

Purpose : Medical Library- — provides 
material for both research and train- 
ing procedures for the staff of this 
Neuropsychiatric and General, Medi- 
cal, and Surgical hospital for Vet- 
erans. General Library — provides ma- 
terial for patients and staff of an in- 
formative, educational, and recrea- 
tional type. 

Total vols : Medical — 1,725 ; General — 
8,500 

VF drawers : Medical — 8 ; General — 6 

Subs : Mags : 65 

Special collections : Neurology, psychi- 
atry, psychology, nursing 

Expenditures: $3,100; Circ: Medical — 
4,551 ; General— 21,479 

Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries 

Interlibrary loan : Limited to special 
requests 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 



SHAFTER (Kern Co.) 

SHAFTER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Theodora Richard, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; \ clerk 
Book fund : $2,030 ; Cfrc : 42,300 
Total vols : 5,525 ; New : 640 
Subs : Mags : 110 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 48 ; Grades : 9-12 



SHANDON (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

SHANDON JR. UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box 66. 



Total vols : 2,545 

New titles : 120 

Expenditures : $100 ; Circ : 1,244 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 



SOLEDAD (MontCE-ey Co.) 

CALIFORNIA STATE CORREC- 
TIONAL TRAINING FACILITY LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 686. John Raffile, 
Libn. 

Purpose : Provide recreational reading 
vocational information, educational 
guidance for inmates 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 8 

Special collections : Staff library fea- 
tures materials on group counseling, 
penology 

Expenditures : $5,000 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Bibliographies ; briefing and 
abstracting 

Bee also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 

CALIFORNIA STATE CORREC- 
TIONAL TRAINING FACILITY, 
NORTH LIBRARY. P.O. Box 2530. 
Glenn Emberson, Libn. 
Purpose : Reference library and recrea- 
tional books for inmates of the insti- 
tution 
Subs : Mags : 65 ; Newsp : 7 
Expenditures : $2,300 
See also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 



SONOMA (Sonoma Co.) 

SONOMA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 453 
First St., E. Addie M. Sherman, Libn. 
Contracts with : Sonoma Co. F.L. 

SONOMA VALLEY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Broadway. 



SIERRA MADRE (Los Arageles Co.) 

SIERRA MADRE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 440 W. Sierra Madre Blvd. 
Mrs. Josephine Terry, Libn, 



SIGNAL HILL (Los Angeies Co.) 

SIGNAL HILL PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
2175 Cherry Ave. Kathleen Brady, 
Libn. 

SIMS (Ves^tucsM Co.) 

SIMI VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3150 School St. 



SiVllTH REVER (Del Norte Co.) 

SMITH RIVER LIBRARY. Mrs. Flor- 
ede H. Owen, Libn. 

Purpose : To supply current reading 
material to local population 



SONORA (Tuolumne Co.) 

SONORA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 92 N. 
Washington. Mae R. Kelly, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Tuolumne Co. F. L. 

SONORA UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 430 N. Washington. Mrs. 
Ethel Kinzly, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn part-time 
Book fund : $950 ; Circ : 5,135 
Subs : Mags : 39 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 36 ; Stud : 70S ; Grades : 9-12 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 9 N. Washington St. Mrs. 
Diane Hooe, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Affiliated with : Sonora Public Library 

Outlets : 23 

Branches : Big Oak Flat, Columbia, 
Groveland, Jamestown, Long Barn, 
Moccasin, Standard, Tuolumne, Twain 
Harte 

Schools : 14 



212 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIPOBNIA LIBRARIES 



SONORA— Continued 

TUOLUMNE CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

TUOLUMNE CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 

SOUTH PASADENA (Los Angeles Co.) 

SOUTH PASADENA JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1524 Fair Oaks 
Ave. 

SOUTH PASADENA HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 1401 Fremont Ave. Helen 
Reese, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 6,108 

Total vols : 7,391 ; New : 350 

Subs : Mags : 71 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 36 ; Stud : 780 ; Grades : 10-12 

SOUTH PASADENA PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 1115 El Centro St. Mrs. 
Mary E. Murdoch, Libn. 
Contracts with : Alhambra, Los Angeles 
Public Libraries 

STANFORD RESEARCH INSTI- 
TUTE LIBRARY. 820 Mission St. 

SOUTH SAN FRANC9SCO 

(San Meiteo Co.) 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO FREE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 440 Grand Ave. 
Lauretta Hussar, Libn. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 400 B St. Mrs. 
Liilion D. Anderton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 
Book fund : $8,000 
Total vols : 5,685 ; New : 1,050 
Subs : Mags : 75 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac : 85 ; Stud : 2,000 

UNITED AIR LINES TRAINING 
CENTER LIBRARY. Mills Field, Box 
3000. 

SPRING VALLEY (San Diego Co.) 

GROSSMONT COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
3230 Sweetwater Springs Blvd. T. A. 
Hepp, Libn. 

MT. MIGUEL HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 18005 Sweetwater Rd. Mrs. 
J. Rambatt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; i- clerk 

Book fund : $9,000 

Total vols : 5,000 

Subs : Mags : 107 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 96 ; Stud : 2,600 ; Grades : 9-12 



SPRING VALLEY JR. 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 3900 
Drive. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Circ : 31,265 

Total vols : 8,430 ; New : 1,782 

Subs : Mags : 86 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 54 ; Grades : 7-9 



HIGH 

Conrad 



SPRINGVILLE (Tulare Co.) 

G. J. MARTIN MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Tulare-Kings Counties 
Hospital. Mrs. Annabelle Dismuke, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : Books donated ; Circ : 1,500 
Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 100 
Fac: 6; Stud: 100; Grades 1-14 and 
adult school 



STANF03ID (Santa Clara Co.) 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY LI- 
BRARY. Raynard C. Swank, Dir. of 
Libs. 

Branch and Departmental Libraries : 
26, of which major ones are Branner 
Geological Library, Chemistry Li- 
bz'ary, Cubberley Education Library, 
Engineering Library, Falconer Bi- 
ology Library, Lane Medical Library, 
Music Library, Physics-Mathematics- 
Statistics Library. 
Special collections : Hopkins Transpor- 
tation Library, Memorial Library of 
Music, Albert M. Bender Typographi- 
cal Collection, Edward DeWitt Tay- 
lor Typographical Collection, Gunst 
Memorial Collection (French illus- 
trated books and signed binding of 
20th century), Charlotte Ashley Fel- 
ton Memorial Library (19th and 20th 
century British and American litera- 
ture). Sir Isaac Newton Collection, 
Elmer E. Robinson Collection (Amer- 
ican history), Greenland Collection, 
Borel Manuscript Collection, Bernard 
DeVoto Papers. 
See universities table. 

FOOD RESEARCH INSTI 



TUTE LIBRARY. Gazelle E. Janzen, 
Libn. 

HOOVER INSTITUTION ON 



WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE. 
Philip T. McLean, Libn. 

JACKSON LIBRARY OF 



BUSINESS. Marion M. Smith, Dir 

LAW LIBRARY. John H. 

Merryman, Libn. 

Staff : 11 

Circ : 40,591 

Total vols : 110.000 ; New : 5,407 

Subs : Mags : 630 

Not open to public 



STOCKTON (Scjsi Joaquin Co.) 

AMOS ALONZO STAGG SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1621 Brookside 
Rd. Chrysta Richards, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; f clerk 

Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 25,164 

Total vols : 11,995 ; New : 1,742 

Subs : Mags : 100 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 98 ; Stud : 2,285 ; Grades : 10-12 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



213 



COLLEGE OF THE PACIFIC LI- 
BRARY. 

Bee Universitj/ of the Pacific Library. 

DANIEL WEBSTER JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 2725 Michigan 
Ave. 

EDISON SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1425 S. Center St. Thomas 
DeWitt, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,000 ; Circ : 16,988 

Total vols : 8,793 ; New : 377 

Subs : Maa-s : 62 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,303 ; Grades : 10-12 

FRANKLIN SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 300 N. Gertrude St. Elsie 
Foster, Libn. 

Staif : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 17,854 

Total vols : 8,254 ; New : 822 

Subs : Ma^s : 56 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 56 ; Stud : 1,255 ; Grades : 10-12 

FREMONT JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2021 E. Flora. Esther L. 
Lipsey, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 
Book fund : $2,920 ; Circ : 15,269 
New : 774 

Subs : Mags : 80 ; Newsp : 1 
Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades 7-9 

HUMPHREYS COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
108 N. California St., Stockton 2. 

See California junior college libraries 
table. 

JOHN JVIARSHALL JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1601 Lever Blvd. 
Celesta Meier, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i time 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 19,937 

Total vols : 7,000 ; New : 880 

Subs : Mags : 86 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 68 ; Stud : 1,458 ; Grades : 7-9 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. Address: Public Library of 
Stockton and San Joaquin County, 
Hunter and Market Sts., Stockton 2. 
Margaret Klausner, Libn. 
Serves : Entire county except Lodi. 
Contracts with: Lodi (informal agree- 
ment) ; Stockton for service 
Outlets : 112 
Branches : Fair Oaks 
Stations : Clements, County Jail — Men 
and Women, Dameron Hospital, Es- 
calon, Honor Farm — Men, Lathrop, 
Linden, Mary Graham Hall, Manteca, 
Nile Garden, North Branch, Peterson 
Hall, Ripon, San Joaquin Co. Hos- 
pital-Wards, San Joaquin Co. School 
Nursing. State Hospital, Summer 
Camps, Thornton. Tracy. 
Bookmobile stops : 68 
Schools : 55 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY LAW LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. Mrs. Irene A. 
McCall, Libn. 
Staff : 1 ; Income : $17,000 
Circ : 1,197 

Total vols : 12,683 ; New : 256 
Subs : Mags : 15 
Open to public, limited circulation 

SAN JOAQUIN CO. SCHOOLS, IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CEN- 
TER. 336 E. Market. John F. Bahn- 
sen, Libn. 
See centralised school libraries table. 

SAN JOAQUIN CO. SCHOOLS, 
TEACHERS' PROFESSIONAL LI- 
BRARY. 336 E. Market. Mrs. Raychel 
Taggart, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

SAN JOAQUIN PIONEER MUSEUM 
AND HAGGIN ART GALLERIES 
LIBRARY. Victory Park, Pershing 
Ave., Stockton 3. 

SCHNEIDER VOCATIONAL HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1144 E. Channel 
St. Stockton 5, Mrs. Margaret P. 
Moore, Libn. 

STOCKTON COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
3301 Kensington Way. Allan R. Laur- 
sen, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

STOCKTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 351 E. Vine, Stockton 3. 

STOCKTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Ad- 
dress: Public Library of Stockton and 
San Joaquin County, Hunter and 
Market Sts., Stockton 2. Margaret 
Klausner, Libn. 

Distributing agencies listed under San 
Joaquin County Free Library. 

STOCKTON RECORD NEWS- 
PAPER LIBRARY. 530 E. Market St. 
Mrs. Ann E. Sausedo, Libn. 

STOCKTON STATE HOSPITAL LI- 
BRARY. 501 E. Magnolia St. 

STOCKTON UNIFIED ELEMEN- 
TARY SCHOOL DISTRICT LI- 
BRARY. 701 N. Madison St. 

U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, 
DELTA DISTRICT LIBRARY. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC LI- 
BRARY. Pacific Ave. and Stadium 
Dr. Arthur Swann, Libn. 
Departmental Libraries : (4) Pharmacy- 
Chemistry Library, Music Library, 
Curriculum Library, and Pacific Ma- 
rine Station Library. 
See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 



214 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



STRATHMORi (Tulare Co.) 

STRATHMORE UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. P.O. Box 37. Ro- 
land Rorvig, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libu ; 1 teacher-Iibn ; 5 clerks 
Book fund : $1,000 ; New : 300 
Subs : Mags : 25 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 15 ; Stud : 260 ; Grades : 9-12 

STUDiO CITY (Los Angeles Co.) 

CORVALLIS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 3925 Laurel Canyon Blvd. 



SUN VALLEY (Los Angeles Co.) 

JOHN H. FRANCIS POLYTECHNIC 

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 12431 

Roscoe Blvd. Virginia Baygulow, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,302.53 ; Circ : 15,182 

Total vols : 9,990 ; New : 459 

Subs : Mags : 143 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 117 ; Stud : 2,800 ; Grades : 10-12 



SUNLAND (Los Angeles Co.) 

MT. GLEASON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 10965 Mt. Gleason Ave. 
Mrs. L. Stong, Libn. 

State : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $1,645.25 ; Circ : 19,726 

Total vols : 6,368 ; New : 1,485 

Subs : Mags : 107 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 72 ; Stud : 1,554 ; Grades : 7-9 



SUNNYVALE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Duane and Britton. Mrs. 
Cecily Kyes, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,000 ; Circ : 17,561 

Total vols : 5,300 ; New : 976 

Subs : Mags : 78 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 78 ; Stud : 1,700 ; Grades : 9-12 

SUNNYVALE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
665 W. Olive Ave. Colin R. Lucas, 

Libn. 

SOSANVILLE (Lassen Co.) 

LASSEN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Courthouse Annex. John J. Lund, 
Libn. 

Serves : Entire county 

Outlets : 32 

Stations : Bieber, Herlong, Janesville, 
Litchfield, Madeline, Milford, Raven- 
dale, Riverside, Standish, Wendel, 
Westwood. 

Schools: 20 

LASSEN CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. Beryl B. Clawson, Libn. 

LASSEN CO. TEACHERS LIBRARY. 
Included in Co. F.L. 

LASSEN HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
1110 Main St., Romilda G. Puccinelli, 
Libn. 

LASSEN JR. COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

1110 Main St. Romilda Puccinelli, 
Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 



SUNNYMEAD (Rives-side Co.) 

ALESSANDRO JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 24551 Dracaea. Mrs. Helen 
Guiney, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; ^ clerk 
Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 7,500 
Total vols : 1,900 ; New : 296 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 28 ; Stud : 620 ; Grades : 7-9 



SUTTER CITY (Sutter Co.) 

SUTTER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 

SUTTER CREEK (Amador Co.) 

AMADOR COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Box 218 



SUNNYVALE (Santa Clara Co.) 

CUPERTINO HIGH SCHOOL LI- 

BRARY. P.O. Box 125. Mr. Emil Ra- 

nallo, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $8,000 ; Circ : 33,296 

Total vols : 5,550 ; New : 1,812 

Subs : Mags : 67 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 79 ; Stud : 1,800 ; Grades : 9-12 

FREMONT HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 215. Mrs. Barbara 
M. Johnston, Libn. 

SUNNYVALE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 656 E. Maude 
Ave. Gertrude Stacy, Libn. 

See centralised school libraries table. 



SYLMAR (Los Angeles Co.) 

Olive Vista Jr. High School Library, 
see under San Fernando. 

TAFI (Kern Co.) 

TAFT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
810 N. Sixth St. Mrs. Irma Cook, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

TAFT COLLEGE LIBRARY. Enn- 
mons Park Dr. Mrs. Elizabeth Hill, 
Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

TAFT UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 709 Philippine St. 



VOLUME '^•J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



215 



TALMADGE (Mendocino Co.) 

MENDOCINO STATE HOSPITAL, 
MEDICAL LIBRARY. Dorothy Fran- 
cis, Libn. 



TEHACHAPI (Kern Co.) 

TEHACHAPI HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 126 South Snyder. Mrs. 
Alpha Styles, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 

Total vols : 942 ; New : 120 
Subs : Mags : 27 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 24 ; Stud : 290 ; Grades : 9-12 



TEMPLE CITY (Los Angeles Co.) 

TEMPLE CITY HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9501 E. Lemon. 

TEMPLE CITY UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 6623 N. Oak Ave. Mrs. 
Gwendolyn Clark, Supv. Mrs. Wilma 
Vogt, Libn. 

/See centralized school libraries taile. 



TEMPLETON (San Luis Obispo Co.) 

TEMPLETON HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 218. Zena Rodni, Libn. 

Staff: 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : 

New : 50 

Subs : Mags : 12 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 11 ; Stud : 128 ; Grades 7-12 

TERMINAL ISLAND 

See under Los Angeles. 



TOLLHOUSE (Fresno Co.) 

SIERRA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

LeRoy A. Berg, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $3,000 ; Circ : 9,800 

Total vols : 9,000 ; New : 800 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 28 ; Stud : 450 ; Grades : 9-12 



TOMALES (Marin Co.) 

TOMALES JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box B. Annie 
Rook, Libn. 



TORRANCE (Los Angeles Co.) 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY HARBOR 
GENERAL HOSPITAL, MEDICAL 
LIBRARY. 1124 W. Carson St. Mrs. 
Alice W. Lundy, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 

Purpose : To maintain a collection of 
medical books and journals and to 
serve the medical and nursing staffs 
of this hospital 

Total vols : 1,928 ; Pams : 100 

New titles : 200 ; VF drawers : 3 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 2 

9—54336 



Expenditures : $2,000 ; Circ : 4,490 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 
and public by referral 

NORTH HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
3620 W. 182d. Charlotte C. Jennett, 
Libn. 

STEPHEN M. WHITE JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 22102 S. Fig- 
ueroa. Marilyn Marckwardt, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; ^ clerk 

Book fund : $3,799.73 

Total vols : 5,268 ; New : 999 

Subs : Mags : 159 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 100 ; Stud : 2,530 ; Grades : 7-9 

TORRANCE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2200 Carson. Mrs. Ruth G. 
Pearson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Circ : 19,025 

Total vols : 7,530 ; New : 2,325 
Subs : Mags : 101 ; Newsp : 4 
Fac : 63 ; Stud : 1,200 ; Grades : 9-12 



TORRANCE 
1345 Post St. 

Affiliated with ; 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Los Angeles Co. P.L. 



TORRANCE UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT, EDUCATIONAL MATE- 
RIALS BLDG. 2335 Plaza del Amo. 
Roderick D. McDaniel, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



TRACY (San Joaquin Co.) 

DEUEL VOCATIONAL INSTITU- 
TION LIBRARY. P.O. Box 400. Mar- 
vin R. Koster, Acting libn 

Purpose : To provide recreational read- 
ing as well as reference materials for 
academic and vocational subjects 

Subs : Mags : 22 

Expenditures : $1,500 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : Restricted 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; centralized procurement of 
publications and subscriptions 

See also state prison and correctional 
school libraries table. 

TRACY JT. UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. William H. Davies, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 10,800 
Total vols : 8,000 ; New : 350 
Subs : Mags : 82 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac: 55; Stud; 1,200; extended day: 
80 ; Grades : 9-12 



TRANQUILLITY (Fresno Co.) 

TRANQUILLITY UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. James J. Mar- 
tin, Libn. 
Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,300 ; Circ : 8,810 
Total vols : 5,200 ; New : 650 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 28 ; Stud : 410 ; Grades : 9-12 



216 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



TRONA (San Bernardino Co.) 

TRONA JR.-SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. County Road. Mrs. Alene 
Blackmun, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Total vols : 3,028 ; New : 154 
Subs : Mags : 78 ; Newsp : 3 
Grades : 7-12 



TRUCKEE (Nevada Co.) 

TAHOE-TRUCKEE COMMUNITY 
CENTER LIBRARY. Emigrant Way. 
Roy D. Baker, Teach-Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

TAHOE-TRUCKEE UNIFIED 

SCHOOL DISTRICT. Roy D. Baker, 

Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Total vols : 8,062 ; New : 747 

Subs : Mags : 37 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 22 ; Stud : 365 



TUJUNGA (Los Angeles Co.) 

Verdugo Hills High School Library, see 
Los Angeles. 



TULARE (Tulare Co.) 

TULARE CITY ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 600 N. Cherry 
Ave. 

TULARE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Kern 
and I Sts. Elizabeth La Cell, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Tulare Co. F.L. 

TULARE UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 755 E. Tulare St. 

TULARE WESTERN HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 728 W. Maple St., Mrs. 
Ann Steelman, Libn. 



TULELAKE (Siskiyou Co.) 

TULELAKE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Louise Thompson, 
Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 
Book fund : $3,000 
Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 800 
Subs : Mags : 12 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 12 ; Stud : 175 ; Grades : 9-12 



TUOLUMNE (Tuolumne Co.) 

SUMMERVILLE UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box H. R. Liu- 

derfeit, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Book fund : $1,250 

Total vols : 2,500 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 4 

Grades : 9-12 



TURLOCK (Stanislaus Co.) 

STANISLAUS STATE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1000. R. Dean 
Galloway, Libn. 

TURLOCK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 250 
N. Broadway. Paul F. Thompson, 
Libn. 

Affiliated with : Stanislaus Co. F.L. 

TURLOCK UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. Mrs. Harriet R. Lee, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1200 ; Circ : 27,173 
Total vols : 12,260 ; New : 808 
Subs : Mags : 138 ; Newsp : 6 
Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,371 ; Grades : 9-12 



TUSTEN (Orange Co.) 

TUSTIN UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1171 Laguna Rd. Virginia 
Kirkham, Libn. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $7,500 

Total vols : 6,500 ; New : 1,300 

Subs : Mags : 91 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 57 ; Stud : 1,393 ; Grades : 9-12 



TWENTYNINE PALMS 
(San Bernardino Co.) 

TWENTYNINE PALMS HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Box 804, Utah 
Trail. J. Donald Chiappeto, Libn. 



UKIAH (Mendocino Co.) 

MENDOCINO COUNTY LIBRARY 
DEMONSTRATION. 108 W. Clay St. 
Miss M. Virginia Hughes, Project Di- 
rector. 

MENDOCINO CO. SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. Courthouse. Sandra Spencer, 
Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



MENDOCINO CO. TEACHERS 
BRARY. Courthouse. 






UKIAH HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

Dr. Robert E. Sondergard, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $5,600 ; Circ : 35,000 

Total vols : 6,000 ; New : 1,200 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 52 ; Stud : 1,400 ; Grades : 9-12 

UKIAH PUBLIC LIBRARY. 320 S. 
State St. Mrs. Frieda Winter, Libn. 



UNION CITY (Alameda Co.) 

JAMES LOGAN HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1800 H Street. Betty D. 
Nantt, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn 
Book fund : $10,000 



I 



"Volume 57, no. t, winter, 1962 



211 



Total vols : 5,600 ; New : 3,800 

Subs : Mags : 69 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 1,600 ; Grades : 9-12 



UNIVERSAL CITY (Los Angeles Co.) 

UNIVERSAL PICTURES CO., INC., 
RESEARCH DEPT. LIBRARY. 



UPLAND (Sen Bernardino Co.) 

UPLAND COLLEGE LIBRARY. 792 
W. Arrow Highway. Miriam A. Bow- 
ers, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
taile. 

UPLAND HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
565 W. 11th St. Gladys Naftel, Libn. 

UPLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 123 E. 
D St. Mrs. Louise Franke, Libn. 



UPPER LAKE (Lake Co.) 

UPPER LAKE LIBRARY DISTRICT 
LIBRARY. Harriet Lee Hammond 
Memorial BIdg. Box 85 



VACAVILLE (Solano Co.) 

CALIFORNIA MEDICAL FACILITY 
LIBRARY. Box 2000. Tel: HI 8-6481, 
Ext. 585. Mrs. Martha J. May, Libn, 

Purpose : To provide adequate reading 
material for inmates and research ma- 
terial for staff 

Subs : Mags : 181 ; Newsp : 2 

Expenditures : $4,700 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : All libraries on re- 
quest 

Services : Literature searching ; record- 
ings (tape or disc) 

See also state prison and correctional 
school litraries table. 

VACAVILLE HIGH SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT LIBRARY. Main St., P.O. Box 
636. Mrs. Esther Eldredge, Libn. 

Affiliated with : Solano Co. F.L. 



VALLEJO (Solano Co.) 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 501 Starr Ave. 
Mrs. Lavada H. Bovey, Libn, 

CALIFORNIA MARITIME ACAD- 
jEMY LIBRARY. P.O. Box 1392. 
David A. Hunter, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
\ tahle. 

HOGAN JR. HIGH SCHOOL Ll- 
[BRARY. 850 Rosewood. Dorothy E. 
fMarsden, Libn. 
iStaffrllibn; 1 clerk 
iTotal vols : 7,000 

Subs : Mags : 47 ; Newsp : 3 
tFac : 51 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 7-9 



MARIANO GUADALUPE VALLEJO 
JR. HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 1347 
Amador St. Lloyd A. Scanlon, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,747.47 ; Circ : 9,992 

Total vols : 8,446 ; New : 587 

Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 51 ; Stud : 1,183 ; Grades : 7-9 

VALLEJO JR. COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
Whitney at Mini Dr. Alene M. Parker, 
Libn. 

See junior college lihraries tahle. 



HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
Amador. Lloyd A. 



VALLEJO JR. 
BRARY. 1347 
Scanlon, Libn. 

VALLEJO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 244 
Virginia St., P.O. Box 272. Agnes M. 
Walsh, Libn. 

Outlets : 4 stations 

VALLEJO SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 840 Nebraska. Mrs. Elinor 
Reisn, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $4,000 ; Circ : 19,000 
Total vols : 10,000 ; New : 500 
Subs : Mags : 50 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 106 ; Stud : 2,300 ; Grades : 10-12 



VAN NUYS (Los Angeles Co.) 

CARNATION RESEARCH LABORA- 
TORIES LIBRARY. 8015 Van Nuys 
Blvd. 

LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT CORP., 
MISSILES AND SPACE DIVISION. 
7701 Woodley Ave. Andrew S. Glick, 
Libn. 

LOS ANGELES VALLEY COLLEGE 
LIBRARY, 5800 Fulton Ave. Mrs. 
June A. Biermann, Libn. 
See junior college libraries table. 

ROBERT FULTON JR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 7477 Kester Ave. 
Jane Cavette, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; ^ clerk 

Book fund : $3;200.16 ; Circ : 26,304 

Total vols : 7,661 ; New : 1,334 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 73 ; Stud : 1,708 ; Grades : 7-9 

« 

VAN NUYS JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 5435 Vesper Ave. Robert 
Halcomb, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,900 ; Circ : 35,000 

Total vols : 11,500 ; New : 480 

Subs : Mags : 72 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 70 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 7-9 

VAN NUYS SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 6535 Cedros. Aline C. Mi- 
chael, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; I clerk 

Book fund : $3,682.59 ; Circ : 15,000 

Total vols : 14,220 ; New : 1,240 

Subs : Mags : 204 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 107 ; Stud : 2,550 ; Grades : 10-12 



218 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



VENICE (Los Angeles Co.) 

See under Los Angeles 

VENTURA (Ventura Co.) 

ANACAPA JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 100 South Mills Road. Al- 
len D, Fowler, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 25,322 
Total vols : 6,950 ; New : 426 
Subs : Mags : 46 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 42 ; Stud : 915 ; Grades : 7-9 

CABRILLO JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1426 E. Santa Clara St. Gi- 
sela M. Farber, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,050 ; Circ : 20,285 

Total vols : 6,821 ; New : 175 

Subs : Mags : 62 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 49 ; Stud : 1,050 ; Grades : 7-9 

DE ANZA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2060 Cameron. Mrs. Shizue 
Tan, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Total vols : 5,000 ; New : 3,922 
Subs : Mags : 40 ; Newsp : 2 
Fac : 41 ; Stud : 750 ; Grades : 7-9 

VENTURA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

4667 Telegraph Rd. Grant W. Heil, 

Libn. 

Departmental Libraries : Agriculture, 

and Electi'onics classroom library. 
iS'ee junior college libraries taile. 

VENTURA COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 651 E. Main St. Mrs. Cath- 
erine S. Chadwick, Libn. 
Serves : entire county Oxnard and 

Santa Paula. 
Affiliated with : Ventura Public Library 
Outlets : 138 

Stations : Avenue, Camarillo, Casitas, 
East Ventura, Fillmore, Matilija, 
Moorpark, Oak View, Ojai, Piru, 
Port Hueneme, Saticoy, Saticoy 
Church, Simi, Somis, Thousand Oaks. 
Bookmobile stops : 64 
Schools : 84 

VENTURA CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

VENTURA CO. TEACHERS Ll- 
BJ?ARY. Included in Co. F.L. 

VENTURA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 651 
E. Main St., P.p. Box 771. Mrs. Cath- 
erine S. Chadwick, Libn. 
Affiliated with : Ventura Co. P. L. 

VENTURA SR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 2155 E. Main St., Ventura. 
Eloise R. McConnell, Libn. 

VERNON (Los Angeles Co.) 

VERNON CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
4305 Santa Fe Ave. G. G. Skalsky, 
Deputy City Clerk in charge. 



VETERANS HOME (Napa Co.) 

VETERANS HOME LIBRARY. Tel: 
BA 6-5571. Virginia M. Hanrahan, 

l_ I hn 

Staff": 1 libn ; 5 others 

Purpose : Recreational for patients at 

the Home 
Total vols : 29,751 ; Pams : 1,747 
New titles : 1,085 ; VF drawers : 15 
Subs : Mags : 60 ; Newsp : 33 
Special collections : Spanish-American 

War Books, clippings, etc. (reference 

use only) military and American wars 
Expenditures : $2,400 ; Circ : 158,157 
Available to : Co. staff, other libraries 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : all libraries on re^ 

quest 



VICTORVILLE (San Bernardino Co.) 

U.S. GEORGE AIR FORCE BASE LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Frances Haysley, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 3 others 

Purpose : To provide technical, military, 
educational, and recreational material 
for military, their dependents, and 
civil service emplovees 

Total vols : 13,000 ; New titles : 1,300 

Subs : Mags : 150 ; Newsp : 6 

Special collections : Military science and 
military history 

Expenditures : $3,.300 ; Circ : 29,062 

Available to : Co. staff 

Interlibrary loan : restricted 

Services : Bibliographies ; centralized 
procurement of publications and sub- 
scriptions 

VICTOR VALLEY SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 6th and Mojave 
Drive. Beulah Dillenbeck, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 19,308 

Total vols : 5,109 ; New : 433 

Subs : Mags : 31 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 42 ; Stud : 950 ; Grades : 10-14 



V3SALIA (Tulare Co.) 

COLLEGE OF THE SEQUOIAS LI- 
BRARY. Mooney Blvd. Mrs. Genevieve 
Raphael and Miss Maureen Thorpe, 
Libns. 

See junior college libraries table. 

MT. WHITNEY HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 900 S. Conyer. Mrs. Vi- 
vian W. Gates, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table 

MT. WHITNEY HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 900 South Conyer. Vivian 

W. Gates, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,600 

Total vols : 10,600 ; New : 500 

Subs : Mags : 105 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 68 ; Stud : 1,375 ; Grades : 9-12 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



219 



REDWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1001 W. Main. Mrs. Marga- 
ret E. Barton, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 10,500 

Total vols : 5,223 ; New : 400 

Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 5 

Fac : 66 ; Stud : 1,250 ; Grades : 9-12 

TULARE COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Courthouse Room 10. Mrs. Hilda L. 
Collins, Libn. 

Serves : entire county 

Affiliated with : Porterville P. L., Tulare 
P. L. and Visalia P. L. 

Outlets : 93 

Stations : Agric. Office, Alpaugh R.R., 
Boys Camp, Detention Home, D. A. 
Offi^ce, Dinuba, Ducor, Earlimart, Ex- 
eter, Farmersville, Farm Advisor, 
Four H Club, Giant Forest, Girl 
Scouts, Grant Grove, Home Makers 
Camp, Ivanhoe, Johnsondale, Lindsay, 
Orosi, Pixley, Planning Commission, 
Panorama Heights, Public Defender, 
Sequoia Home, Sheriff's Office, Spring- 
ville, Strathmore, Surveyor's Office, 
Terra Bella, Three Rivers, Tipton, 
Tulare-Kings Hospital, Tulare Co. 
Hospital, Tulare Co. Museum, Tulare 
Co. Welfare Dept., Tulare Co. Health 
J Dept., Woodlake, Woodville, Wood- 
ville Farm Camp 

Bookmobile stops : 48 

TULARE COUNTY LAW LIBRARY. 
County Civic Center, Room 305. Mrs. 
Josephine Dougherty, Libn. 

Staff : 1 J ; Income : $12,194.09 
Total vols : 12,251 ; New : 286 
Subs : Mags : 4 
Open to public 

TULARE CO. SCHOOLS LIBRARY. 
Courthouse, Room 1. Mrs. Helen D. 
Robins, Director. 

\ See centralized school libraries table 

VISALIA ELEMENTARY CENTRAL 
LIBRARY. 200 S. Dollner. Carolyn 
Pendery, Dir. 

See centralized school libraries tahle 

VISALIA COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

See College of the Sequoias library. 

VISALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 200 W. 
Oak St. Mrs. Phoebe M. Winkler, 
Libn. 

Affiliated with : Tulare Co. F.L. 



VISTA (San Diego Co.) 

VISTA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
100 Escondido Ave. 



WALNUT (Los Angeles Co.) 

MT. SAN ANTONIO COLLEGE LI- 
BRARY. 1100 N. San Jose Hills Rd. 
Harriett Genung, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 



WALNUT CREEK (Contra Costa Co.) 

DEL VALLE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1963 Tice Valley Rd. Keith 
Harker, Libn. 

LAS LOMAS HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1460 S. Main. Mrs. Margaret 
Boubel, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,000 ; Circ : 36,000 

Total vols : 11,000 ; New : 1,500 

Subs : Mags : 90 ; Newsp : 7 

Fac : 65 ; Stud : 1,275 ; Grades : 9-12 



WASCO (Kern Co.) 

WASCO UNION HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 7th St., Leona Forster, Libn. 
Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $1,500 ; Circ : 14,148 
Total vols : 5,802 ; New : 300 
Subs : Mags : 45 ; Newsp : 5 
Fac : 40 ; Stud : 700 ; Grades : 9-12 



WATSONVILLE (Santa Cruz Co.) 

CABRILLO COLLEGE LIBRARY. 
315 Third St., Fred Osborne, Libn. 

WATSONVILLE JT. UNION HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 250 Third St. 

Ida A. Fuller, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,250 ; Circ : 19,863 

Total vols : 11,325 ; New : 779 

Subs : Mags : 131 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 83 ; Stud : 1,877 ; Grades : 9-12 

WATSONVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Collins, Libn. 



WEAVERVILLE (Trinity Co.) 

TRINITY CO. FREE LIBRARY. Box 
AB. Mrs. Doris Clement, Libn. 

Serves : Entire county. 

Outlets: 30 

Branches : Hayfork 

Stations : Hyampom, Island Mt., Lake 

Mt., Ruth, South Fork Mt., Trinity 

Center, Wildwood, Zenla 
Bookmobile stops : 2 
Schools : 18 

TRINITY CO. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY, Mrs. Agnes Montgomery, 
Libn. 

TRINITY CO. LAW LIBRARY. 

Courthouse. 

TRINITY CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 



WEED (Siskiyou Co.) 

COLLEGE OF THE SISKIYOUS LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 1025. James N. 
Simmons, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

WEED HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



WEIMAR (Placer Co.) 

THE WEIMAR JOINT SANATO- 
RIUM LIBRARY, The county libraries 
of the several counties cooperating in 
the upkeep of the sanatorium send in 
books and magazines. 



WEST LOS ANGELES 

See under Los Angeles. 

WEST COVINA (Los Angeles Co.) 

WEST COVINA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 1601 E. Cameron. Mrs. Si- 
mone Monteverde, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 2 clerks 
Book fund : $5,000 ; Circ : 22.000 
Total vols : 10.000 ; New : 2.000 
Subs : Mags : 70 ; Newsp : 3 
Fac : 60 ; Stud : 1,500 ; Grades : 9-12 

WEST SACRAMENTO (Yolo Co.) 

JAMES MARSHALL HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 1100 Ciarenden. James 

Metcaif, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2^300 ; Circ : 13,000 

Total vols : 5,119 ; New : 604 

Subs : Mags : 95 ; Newsp : 4 

Fac : 51 ; Stud : 1,190 ; Grades : 9-12 

WASHINGTON UNIFIED SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. Evergreen and W. Acres 
Rds. Dorothy Corcoran, Libn. 
See centralized school libraries taMe. 



WESTMINSTER (Orange Co.) 

WESTMINSTER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 14325 Goldenwest. Mildred 
G. Wilson, Libn. 
Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 
Book fund : $10,000 ; Circ : 200 
Total vols : 4.489 ; New : 2,856 
Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 8 
Fac : 74 ; Stud : 2,000 ; Grades : 9-12 



WESTWOOD (Lassen Co.) 

WESTWOOD JR.-SR. HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. 5th and Del- 
wood. 

Staff : 1 clerk 

Total vols : 5.000 

Subs : Mags : 30 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 10 ; Stud : 180 ; Grades : 7-12 



WHEATLAND (Yuba Co.) 

WHEATLAND HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Box 398. 

Subs : Mags : 4 

Fac : 14 ; Stud : 265 ; Grades : 9-12 



WHITTIER (Los Angeles Co.) 

CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 9800 S. Mills Ave. Geraldine 
Bergan, Libn. 

FRED C. NELLES SCHOOL FOR 
BOYS LIBRARY. 

PIONEER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10800 E. Benavon. Richard 
A. Hovelsrud, Libn. 

SANTA FE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 10400 S. Orr and Day Road, 
Santa Fe Springs. 

WHITTIER COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

Benjamin Whitten, Libn. 

See state and other four-year colleges 
table. 

BROADOAKS SCHOOL OF 

EDUCATION LIBRARY. 

WHITTIER HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 610 W. Philadelphia. Joieen 
Bock, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn : 1 clerk 

Book fund : $3,500 ; Circ : 13,741 

Total vols : 12.924 ; New : 950 

Subs : Mags : 83 ; Newsp : 2 

Fac : 90 ; Stud : 1,900 ; Grades : 9-12 

WHITTIER PUBLIC LIBRARY. 336 
S. Washington Ave. Margaret Fui- 
mer, Libn. 

WHITTIER UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
DIST., INSTRUCTIONAL MATE- 
RIALS CENTER. 902 W. Washington 
Blvd. De Loss E. Williams, Dir. 

See centralized school libraries table. 

WILLIAMS (Colusa Co.) 

WILLIAMS UNIFIED SCHOOLS LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. Carol Sites, Libn-Clerk. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $1,000 

Total vols : 3,000 ; New : 100 

Subs : Mags : 12 

Fac : 26 ; Stud : 100 ; Grades : 7-12 

WILLITS (Mendocino ^o.) 

WILLITS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
Erma Conant, Libn. 

Staff : 1 teacher-libn 

Total vols : 5,600 ; New : 1,200 

Subs : Mags : 17 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 30 ; Stud : 600 ; Grades : 1-12 

WILLITS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 87 E. 
Commercial St., P.O. Box 7. Mrs. Lu- 
cille L. Elliott, Libn. 

WILLOWS (Glenn Co.) 

GLENN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
Memorial Building, W. Sycamore St. 
Mrs. Addah W. Bedford, Libn. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



221 



Serves : Entire county 

AflBiliated with : Orland Free Library 

and Willows Public Library. 
Outlets: 30 
Branches : Bayliss, Capay, Hamilton 

City. 
Stations : Artois, Butte City, Codora, 

Chrome, Glenn, Supt. of Schools 

Office, Veteran's Office, County Jail. 
Schools : 15 

GLENN CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

GLENN CO. TEACHERS LI- 
BRARY. Glenn Hoffman, Co. Supt. 
Included in Co. F.L. 

1 GLENN CO. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. Mrs. A. Genevieve Borene, 
Libn. 

WILLOWS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 336 
W. Walnut St. Elizabeth Eubank, 
Libn. 

Affiliated with : Glenn Co. F.L. 



Available to : Co. staff and other li- 
braries. 

Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting 

WILMINGTON JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 1700 Gulf Ave. Mrs. Aletha 

H. Fletcher, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Book fund : $2,552.38 ; Circ : 15,589 

Total vols : 9,444 ; New : 1,100 

Subs : Mags : 134 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 99 ; Stud : 2,464 ; Grades : 7-9 



WINTERS (Yolo Co.) 

WINTERS JOINT UNION HIGH 
SCHOOL LIBRARY. Grant Ave., P.O. 
Box 605. 



WOODLAKE (Tulare Co.) 

WOODLAKE HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. P.O. Box 608. 



WILMINGTON (Los Angeles Co.) 

LOS ANGELES HARBOR COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 1111 Figueroa Place. Mrs. 
Thelma V. Taylor, Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 

PHINEAS BANNING HIGH SCHOOL 

LIBRARY. 1500 Avalon. Florence 

Gregory, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1 clerk 

Rook fund : $5,193.73 ; Circ : 25,000 

Total vols : 9,925 ; New : 1,012 

Subs : Mags : 120 ; Newsp : 3 

Fac : 123 ; Stud : 2,433 ; Grades : 10-12 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION, 

Technical Library. 1907 E. Sepulveda, 

P.O. Box 787. Mrs. Hester L. Dale, 

Libn. Tel: TE 4-2521, 

Staff : 1 libn ; 1.5 others 

Total vols : 3,300 ; Pams : 1,500 

New titles : 300 ; VF drawers : 15 

Subs : Mags : 300 ; Newsp : 4 

Special collections : Petroleum refining, 

corrosion and waste disposal 
Available -"to : Co. staff, other libraries, 

and public by referral 
Interlibrary loan : Limited to special re- 
quests 
Services : Literature searching ; bibliog- 
raphies ; photostat copying ; briefing 
and abstracting ; centralized procure- 
ment of publications and subscrip- 
tions. 

TURCO PRODUCTS INC., TECHNI- 
CAL LIBRARY. 24600 S. Main, P.O. 
Box 1055. Grace A. Moore, Libn. 
Staff : 1 
Purpose : Primarily serves Research and 

Development Dept. 
Total vols: 1,500 
Subs : Mags : 85 



WOODLAND (Yolo Co.) 

WOODLAND FREE PUBLIC LI- 
BRARY. 1st and Court Sts. Ritchie 
Thomas, Libn. 

WOODLAND HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. College and Hayes St. 

YOLO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
First and Court Sts. Mrs. Vivian G. 
Douglas, Acting Libn. 

Serves : Entire county except Woodland 
City 

Outlets : 36 

Stations : Broderick, Capay, Davis, 
Dunnigan, Esparto, Knights Land- 
ing, Rumsey, West Sacramento, Win- 
ters, Yolo 

Bookmobile stops: 25 

YOLO CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 

YOLO CO. SCHOOL LIBRARY. 723 
Main St. Betty Milligan, Libn. 

See centralized school libraries table. 



WOODLAND HILLS (Los Angeles Co.) 

FRANCIS PARKMAN JR. HIGH 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 208000 Burbank 

Blvd. John F. McTighe, Libn. 

Staff : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $6,000 ; Circ : 10,000 

Total vols : 4,800 ; New : 2,400 

Subs : Mags : 35 ; Newsp : 1 

Fac : 55 ; Stud : 1,556 ; Grades : 7-9 

LOS ANGELES PIERCE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY. 6201 Winnetka Ave. Hel- 
ene S. Sloat, Head Libn. 

See junior college libraries table. 



222 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



WOODSIDE (San Mateo Co.) 

WOODSIDEHIGH SCHOOL LI 
BRARY. 

See Redwood City. 



YORBA LINDA (Orange Co.) 

YORBA LINDA DISTRICT LI- 
BRARY. 18262 Lemon Dr. Mrs. Mae 
P. Barlass, Libn. 



YOSEMITE (Mariposa Co.) 

YOSEMITE MUSEUM RESEARCH 
LIBRARY. Yosemite National Park. 
Ruth Glass, Libn. 



YREKA (Siskiyou Co.] 

SISKIYOU COUNTY FREE LI- 
BRARY. 300 So. Fourth St. Mrs. 
Thora Selistrom, Libn. 

Serves : entire county 

Affiliated with : Etna Public Library 

Outlets : 60 

Stations : Bogus, Callahan, Cecilville, 
Copco, County Hospital, Dorris, 
Dunsmuir, Edgewood, Forks of Sal- 
mon, Fort Jones, Greenview, Happy 
Camp, Hilt, Hornbrook, Horse Creek, 
McCloud, Montague, Mt. Hebron- 
Macdoel, Mount Shasta, Mount Shasta 
Hospital, Pondosa, Sawyers Bar, 
Scott Bar, Seiad Valley, Somes Bar, 
Tulelake, Walker, Weed 

Schools : 29 



SISKIYOU CO. TEACHERS 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 



LI 



YREKA HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. 
412 W. Miner. Eleanor Harris, Libn. 

YREKA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 412 W. 
Miner. Mrs. Eleanor Harris, Libn. 

YUBA CITY (Sutter Co.) 

SUTTER COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 
463 Second St. Mrs. Irminna Rudge, 
Libn. 

Serves : entire county 

Outlets : 36 

Stations : Barber, Bear River, East 
Nicolaus, Meridian, Nicolaus, Pleas- 
ant Grove, Rio Oso, Robbins, Sutter 

Schools : 26 

SUTTER CO. LAW LIBRARY. Court- 
house. 



SUTTER CO. TEACHERS 
BRARY. Included in Co. F.L. 



Ll- 



SISKIYOU CO. 
Courthouse. 



LAW LIBRARY. 



YUBA CITY UNION HIGH SCHOOL 
LIBRARY. 850 B Street. Mrs. Jose- 
phine Tompkins, Libn. 

Stafe : 1 libn ; i clerk 

Book fund : $2,500 ; Circ : 19,794 

Total vols : 6,296 ; New : 640 

Subs : Mags : 95 ; Newsp : 6 

Fac : 72 ; Stud : 1,420 ; Grades : 9-12 



YUCAIPA (San Bernardino Co.) 

YUCAIPA JR. HIGH SCHOOL LI- 
BRARY. 12358 6th St., Yucaipa. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



223 



INDEX TO HEADQUARTERS, BRANCHES AND 

STATIONS OF COUNTY LIBRARIES 

ARRANGED BY PLACE 

The abbrevations indicate the nature of the public library outlet. 
They are : Hq. — Headquarters ; Br. — Branch ; St. — Station. 

^delanto, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Adin, Modoc Co. 8t. 

Aetna, Napa Co. St. 

Aguanga, Riverside Co. St. 

Ahwahnee, Madera Co. St. 

Alamo, Contra Costa Co. St. 

Alba, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Aklerpoint, Humboldt Co. St. 

Alisal, Monterey Co. St. 

Alleghany, Sierra Co. St. 

Alpine, San Diego Co. St. 

Alpaugh, Tulare Co. St. 

Alta Loma, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Alturas, Modoc Co. Hq. 

Alum Rock, Santa Clara Co. St. 

Alvarado, Alameda Co. St. 

Amador City, Amador Co. St. 

Amsterdam, Merced Co. St. 

Anderson, Shasta Co. St. 

Angels Camp, Calaveras Co. St. 

Annapolis, Sonoma Co. St. 

Antioch, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Applegate, Placer Co. St. 

Apple Valley, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Aptos, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Arbuckle, Colusa Co. St. 

Arcade, Sacramento Co. St. 

Arden, Sacramento Co. St. 

Arlington, Riverside Co. Br. 

Armona, Kings Co. St. 

Aromas, Monterey Co. St. 

Aromitas, San Benito Co. St. 

Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Artesia, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Artois, Glenn Co. St. 

Arvin, Kern Co. St. 

Arvin Mig, Kern Co. St. 

Atascadero, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Atherton, San Mateo Co. St. 

Atwater, Merced Co. St. 

Auberry, Fresno Co. St. 

Auburn, Placer Co. Hq. 

Avalon, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Avenal, Kings Co. St. 

Avenue, Ventura Co. St. 

Baker, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Baker Street, Kern Co. Br. 
Bakersfield, Kern Co. Hq. 
Bakersfield College, Kern Co. St. 
Baldwin Park, Los Angeles Co.i?r. 
Ballico, Merced Co. St. 
Bandini, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Bangor, Butte Co. St. 
Banner Queen, San Diego Co. St. 
Bar-49, Napa Co. St. 
Barber, Sutter Co. St. 



Barber City, Orange Co. St. 
Barstow, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Bayliss, Glenn Co. Br. 
Bayshore, San Mateo Co. St. 
Bayside, Humboldt Co. St. 
Bear River, Sutter Co. St. 
Bear Valley, Mariposa Co. St. 
Bear Valley, San Benito Co. St. 
Beckwourth, Plumas Co. St. 
Belden, Plumas Co. St. 
Bell, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Bella Vista, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Bella Vista, Shasta Co. St. 
Bellflovsrer, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Bell Gardens, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Belmont, San Mateo Co. Hq. 
Belridge, Kern Co. St. 
Belevedere, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Belevedere-Tiburon, Marin Co. St. 
Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Bernabe, Monterey Co. St. 
Bethel Island, Contra Costa Co. St. 
Bieber, Lassen Co. St. 
Big Bear, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Big Creek, Fresno Co. St. 
Big Creek #2, Fresno Co. St. 
Big Oak Flat, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Big Pine, Inyo Co. St. 
Big Sur, Monterey Co. St. 
Biola, Fresno Co. St. 
Bishop, Inyo Co. St. 
Bittervt^ater, San Benito Co. St. 
Blocksburg, Humboldt Co. St. 
Bloomfield, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Bloomington, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Blue Lake, Humboldt Co. St. 
Bogus, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Bolinas, Marin Co. St. 
Bolsa Knolls, Monterey Co. St. 
Boron, Kern Co. St. 
Borrego, San Diego Co. St. 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Boulevard, San Diego Co. St. 
Boyes Hot Springs, Sonoma Co. St. 
Bradley, Monterey Co. St. 
Brea, Orange Co. St. 
Brentwood, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Bridgeport, Mono Co. St. 
Brisbane, San Mateo Co. St. 
Broderick, Yolo Co. St. 
Browns Valley, Napa Co. St. 
Brush Creek, Butte Co. St. 
Buellton, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Burbank, Santa Clara Co. St. 
Burney, Shasta Co. St. 
Butte City, Glenn Co. St. 



224 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Buttonwillow, Kern Co. St. 
Byron, Contra Costa Co. St. 

0abazon, Riversrde Co. St. 
Caliente, Kern Co. St. 
Caliente Springs, San Diego Co. St. 
California City, Kern Co. St. 
Calipatria, Imperial Co. St. 
Calistoga, Napa Co. St. 
Callahan, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Calwa, Fresno Co. St. 
Camanche, Calaveras Co. St. 
Camarillo, Ventura Co. St. 
Cambria, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Camino, El Dorado Co. St. 
Campbell, Santa Clara Co. Br. 
Campo, San Diego Co. St. 
Canyon Crest, Riverside Co. St. 
Capay, Glenn Co. Br. 
Capay, Yolo Co. St. 
Capitola, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Cardiff, San Diego Co. St. 
Caribou, Plumas Co. St. 
Carmel Valley, Monterey Co. St. 
Carmicbael, Sacramento Co. St. 
Carneros, Kern Co. St. 
Carpinteria, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Carson, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Caruthers, Fresno Co. St. 
Casa Blanca, Riverside Co. Br. 
Casitas. Ventura Co. St. 
Castella, Shasta Co. St. 
Castle Park, San Diego Co. St. 
Castro Hill, Alameda Co. St. 
Castro Valley, Alameda Co. Br. 
Castroville, Monterey Co. St. 
Cathedral City, Riverside Co. St. 
Cayucos, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Cazadero, Sonoma Co. St. 
Cecilville, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Cedarville, Modoc Co. St. 
Centerville, Alameda Co. Br. 
Central Valley, Shasta Co. St. 
Ceres, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Charter Oak, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Chawanakee, Fresno Co. St. 
Chester, Plumas Co. St. 
Chico, Butte Co. St. 
Chilcoot, Plumas Co. St. 
Chino, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Chowchilla, Madera Co. Br. 
Chrome, Glenn Co. St. 
Chualar, Monterey Co. St. 
City Terrace, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Claremont, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Clarks Fork, Kings Co. St. 
Clements, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Clipper MiUs, Butte Co. St. 
Clovis, Fresno Co. Br. 
Coarsegold, Madera Co. St. 
Codora, Glenn Co. St. 
Colfax, Placer Co. St. 
College City, Colusa Co. St. 
Colma, San Mateo Co. St. 
Columbia, Tuolunme Co. Br. 



Colusa, Colusa Co. Hq. 
Compton, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Concord, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Copco, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Copperopolis, Calaveras Co. St. 
Corcoran, Kings Co. St. 
Corralitos, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Corte Madera, Marin Co. St. 
Costa Mesa, Orange Co. Br. 
Cotati, Sonoma Co. St. 
Cottonv70od, Shasta Co. St. 
Courtland, Sacramento Co. St. 
Crannell, Humboldt Co. St. 
Crescent Mills, Plumas Co. St. 
Cressey, Merced Co. St. 
Cresta, Butte Co. St. 
Crestline, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Creston, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Crockett, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Cromberg, Plumas Co. St. 
Cucamonga, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Culver City, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Cupertino, Santa Clara Co. Br. 
Cuyama, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Cypress, Orange Co. St. 

]3ana Point, Orange Co. 8t. 

Danville, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Davenport, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Davis, Yolo Co. St. 

Davis Creek, Modoc Co. St. 

Decoto, Alameda Co. St. 

Delano, Kern Co. Br. 

Delhi, Merced Co. St. 

Del Mar, San Diego Co. St. 

Del Paso, Sacramento Co. St. 

Del Rey, Fresno Co. St. 

Denair, Stanislaus Co. St. 

De Sabla, Butte Co. St. 

Descanso, San Diego Co. St. 

Desert Center, Riverside Co. St. 

Desert Hot Springs, Riverside Co. St. 

Dinuba, Tulare Co. St. 

Dominguez, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Dorris, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Dos Palos, Merced Co. St. 

Downieville, Sierra Co. St. 

Duarte, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Ducor, Tulare Co. St. 

Dulzura, San Diego Co. St. 

Dunnigan, Yolo Co. St. 

Dunsmuir, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Durham, Butte Co. St. 

Dutch Flat, Placer Co. St. 

Eagle Mountain, Riverside Co. St 

Earlimart, Tulare Co. St. 

East Compton, Los Angeles Co. St. 

East Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co. St. 

East Nicolaus, Sutter Co. St. 

Easton, Fresno Co. St. 

East Valley, San Bernardino Co. St, 

East Ventura, Ventura Co. St. 

Edgewood, Siskiyou Co. St. 



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Edwards, Kern Co. St. 
El Cajon, San Diego Co. Br. 
El Centro, Imperial Co. Hq. 
El Cerrito, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
El Granada, San Mateo Co. St. 
Elk Grove, Sacramento Co. St. 
El Marino, Los Angeles Co. ;Sf*. 
El Modena, Orange Co. St. 
El Monte, Los Angeles Co. St. 
El Nido, Merced Co. St. 
El Portal, Mariposa Co. St. 
El Sobrante, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Empire, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Encinitas, San Diego Co. Br. 
Enterprise, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Enterprise, Shasta Co. St. 
Escalon, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Escondido, San Diego Co. St. 
Esparto, Yolo Co. St. 
Essex, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Etiwanda, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Ettersburg, Humboldt Co. St. 
Eureka, Humboldt Co. Hq. 
Exeter, Tulare Co. St. 

Fairfax, Kern Co. St. 
Fairfax, Marin Co. St. 
Fairfield, Solano Co. Hq. 
Fairmont, Alameda Co. *S^*. 
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co. St. 
Fair Oaks, San .Toaquin Co. Br. 
Fallbrook, San Diego Co. St. 
Fall River Mills, Shasta Co. St. 
Farmersville, Tulare Co. St. 
Feather Falls, Butte Co. St. 
Fellows, Kern Co. St. 
Felton, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Fieldbrook, Humboldt Co. St. 
Fillmore, Ventura Co. St. 
Firebaugh, Fresno Co. St. 
Fletcher Hills, San Diego Co. St. 
Florence, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Florin, Sacramento Co. St. 
Flournoy, Tehama Co. St. 
Folsom, Sacramento Co. St. 
Fontana, San Bernardino Co. Br. 
Foothill, Sacramento Co.. St. 
Forbestown, Butte Co. St. 
Foresthill, Placer Co. St. 
Forest Knolls, Marin Co. St. 
Forest Ranch, Butte Co. St. 
Forestville, Sonoma Co. St. 
Forks of Salmon, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Fort Jones, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Fort Seward, Humboldt Co. St. 
Fortuna, Humboldt Co. St. 
Fowler, Fresno Co. St. 
Francisquito, San Mateo Co. St. 
Franz Valley, Sonoma Co. St. 
Freedom, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
French Gulch, Shasta Co. St. 
Fresno, Fresno Co. Hq. 
Fricot Ranch School, Calaveras Co. St. 
Friendly Hills, Los Angeles Co. Br. 



Fruitridge, Sacramento Co. St. 
Fruitvale, Kern Co. St. 
Furnace Creek, Inyo Co. St. 

Qalt, Sacramento Co. St. 
Garberville, Humboldt Co. St. 
Gardena, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Garden Grove, Orange Co. Br. 
Garvey, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Georgetown, El Dorado Co. St. 
Gerber, Tehama Co. St. 
Geyserville, Sonoma Co. St. 
Giant Club, Fresno Co. St. 
Giant Forest, Tulare Co. St. 
Gillis, Fresno Co. Br. 
Glen Avon, Riverside Co. St. 
Glendale, Humboldt Co. St. 
Glen Ellen, Sonoma Co. St. 
Glen Helen, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Glenn, Glenn Co. St. 
Glennville, Kern Co. St. 
Goleta, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Gonzales, Monterey Co. St. 
Graham, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Grangeville, Kings Co. St. 
Grant Grove, Tulare Co. St. 
Graton, Sonoma Co, St. 
Greenfield, Kern Co. St. 
Greenfield, Monterey Co. St. 
Greenview, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Greenville, Plumas Co. St. 
Grimes, Colusa Co. St. 
Grossmont, San Diego Co. St. 
Groveland, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Grover City, San Luis Obispo Co. St 
Guadalupe, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Guerneville, Sonoma Co. St. 
Gustine, Merced Co. St. 

Hacienda, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Hagginwood, Sacramento Co. St. 
Halcyon, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Half Moon Bay, San Mateo Co. St. 
Hamilton City, Glenn Co. Br. 
Hanford, Kings Co. Hq. 
Happy Camp, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Hardwick, Kings Co. St. 
Harris, Humboldt Co. St. 
Hat Creek, Shasta Co. St. 
Hawthorne, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Hayward, Alameda Co. Hq. 
Herald, Sacramento Co. St. 
Hercules, Contra Costa Co. St. 
Herlong, Lassen Co. St. 
Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Highgrove, Riverside Co. St. 
Highland, Alameda Co. St. 
Highland, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Hilt, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Hinkley, San Bernardino Co. St. 
HoUister, San Benito Co. Hq. 
Hollydale, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Holtville, Imperial Co. St. 
Honeydew, Humboldt Co. St. 
Hoopa, Humboldt Co. St. 



226 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAElES 



Hombrook, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Horse Creek, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Hot Creek, Mono Co. St. 
Hughson, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Huntington Park, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Hyampom, Trinity Co. St. 
Hydesville, Humboldt Co. St. 

Idyllwild, Riverside Co. St. 
Imperial, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Imperial Beach, San Diego Co. St. 
Independence, Inyo Co. Hq. 
Independence, Mono Co. Hq. 
Inglewood, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Inskip, Tehama Co. St. 
Inverness, Marin Co. St. 
lone, Amador Co. St. 
Irvington, Alameda Co. St. 
Irwin, Merced Co. St. 
Isabella, Kern Co. St. 
Island, Kings Co. St. 
Island Mt., Trinity Co. St. 
Isleton, Sacramento Co. St. 
Ivanhoe, Tulare Co. St. 

Jackson, Amador Co. Hq. 
Jacumba, San Diego Co. St. 
Jamesburg, Monterey Co. St. 
Jameson Camp, Kern Co. St. 
Jamestown, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Jauesville, Lassen Co. St. 
Johannesburg, Kern Co. St. 
Johnsondale, Tulare Co. St. 
Joshua Tree, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Julian, San Diego Co. St. 

Kaiser Hospital, Solano Co. St. 

Keene, Kern Co., St. 
Kelso, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Kensington, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Kentfield, Marin Co. St. 
Kerman, Fresno Co. St. 
Kernville, Kern Co. St. 
Kettleman City, Kings Co. St. 
Keyes, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Kingsburg, Fresno Co. St. 
Kings River, Fresno Co. St. 
Kings River, Kings Co. St. 
Kirkwood, Tehama Co. St. 
Knightsen, Contra Costa Co. St. 
Knights Landing, Yolo Co. St. 
Korbel, Humboldt Co. St. 
Kruse Ranch, Sonoma Co. St. 

La Canada, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Lacy Security Facility, Orange Co. St. 

Ladoga, Colusa Co. St. 

Lafayette, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Laguna Beach, Orange Co. St. 

La Habra, Orange Co. Br. 

Lake Arrowhead, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Lakehead, Shasta Co. St. 

Lake Mt., Trinity Co. St. 

Lakeside, San Diego Co. St. 

Lake Valley, El Dorado Co. Br. 



Lakewood, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
La Mesa, San Diego Co. Br. 
La Mirada, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Lamont, Kern Co. St. 
Lancaster, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
La Porte, Plumas Co. St. 
La Puente, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
La Selva, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
La Sierra, Riverside Co. St. 
Las Plumas, Butte Co. St. 
Lathrop, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Laton, Fresno Co. St. 
La Verne, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Lawndale, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Lee Vining, Mono Co. St. 
Le Grand, Merced Co. St. 
Lemon Grove, San Diego Co. Br. 
Lemoore, Kings Co. St. 
Lennox, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Lincoln Acres, San Diego Co. St. 
Lincoln Park, Riverside Co. Br. 
Linden, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Lindsay, Tulare Co. St. 
Litchfield, Lassen Co. St. 
Littlerock, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Live Oak, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Livingston, Merced Co. St. 
Lockwood, Monterey Co. St. 
Lodi, Napa Co. St. 
Loleta, Humboldt Co. St. 
Lomita, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Lone Pine, Inyo Co. St. 
Long Barn, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Lookout, Modoc Co. St. 
Loomis, Placer Co. St. 
Los Alamos, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Los Alamitos, Orange Co. St. 
Los Altos, Santa Clara Co. Br. 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co. Hq. 
Los Banos, Merced Co. St. 
Los Molinos, Tehama Co. St. 
Los Nietos, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Los Olivos, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Los Robles, Tehama Co. St. 
Lost Hills, Kern Co. St. 
Loyalton, Sierra Co. St. 
Lucerne, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Lynwood, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

]y[cCloud, Siskiyou Co. St. 

McFarland, Kern Co. Br. 

McKittrick, Kern Co. St. 

Madeline, Lassen Co. St. 

Madera, Madera Co. Hq. 

Magalia, Butte Co. St. 

Magnolia, Imperial Co. St. 

Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Manhattan Heights, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Manteca, San Joaquin Co. St. 

Maravilla, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Marcy, Riverside Co. Br. 

Maricopa, Kern Co. St. 

Marina, Monterey Co. St. 

Marin City, Marin Co. St. 

Mariposa, Mariposa Co. St. 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



227 



Mark Twain Hospital, Calaveras Co. Hi. 
Martinez, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Masonic Hill, Alameda Co. Bt. 
Matilija, Ventura Co. St. 
Maxwell, Colusa Co. Bi. 
Maywood, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Meadow Vista, Placer Co. Bt. 
Mendota, Fresno Co. Bt. 
Mentone, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Merced, Mariposa & Merced Co. B.q. 
Meridian, Sutter Co. S,t. 
Mesa Grande, San Diego Co. Bt. 
Midway City, Orange Co. Bi. 
Midland, Riverside Co. Bi. 
Midpines, Mariposa Co. Bt. 
Milford, Lassen Co. Bi. 
Millbrae, San Mateo Co. Br. 
Millville, Shasta Co. Bt. 
Milpitas, Santa Clara Co. Bt. 
Mineral, Tehama Co. Bt. 
Minter, Kern Co. Bt. 
Miramonte, Fresno Co. Bt. 
Moccasin, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Modesto, Stanislaus Co. Hq. 
Mojave, Kern Co. Bt. 
Mokelumne Hill, Calaveras Co. Bt. 
Monmouth, Fresno Co. Bt, 
Montague, Siskiyou Co. Bt. 
Montclair, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Montebello, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Montecito, Santa Barbara Co. Bt. 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co. Bt. 
Montgomery Creek, Shasta Co. Bt. 
Moorpark, Ventura Co. Bt. 
Morgan Hill, Santa Clara Co. Bt. 
Morningside Park, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Morongo, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo Co. Bt. 
Mountain Pass, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Mountain View, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Mount Eden, Alameda Co. Bt. 
Mount Hamilton, Santa Clara Co. Bt. 
Mount Hebron-Mcdoel, Siskiyou Co. Bt. 
Mount Shasta, Siskiyou Co. Bt. 
Mount Wilson, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Mt. Baldy, San Bernardino Co. -Sf*. 
Murphys, Calaveras Co. Bt. 
Muscoy, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Museum, Merced Co. Bt. 

U"apa, Napa Co. Sq. 

Napa Junction, Napa Co. Bt. 

Navelencia, Fresno Co. Bt. 

Needles, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 

Newark, Alameda Co. Br. 

Newcastle, Placer Co. Bt. 

Newhall, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 

Newman, Stanislaus Co. Bt. 

Nicolaus, Sutter Co. Bt. 

Nile Garden, San Joaquin Co. Bt. 

Niles, Alameda Co. Br. 

Nipomo, San Luis Obispo Co. Bt. 

Norco, Riverside Co. Bt. 

North Branch, San Joaquin Co. Bt. 

North Fork, Madera Co. Bt. 



North Fresno, Fresno Co. Br. 
North Highlands, Sacramento Co. Bt. 
North Sacramento, Sacramento Co. Bt. 
Norwalk, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Norwood, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Novato, Marin Co. Br. 
Nuview, Riverside Co. Bt. 

Qakdale, Stanislaus Co. Bt. 

Oakhurst, Madera Co. Bt. 

Oakley, Contra Costa Co. Bt. 

Oak Run, Shasta Co. Bt. 

Oakvale, Kings Co. Bt. 

Oak View, Ventura Co. Bt. 

Oasis, Riverside Co. Bt. 

Occidental, Sonoma Co. Bt. 

Oceano, San Luis Obispo Co. Bt. 

Oil Center, Kern Co. Bt. 

Oildale, Kern Co. Br. 

Ojai, Ventura Co. Bt. 

Oleander, Fresno Co. Bt. 

Olive, Orange Co. Bt. 

Olive, Tehama Co. Bt. 

O'Neals, Madera Co. Bt. 

Ono, Shasta Co. Bi. 

Orange, Orange Co. Hq. 

Orange Cove, Fresno Co. Bt. 

Orangevale, Sacramento Co. Bt. 

Orcutt, Santa Barbara Co. Bt. 

Orinda, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Orleans, Humboldt Co. Bt. 

Oro Grande, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 

Orosi, Tulare Co. Bt. 

Oroville, Butte Co. Bq. 

pacheco, Contra Costa Co. Bt. 
Pacifica, San Mateo Co. Bt. 
Pajaro Monterey Co. Bt. 
Pala, San Diego Co. Bt. 
Palermo, Butte Co. Bt. 
Palmdale, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Palm Desert, Riverside Co. Bi. 
Palo Cedro, Shasta Co. Bt. 
Paloma, Calaveras Co. Bi. 
Palomar, San Diego Co. Bt. 
Panama, Kern Co. Bt. 
Panoche, San Benito Co. Bt. 
Panorama Heights, Tulare Co. Bt. 
Paradise, Butte Co. Bt. 
Paramount, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Parker Dam, San Bernardino Co. Bt. 
Parkfield, Monterey Co. Bt. 
Parlier, Fresno Co. Bi. 
Patterson, Stanislaus Co. Bt. 
Pauma, San Diego Co. Bt. 
Penryn, Placer Co. Bt. 
Pescadero, San Mateo Co. Bi. 
Petrolia, Humboldt Co. Bi. 
Pico, Los Angeles Co. Bt. 
Pine Creek, Tehama Co. Bt. 
Pinedale, Fresno Co. Bt. 
Pine Grove, Amador Co. Bt. 
Pinole, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Pioneer Camp, Sierra Co. Bi. 



228 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Pirn, Ventura Co. St. 

Pisrno Beach, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Pit #5, Shasta Co. St. 

Pittsburg, Contra Costa Co. Br. 

Pixley, Tulare Co. St. 

Placerville, El Dorado Co. Hq. 

Planada, Merced Co. St. 

Platina, Shasta Co. St. 

Pleasant Grove, Sutter Co. St. 

Pleasant Hill, Contra Costa Co. Hq. 

Pleasanton, Alameda Co. St. 

Plymouth, Amador Co. St. 

Pollock Pines, El Dorado Co. St. 

Pondosa, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Port Chicago, Contra Costa Co. St. 

Port Hueneme, Ventura Co. St. 

Portola, Plumas Co. St. 

Potrero, San Diego Co. St. 

Poway, San Diego Co. St. 

Pozo, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Pt. Reyes Station, Marin Co. St. 

Princeton, Colusa Co. St. 

Prunedale, Monterey Co. St. 

Pulga, Butte Co. St. 

Quartz Hill, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Quincy, Plumas Co. Hq. 
Quincy, Sierra Co. Hq. 

Rail Road Flat, Calaveras Co. St. 
Raisin, Fresno Co. St. 
Ramona, San Diego Co. St. 
Rancho Cordova, Sacramento Co. St. 
Randsburg, Kern Co. St. 
Ravendale, Lassen Co. St. 
Raymond, Madera Co. St. 
Red BlufE, Tehama Co. Hq. 
Red Cloud, Mariposa Co. St. 
Redding, Shasta Co. Hq. 
Red Rock, Kern Co. St. 
Reedley, Fresno Co. Br. 
Rialto, San Bernadino Co. St. 
Rice, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Richvale, Butte Co. St. 
Ridgecrest, Kern Co. St. 
Rio Dell, Humboldt Co. St. 
Rio Linda, Sacramento Co. St. 
Rio Oso, Sutter Co. St. 
Rio Vista, Solano Co. St. 
Ripley, Riverside Co. St. 
Ripon, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Rivera, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Riverbank, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Riverdale, Fresno Co. St. 
Riverside, Lassen Co. St. 
Riverside, Riverside Co. Hq. 
Robbing, Sutter Co. St. 
Robley, Monterey Co. St. 
Rocklin, Placer Co. St. 
Rodeo, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Roosevelt, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Rosamond, Kern Co. St. 
Rosemead, Los Angeles Co. Si 
Rosemont, Napa Co. St. 



Rovana, Inyo Co. St. 

Rubidoux, Riverside Co. St. 

Rumsey, Yolo Co. St. 

Running Springs, San Bernardino Co. 

St. 
Russell, Alameda Co. St. 
Ruth, Trinity Co. St. 
Rutherford, Napa Co. St. 

Sacramento, Sacramento Co. Hq. 

Salida, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Salinas, Monterey Co. Hq. 

Salvador, Napa Co. St. 

Samoa, Humboldt Co. St. 

San Andreas, Calaveras Co. Hq. 

San Ardo, Monterey Co. St. 

San Benito, San Benito Co. St. 

San Bernardino, San Bernardino Co. 

Hq. 
San Carlos, San Mateo Co. Br. 
Sanchez, San Mateo Co. St. 
San Clemente, Orange Co. St. 
San Diego, San Diego Co. Hq. 
San Dimas, Los Angeles Co. St. 
San Fernando, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
San Gabriel, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Sanger, Fresno Co. Br. 
San Joaquin, Fresno Co. St. 
San Jose, Santa Clara Co. Hq. 
San Juan Capistrano, Orange Co. St. 
San Lorenzo, Alameda Co. Br. 
San Lucas, Monterey Co. St. 
San Luis Obispo, San Luis Opispo 

Co. Hq. 
San Miguel, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
San Pablo, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
San Rafael, Marin Co. Hq. 
Santee, San Diego Co. St. 
San Vincente, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co. Hq. 
Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Co. Hq. 
Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo Co. 

St. 
Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co. Hq. 
Santa Tnez, Santa Barbara Co. St. 
Saratoga, Santa Clara Co. Br. 
Saticoy, Ventura Co. St. 
Saticoy Church, Ventura Co. St. 
Savsryers Bar, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Scotia, Humboldt Co. St. 
Scott Bar, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Scotts Valley, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Seal Beach, Orange Co. St. 
Seeley, Imperial Co. St. 
Seiad Valley, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Selma, Fresno Co. Br. 
Sepulveda, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Sequoia Home, Tulare Co. St. 
Shafter, Kern Co. Br. 
Shandon, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Sheepranch, Calaveras Co. St. 
Shell Beach, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Shingle Springs, El Dorado Co. St. 
Shively, Humboldt Co. St. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



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Shoshone, Inyo Co. St. 

Sierra City, Sierra Co. St. 

Sierraville, Sierra Co. St. 

Sierra Vista, Fresno Co. Br. 

Silverado, Orange Co. St. 

Silverthorn, Stanislaus Co. St. 

Simi, Ventura Co. St. 

Simmler, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

Snelling, Merced Co. St. 

Solana Beach, San Diego Co. St. 

Soledad, Monterey Co. St. 

Solvang, Santa Barbara Co. St. 

Somes Bar, Siskiyou Co. St. 

Somis, Ventura Co. St. 

Sonora, Tuolumne Co. Hq. 

Soquel, Santa Cruz Co. St. 

Sorensen, Los Angeles Co. St. 

South Bay, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 

South Dos Palos, Merced Co. St. 

South Fork Mt., Trinity Co. St. 

South Gate, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

South Laguna, Orange Co. St. 

South Madera, Madera Co. St. 

South Sacramento, Sacramento Co. St. 

South San Gabriel, Los Angeles Co. *S'*. 

South Whittier, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Spanish Flat, Napa Co. *S'*. 

Spreckles, Monterey Co. St. 

Spring Valley, San Diego Co. St. 

SpringvUle, Tulare Co. St. 

Standard, Tuolumne Co. Br. 

Standish, Lassen Co. St. 

Stanton, Orange Co. St. 

Stephenson, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Stevinson, Merced Co. St. 

Stinson Beach, Marin Co. St. 

Stirling City, Butte Co. St. 

Stockton, San Joaquin Co. Hq. 

Stony Brooke, Kern Co. St. 

Storrie, Plumas Co. St. 

Stonyford, Colusa Co. St. 

Stratford, Kings Co. St. 

Strathmore, Tulare Co. St. 

Summerland, Santa Barbara Co. St. 

Suncrest-La Cresta, San Diego Co. St. 

Sunkist, Los Angeles Co. Br. 

Sunnyslope, Los Angeles Co. St. 

Sunol, Alameda Co. St. 

Susanville, Lassen Co. Hq. 

Sutter, Sutter Co. St. 

Sutter Creek, Amador Co. St. 

Sylvan, Sacramento Co. St. 

Taft, Kern Co. Br. 
Tahoe City, Placer Co. St. 
Tahoe Vista, Placer Co. St. 
Tamalpais, Marin Co. St. 
Taylorsville, Plumas Co. St. 
Tecopa, Inyo Co. St. 
Tehachapi, Kern Co. St. 
Tehama, Tehama Co. St. 
Temecula, Riverside Co. St. 
Temple City, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
Templeton, San Luis Obispo Co. St. 
Terra BeUa, Tulare Co. St. 



Thermal, Riverside Co. St. 
Thornton, S3an Joaquin Co. St. 
Thousand Oaks, Ventura Co. St. 
Three Rivers, Tulare Co. St. 
Tierra del Sol, San Diego Co. St. 
Tipton, Tulare Co. St. 
Tomales, Marin Co. St. 
Trabuco, Orange Co. St. 
Tracy, San Joaquin Co. St. 
Tranquillity, Fresno Co. St. 
Trinidad, Humboldt Co. St. 
Trinity Center, Trinity Co. St. 
Trona, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Tulelake, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Tuolumne, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Tupman, Kern Co. St. 
Tustin, Orange Co. St. 
Twain, Plumas Co. St. 
Twain Harte, Tuolumne Co. Br. 
Twentynine Palms, San Bernardino Co. 

St. 
Twin Lakes, Santa Cruz Co. St. 
Twin Oaks, Kern Co. St. 

XJnion, Santa Clara Co. St. 

Valle Vista, Riverside Co. St. 
Valley Home, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Valley Springs, Calaveras Co. St. 
Ventura, Ventura Co. Hq. 
Verdemont, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Veterans Administration Hospital, 

Alameda Co. St. 
Victoria Park, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Victorville, San Bernardino Co. St. 
View Park, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Villa Carson, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Villa Park, Orange Co. St. 
Vina, Tehama Co. St. 
Vinton, Plumas Co. St. 
Virginia Avenue, Kern Co. St. 
Visalia, Tulare Co. Hq. 
Vista, San Diego Co. Br. 

Walker, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Walnut, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Walnut Creek, Contra Costa Co. Br. 
Walnut Grove, Sacramento Co. St. 
Wasco, Kern Co. Br. 
Waterford, Stanislaus Co. St. 
Weaverville, Trinity Co. Hq. 
Weed, Siskiyou Co. St. 
Weimar, Placer Co. St. 
Weldon, Kern Co. St. 
Wendel, Lassen Co. St. 
West Covina, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
West Fresno, Fresno Co. St. 
West Gardena, Los Angeles Co. Br. 
West Liberty, Butte Co. St. 
Westminster, Orange Co. St. 
Westmorland, Imperial Co. St. 
West Point, Calaveras Co. St. 
West Sacramento, Yolo Co. St. 
Westwood, Lassen Co. St. 
White Pines, Calaveras Co. St. 
Whitmore, Shasta Co. St. 



230 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Wildwood, Trinity Co. St. 
Williams, Colusa Co. St. 
Willowbrook, Los Angeles Co. St. 
WiUow Creek, Humboldt Co. St. 
Willow Ranch, Modoc Co. St. 
Willows, Glenn Co. Hq. 
Wilton, Sacramento Co. St. 
Windsor, Sonoma Co. St. 
Winterhaven, Imperial Co. St. 
Winters, Yolo Co. St. 
Winton, Merced Co. S't. 
Wiseburn, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Witch Creek, San Diego Co. St. 
Wofford, Kern Co. St. 
Woodacre, Marin Co. St. 
Woodcrest, Los Angeles Co. St. 
Woodlake, Tulare Co. St. 
Woodland, Yolo Co. Hg. 



Woodlands, Mariposa Co. St. 
Woodside, San Mateo Co. St. 
AVoody, Kern Co. St. 
Woodville, Tulare Co. St. 
Wrights, Santa Clara Co. St. 
Wynola, San Diego Co. St. 

Yermo, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Yolo, Yolo Co. St. 
Yosemite, Mariposa Co. St. 
Yountville, Napa Co. St. 
Yreka, Siskiyou Co. Hq. 
Yuba City, Sutter Co. Hq. 
Yucaipa, San Bernardino Co. St. 
Yucca, San Bernardino Co. St. 

Zenia, Trinity Co. St. 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



231 



INDEX TO NAMES OF LIBRARIES 

The Index to Names of Libraries has been prepared to guide users 
to the place of entry in the main directory of special, university, college, 
junior college, law, and public libraries not otherwise easily located. 
In general, each library in those categories which bears a proper, 
memorial or technical name and is not clearl.y identified with the com- 
munity in which it is located is entered here under the first word of 
the name. Place of entry in the directory is italicized. 

All municipal libraries with memorial names have been indexed. For 
quick reference, all county free libraries and county law libraries are 
indexed, unless the county seat and county have the same name. 

A few libraries with geographical names, which are actually located 
in and entered in the directory under a different place, are indexed 
{i.e., Los Angeles Pierce College Library, Woodland Hills). 

The index also includes the names of current library demonstration 
projects supported through federal funds {i.e. San Joaquin Valley In- 
formation Service). 

Distinctively named departmental branches of university and college 
libraries are included, but the index does not cover special collections 
as such. 

While the index does not attempt a subject approach, a few general 
finding references are used. Armed forces installation libraries are 
listed together under U.S. Armed Forces, and are individually indexed 
by memorial name, as needed. 

The use of inverted headings is limited. Colleges and universities, 
other than the University of California and the University of Southern 
California, have been entered under the significant word {i.e., Siskiyous, 
College of the). Punctuation will indicate inversion; the entry word 
in the main directory follows the semicolon. Multiple entries have been 
made for a few libraries with proper or memorial names, when usage 
seemed to warrant this {i.e., Henry E. Huntington and Huntington; 
Henry E.). 



A. K. Smiley Public Library, Redlands 

Academy of Motion Picture Arts & 
Sciences Library, Los Angeles 

Advertising & Marlvet Research Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Aerojet-General Corp., Engineering Li- 
brary, Boicney 

Aerojet-General Corp., Technical Li- 
brary, Sacramento 

Aeronutronic Library, Division of Ford 
Motor Co., Newport Beach 

Agnews State Hospital Libraries, *S'«7i 
Jose 

Airesearch Manufacturing Div. ; Gar- 
rett Corp., Los Angeles 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Hayioard 

Alameda Co. Law Library, Oakland 

Alameda Co. Medical Library, Oakland 

Alameda Co. Planning Dept. Staff Li- 
brary, Hayivard 

Alameda Co. State College Library, 
Haytcard 



Alcatraz ; U.S. Penitentiary, San Fran- 
cisco 

Allan Hancock Jr. College Library, 
Santa 31 aria 

Alliance Francaise Library, San Fran- 
cisco 

Alma College Library, Los Gatos 

Alpine Co. Law Library, Markleeville 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson 

American Merchant Marine Library, 
Los Angeles 

American Merchant Marine Library, 
San Francisco 

American Potash & Chemical Corp. Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

American River Junior College Library, 
Sacramento 

American Russian Institute Library, 
Son Francisco 

Ames Aeronautical Laboratory Library, 
Moffett Field 



232 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Ampex Corporation Technical Informa- 
tion Service Library, Redwood City 

Anglo California National Bank Li- 
brary, Redwood City 

Antelope Valley Jr. College Library, 
Lancaster 

Architecture and Allied Arts Library, 
Los Angeles 

Art Center School Library, Los Angeles 

Asia Foundation Library, Sari Fran- 
cisco 

Athearn, Chandler, & Hoffman Law Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Atomic Energy Project ; University of 
California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles 

Atomics International Technical Li- 
brary, Canoga Park 

Bacon Foundation, The Francis Baker 
Library ; Francis, Claremont 

Baker Branch Library ; U.S. Army. 
Fort, San Francisco 

Bancroft Library ; University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley 

Bank of America Law Library, San 
Francisco 

Bank of America Reference Library, 
San Francisco 

Barlow Sanatorium, Elks Tuberculosis 
Library, Los Angeles 

Bay Area Air Pollution Control District 
Library, San Francisco 

Beale Air Force Base Library ; U.S., 
Marysville 

Bechtel Corporation Library, San Fran- 
cisco 

Beckman Instruments Research Li- 
brary, Fullerton 

Belt Library of Vinciana ; University of 
California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles 

Bendix Aviation Corp. Technical Li- 
brary, North Hollywood 

Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corpora- 
tion, San Francisco 

Biola College Library, La Mirada 

Blanchard, Memorial Library ; Dean 
Hobbs, Santa Paula 

Bohemian Club Library, San Francisco 

Braille Institute Library, Los Angeles 

Branner Geological Library ; Stanford 
University, Stanford 

Braun & Co., Reference Library ; C. F., 
Alhamhra 

British Information Services Library, 
San Francisco 

Bruggemeyer Memorial Library, Mon- 
terey Park 

Buckley Library ; U.S. Naval Post- 
graduate School, Monterey 

Bureau of Government Research Li- 
brary ; University of California, Los 
Angeles, Los Angeles 

Bureau of Public Administration Li- 
brary ; University of California, 



Burk Library ; San Francisco State 
College Library ; Frederic, San Fran- 
cisco 

Burroughs Corporation, Electrodata Di- 
vision Library, Pasadena 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville 

Butte Co. Law Library, Oroville 

C. F. Braun & Co. Reference Library, 
Alhamira 

Calaveras Co. Free Library, San An- 
dreas 

Calaveras Co. Law Library, San An- 
dreas 

California Academy of Sciences Library, 
San Francisco 

California Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, Covina 

California College of Arts & Crafts Li- 
brary, Oakland 

California College of Chiropody, San 
Francisco 

California Concordia College Library, 
Oakland 

California Genealogical Society Library, 
San Francisco 

California Highway Patrol Academy Li- 
brary, Sacramento 

California Historical Society Library, 
San Francisco 

California Hospital Circulating Library, 
Los Angeles 

California Institute of Technology, 
Pasadena 

California Institution for Men, Ghino 

California Maritime Academy Library, 
Vallejo 

California Medical Facility Library, 
Vacaville 

California Men's Colony Library, San 
Luis Oiispo 

California Packing Corp., Scientific Re- 
search Dept. Library, San Francisco 

California Podiatry College Library, 
San Francisco 

California Research Corporation Li- 
brary, La Halra 

California Research Corporation Li- 
brary, Richmond 

California School for the Deaf Li- 
brary, Berkeley 

California Society, Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, San Francisco 

California Society, Sons of the Revolu- 
tion Library, Los Angeles 

California State Correctional Training 
Facility Libraries, Soledad 

California State Library, Sacramento 

California State Polytechnic College Li- 
brary, San Litis Ohispo 

California State Polytechnic College, 
Kellogg-Voorhis Campus, Pomona 

California State Prison at Folsom, Re- 
pressa 



VOLUME '^J, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



233 



California State Prison-San Quentin Li- 
brary, Ban Quentin 

California State School for the Blind 
Library, Berkeley 

California Taxpayers Association Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

California Teachers Association Re- 
search Information Center Library, 
Biirlingame 

California-Western States Life Insur- 
ance Co. Library, Sacramento 

California Western University Library, 
San Diego 

Carnation Research Laboratories Li- 
brary, Van Nuys 

Castle Air Force Base Library ; U.S., 
Merced 

Catholic Library of San Francisco ; 
Donahue Library, San Francisco 

Cedars of Lebanon Hospital Medical Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Cerritos Jr. College Library, Nonvalk 

Chabot Observatory Library, Oakland 

Chaffey College Library, Alta Loma 

Chapman College Library, Orange 

Charles R. Hadley Co. Systems Re- 
search Dept. Library, Los Angeles 

Chemical Library Service, Berkeley 

Children's Hospital of Los Angeles Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Chinese World Library, San Francisco 

Chouinard Art Institute Library, Los 
Angeles 

Church Divinity School of the Pacific 
Library, Berkeley 

Citrus College Library, Aawsa 

Citrus Research Center & Agricultural 
Experiment Station Library, of the 
University of California, Riverside 

Claremont Graduate School, see Associ- 
ated Colleges, Claremont 

Claremont Men's College, see Associated 
Colleges, Claremont 

Clark Memorial Library ; University of 
California, Los Angeles, William An- 
drews, Los Angeles 

Cogswell Polytechnical College Library, 
San Francisco 

Colorado River Board of California Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Columbia Pictures Corp., Research 
Dept. Library, Los Angeles 

Commonwealth Club of California Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Consolidated Electrodynamics Corp. Li- 
brary, Pasadena 

Continuing Education of the Bar ; Uni- 
versity of California, University Ex- 
tension, Berkeley 

Contra Costa College Library, San 
PaMo 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, Pleas- 
ant Hill 

Contra Costa County Law Library, 
Martinez 



Convair Engineering Library ; General 
Dynamics Corp., San Diego 

Crocker-Anglo National Bank Library, 
San Francisco 

Cubberly Education Library ; Stanford 
University, Stanford 

Dalmo Victor Company Technical Li- 
brary, Belmont 

Daystron-Wianko Engineering Com- 
pany, Technical Library, Pasadena 

Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial Li- 
brary, Santa Paula 

De Forest Research Service Library, 
Los Angeles 

Desert ; College of the. Palm Desert 

Deuel Vocational Institution Library, 
Tracy 

DeWitt State Hospital Libraries, Au- 
iurn 

de Young Museum, Art Reference Li- 
brary ; M. H., San Francisco 

Diablo Valley College Library, Concord 

Disney Productions Library ; Walt, Bur- 
iank 

Doheny Memorial Library ; St. John's 
College, Edward L., Camarillo 

Dominican College of San Rafael Li- 
brary, San Rafael 

Donahue Library (Catholic Library of 
San Francisco), San Francisco 

Door-Oliver, Inc. Library, Oakland 

Douglas Aircraft Co. Inc., Library, 
Santa Monica 

Dow Chemical Co. Library, Pittsburg 

Edison Co. ; Southern California, Lg^s 
Angeles 

Edward L. Doheny Memorial Library ; 
St. John's College, Camarillo 

El Dorado Co. Free Library, Placerville 

El Dorado Co. Law Library, Placerville 

Electronic Technical Institute Library, 
Inglewood 

Elks Tuberculosis Library ; Barlow Sani- 
torium, Los Angeles 

Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana ; Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles, 
Los Angeles 

Fairview State Hospital, Medical Li- 
brary, Costa Mesa 

Falconer Biology Library ; Stanford 
University, Stanford 

Farmers Insurance Group Library, Los 
Angeles 

Farrand, Fisher & Farrand Law Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, 
Research Library, San Francisco 

Feuehtwanger Memorial Library ; Uni- 
versity of Southern California Library, 
Los Angeles 



234 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Fibreboard Paper Products Corp., Re- 
search & Development Dept., Oak- 
land 

Fitzgerald, Abbott & Beardsley Law Li- 
brary, Oakland 

Fleming Library ; Berkeley Baptist Di- 
vinity School, Sandford, Berkeley 

Folsom ; California State Prison at, 
Repressa 

Food Research Institute Library ; Stan- 
ford University, Stanford 

Foote, Cone, & Belding Inc. Library, 
Los Angeles 

Foothill College Library, Los Altos 
Hills 

Ford Motor Company ; Aeronutronic 
Library, Division of, Newport Beach 

Francis Bacon Foundation ; The Fran- 
cis Bacon Library, Claremont 

Franciscan Fathers' Theological Li- 
brary, Santa Barbara 

Frederick Burk Library ; San Francisco 
State College Library, San Francisco 

Fresno State College Library ; Bakers- 
field Center, Bakersfield 

Fuller Theological Seminary Library, 
Pasadena 

Fulton Memorial Library ; La Sierra 
College, Arlington 

Garret W. McEnerney School of Law 
Library ; University of California, 
Berkeley 

Garrett Corp. Airesearch Manufactur- 
ing Div. Library, Los Angeles 

General A. W. Vogdes Library of Geol- 
ogy & Paleontology ; Natural History 
Museum Library, San Diego 

General Atomic Division Library ; Gen- 
eral Dynamics Corp., San Diego 

General Dynamics-Convair Engineering 
Library, San Diego 

General Dynamics Corp., General Atomic 
Division Library, San Diego 

General Electric Company, Atomic 
Power Equipment Dept. Library, San 
Jose 

General Electric Traveling Wave Tube 
Section Technical Library, Palo Alto 

General Petroleum Corp. of California 
Technical Library, Los Angeles 

General Precision, Inc., Librascope Di- 
vision, Engineering Library, Glendale 

George Air Force Base Library; U.S., 
Victorville 

George Pepperdine College Library, Los 
Angeles 

Giannini Foundation of Agricultural 
Economics Library ; University of 
California, Berkeley 

Gibson, Dumm & Crutcher Law Library, 
Los Angeles 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows 

Glenn Co. Law Library, WillGnvs 



Goethe Memorial Library of Religious 
Education ; Mary Glide, Sacramento 

Golden Gate Baptist Theological Sem- 
inary, Mill Valley 

Golden Gate College Library, San Fran- 
cisco 

Goodman Library, Napa 

Grand Central Rocket Co., Technical 
Library, Redlands 

Grizzly Bear Club Library (Formerly 
Native Sons Library), San Francisco 

Grossmont College Library, Spring Val- 
ley 

Gutman Library of the Sacramento Co. 
Society for Medical Improvement ; 
Paul H., Sacramento 

Hadley Co., Systems Research Dept. 
Library ; Charles R., Los Angeles 

Hancock Foundation Library ; Univer- 
sity of Southern California Library, 
Las Angeles 

Hancock Library of Biology & Oceanog- 
raphy ; University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles 

Harrison Memorial Library, Carmel 

Hartnell College Library, Salinas 

Harvey Mudd College, see Associated 
Colleges, Claremont 

Hastings College of the Law Library 
(University of California), Sf aw. Fran- 
cisco 

Helms Athletic Foundation Library, Los 
Angeles 

Henry E. Huntington Library & Art 
Gallery Library, San Marino 

Herbert Kraft Free Public Library, Red 
Bluff 

Hewlett-Packard Co. Technical Library, 
Palo Alto 

Hexcel Products Technical Library, 
Berkeley 

Historical Society of Southern Califor- 
nia ; Los Angeles County Museum 
Library, Los Angeles 

Hoffman Electronics Corp. Technical 
Library, Los Angeles 

Holy Names Library ; College of, Oak- 
land 

Honnold Library ; Associated Colleges, 
ClaremG-nt 

Hoose Library of Philosophy ; Univer- 
sity of Southern California Library, 
Los Angeles 

Hoover Institution on War, Revolution 
& Peace ; Stanford University, Stan- 
ford 

Hopkins Marine Station Library, Pacific 
Orove 

Hopkins Transportation Library ; Stan- 
ford University, Stanford 

Hughes Aircraft Co., Culver City Li- 
brary, Culver City 

Humboldt Co. Free Library, Eureka 



VOLTJME i^J, isrO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



235 



Humboldt Co. Law Library, Eureka 
Humboldt Co. Medical Association Li- 
brary, Eureka 
Humboldt State College Library, Areata 
Humphreys College Library, Stockton 
Huntington Library & Art Gallery Li- 
brary ; Henry E., San Marino 
Huntington Memorial Hospital, Medical 

Library, Pasadena 
Hyland Laboratories Library, Los An- 
geles 

IBM Advanced Systems Dept. & Re- 
search Library, San Jose 
Immaculate Heart College Library, Los 



Imperial Co. Free Library, El Centro 
Imperial Co. Law Library, El Centro 
Industrial Indemnity Co. Library, San 

Francisco 
Institute of Aeronautical Science ; Pa- 
cific Aeronautical Library, Los An- 
geles 
Institute of Aeronautical Sciences Li- 
brary, San Diego 
Institute of Transportation & Trafiic 
Engineering ; University of Califor- 
nia, Richmond 
Insurance Underwriters Association of 

the Pacific, San Francisco 
International Longshoremen's & Ware- 
housemen's Union Library, San Fran- 
cisco 
Inyo Co. Free Library, Independence 
Inyo Co. Law Library, Independence 
Irwin Post Library ; U.S. Fort, Barstow 

Jackson Library of Business ; Stanford 
University, Stanford 

James G. Prosser Library ; Western 
Personnel Institute, Pasadena 

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Library, 
Pasadena 

Jewish Community Library, Los Angeles 

Judaism, Tannenbaum Memorial Li- 
brary ; University of, Los Angeles 

Junipero Serra Museum Library ; San 
Diego Historical Society, San Diego 

Kaiser Foundation Hospital Medical 
Library, Los Angeles 

Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing 
Library, Oakland 

Kaiser-Oakland Foundation Hospital 
Medical Library, Oakland 

Kaiser Steel Corporation Library, Fon- 
tana 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield 

Kern Co. General Hospital Medical Li- 
brary, Bakersfield 

Kern Co. Health Dept. Library, Bakers- 
field 

Kern Co. Law Library, Bakersfield 



Kings Co. Free Library, Hanford 
Kings Co. Law Library, Hanford 
Kraft Free Public Library ; Herbert, 

Red Bluff 
Krakowski Memorial Library ; Sarah 

Cecilia, Pasadena 
Kyser Medical Library, Saint John's 

Hospital, Santa Monica 

Lane Medical Library ; Stanford Uni- 
versity, Stanford 

Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Insti- 
tute Library, San Francisco 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susanville 

Lassen Co. Law Library, Susanville 

Lassen Jr. College Library, Susanville 

Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Liver- 
more 

Lenkurt Electric Library, San Carlos 

Letterman General Hospital Medical 
Library ; U.S. Army, San Francisco 

Letterman General Hospital Post & 
Patients Library ; U.S. Army, San 
Francisco 

Library of Vehicles, Garden Grove 

Librascope Division, see General Preci- 
sion, Inc., Glendale 

Lick Observatory Library of the Univer- 
sity of California, Mount Hamilton 

Lockheed Missiles & Space Co., Techni- 
cal Information Center, Palo Alto 

Lockheed-California Company Engineer- 
ing Library (Lockheed Aircraft), 
Burhank 

Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Missiles & 
Space Division, Vun Nuys 

Loeb & Loeb Law Library, Los Angeles 

Lookout Mountain Air Force Station ; 
U.S. Air Force Technical Library, 
1352d Motion Picture Squadron, Los 
Angeles 

Los Angeles Baptist College & Seminary 
Library, Los Angeles 

Los Angeles College of Chiropractic Li- 
brary, Glendale 

Los Angeles County Harbor General 
Hospital, Medical Library, Torrance 

Los Angeles Harbor College Library, 
Wilmington 

Los Angeles Pierce College Library, 
Woodland Hills 

Los Angeles State & County Arboretum 
Library, Arcadia 

Los Angeles Valley College Library, 
Van Nuys 

Loyola University Law School Library, 
Los Angeles 

Loyola University of Los Angeles Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Luce, Forward, Hamilton, & Scripps 
Law Library, San Diego 



236 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



M-G-M Research Dept. Library, Culver 
City 

M. H. de Young Museum, Art Reference 
Library, San Francisco 

MacArthur Post Library ; U.S. Army, 
Fort, Los Angeles 

MacArthur Library System; U.S. Army, 
Fort, San Pedro 

McCann-Erickson, Inc. Library, San 
Francisco 

McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen 
Law Library, San Francisco 

McEnerney School of Law Library ; 
University of California, Garret W., 
Berkeley 

McGeorge College of Law Library, 
Sacramento 

McHenry Public Library, Modesto 

Marin ; College of. Library, Kentfield 

Marin Co. Free Library, San Rafael 

Marin Co. Law Library, San Rafael 

Mariposa Co. Free Library, Merced 

Mary Glide Goethe Memorial Library 
of Religious Education, Sacramento 

Marymount College Library, Palos 
Verdes Estates 

Mary's Help College of Nursing Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Mason Post Library ; U.S. Army, Fort, 
San Francisco 

Masonic Library of Southern California, 
Los Angeles 

Mechanics' Institute Library, San Fran- 
cisco 

Mendocino County Library Demonstra- 
tion, ZJkiah 

Mendocino State Hospital Medical Li- 
brary, Talmage 

Mercy College of Nursing Library, San 
Diego 

Mercy Hospital Library, San Diego 

Methodist Historical Society, Los An- 
geles, see Southern California School 
of Theology Librarj% Claremont 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., San 
Francisco 

Metropolitan State Hospital Medical 
Library, Norwalk 

Mills College Library, Oakland 

Mitchell Memorial Library ; Travis Air 
Force Base ; U.S., Fairfield 

Modoc Co. Free Library, Alturas 

Modoc Co. Law Library, Alturas 

Mono Co. Free Library, Independence 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas 

Monterey Co. Law Library, Salinas 

Monterey-Fresno Diocesan Library, 
Frestio 

Morrison, Foerster, HoUoway, Shuman 
& Clark Law Library, San Francisco 

Motion Picture Research Council, Inc. 
Library, Los Angeles 

Mount St. Mary's College Library, Los 



Mount Wilson Observatory Library, 
Pasadena 

Napa State Hospital, Imola 

National Cash Register Co., Electronics 

Division Library, Hawthorne 
Natural History Museum Library, San 



Nelson Memorial Library ; Pacific Union 
College, W. E., Angwin 

Neuropsychiatric Institute of the State 
Department of Mental Hygiene Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Newman Hall Library, Berkeley 

Norair Technical Information Unit Li- 
brary, Haivthorne 

North American Aviation Inc. Engi- 
neering Library, Ingleivood 

North American Aviation, Space & In- 
formation Systems Division Technical 
Information Library, Downey 

North Bay Cooperative Library System, 
Santa Rosa 

North Island Library ; U.S. Naval Air 
Station, San Diego 

Northrop Corp. ; Nortronics, Systems 
Support, Div. of, Anaheim 

Northrup Institute of Technology, Ingle- 
wood 

Norton Air Force Base ; U.S. Air Force 
San Bernardino Air Materiel Area 
Library, San Bernardino 

Nortronics, Systems Support, A Divi- 
sion of Northrop Corp. Library, Ana- 
heim 

Notre Dame ; College of. Library, Bel- 
mont 

Nutrilite Products Library, Buena Park 

Occidental College Library, Los Angeles 
Oceanside-Carlsbad College Library, 

Oakland 
Old Mission Library, Santa Barlara 
O'Melveny & Myers Law Library, Los 

Angeles 
Orange Coast College Library, Costa 

Mesa 
Orange Co. Law Library, Santa Ana 
Orange County State College, Fullerton 
Ord Library System, Presidio of Mon- 
terey Branch ; U.S. Army, Fort, Mon- 
terey 
Osteopathic Phyiscians & Surgeons Li- 
brary ; College of, Los Angeles 
Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles 
Our Lady of Light Library, Santa Bar- 
bara 
Our Lady of Mercy Library ; College of. 
Auburn 

Pacific Aeronautical Library, Institute 
of Aeronautical Science, Los Angeles 

Pacific Bible Seminary Library, Long 
Beach 

Pacific College Library, Fresno 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



237 



Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Law Library, 
8an Francisco 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Library, San 
Francisco 

Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary 
Library, Berkeley 

Pacific School of Religion Library, 
Berkeley 

Pacific State Hospital, Pomona 

Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Pacific-Union Club Library, San Fran- 
cisco 

Pacific Union College, W. E. Nelson 
Memorial Library, Angwin 

Pacific ; University of the, Library, 
Stockton 

Palestine Institute Library ; Pacific 
School of Religion, Berkeley 

Palomar College Library, San Marcos 

Palo Verde Junior College Library, 
Blythe 

Palo Verde Valley District Library, 
Blythe 

Paramount Pictures Corp., Research Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 

Parsons Company, Research & Develop- 
ment Library ; Ralph W., Pasadena 

Pastoral Counseling Center Library, 
Pasadena ; Southern California School 
of Theology Library, Claremont 

Paul H. Gutman Library of the Sacra- 
mento Co. Society for Medical Im- 
provement, Sacramento 

Paulist Library, San Francisco 

Pendelton ; U.S. Marine Corps Base Li- 
brary, Camp, Oceanside 

Pendleton ; U.S. Naval Hospital Li- 
brary, Oceanside 

Pepperdine College Library ; George, 
Los Angeles 

Philatelic Research Society Library, 
Oakland 

Philco Western Development Labora- 
tories Library, Palo Alto 

Philosophical Research Society, Inc. 
Library, Los Angeles 

Physicians & Surgeons ; College of. Li- 
brary. School of Dentistry, San Fran- 
cisco 

Placer Co. Free Library, Auiurn 

Placer Co. Law Library, Auhurn 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy 

Plumas Co. Law Library, Quincy 

Polk & Co. of California; R. L., Los 
Angeles 

Tomona College, see Associated Col- 
leges, Claremont 

Presidio of Monterey Branch ; U.S. 
Army. Fort Ord Library System, 
Monterey 

Presidio of San Francisco Post Li- 
brary ; U.S. Army, San Francisco 



Press & Union League Club Library, 
San Francisco 

Prosser Library ; Western Personnel 
Institute, James G., Pasadena 

Prudential Insurance Co. of America, 
Business, Recreation & Field Man- 
agement Libraries, Los Angeles 

Queen of Angeles Hospital School of 
Nursing Library, Los Angeles 

Queen of the Holy Rosary College Li- 
brary, Mission San Jose 

R. L. Polk & Co. of California, Los 
Angeles 

RadclifPe Memorial Library ; Loma 
Linda University, Vernier, Loma 
Linda 

Radiation Laboartory Library ; Univer- 
sity of California, Berkeley 

Ralph W. Parsons Company Research 
& Development Library, Pasadena 

Ramo-Wooldridge Library, a division 
of Thompson, Inc., Canoga Park 

Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden Li- 
brary, Claremont 

Rand Corporation Library, Santa Mon- 
ica 

Reedley College Library, Fresno 

Rees-Stealy Medical Clinic Library, 
San Diego 

Rheem Manufacturing Co. Research & 
Development Laboratory Library, 
Downey 

Richfield Oil Corporation, Economic Re- 
search Library, Los Angeles 

Richfield Oil Corporation, Law Library, 
Los Angeles 

Richfield Oil Corporation, Research & 
Development Library, Anaheim 

Richfield Oil Corporation, Technical Li- 
brary, Wilmington 

Riker Laboratories, Inc. Library, North- 
ridge 

Robertshaw-Fulton Control Co., Aero- 
nautical Division, Technical Library, 
Anaheim 

Rodman Library, U.S. Navy, Mare Is- 
land 

Rodman Naval Center Library ; U.S., 
Mare Island 

Rosicrucian Research Library, San 
Jose 

Ryan Aeronautical Co. Engineering Li- 
brary, San Diego 

SafeAvay Stores, Inc. Library Dept., 

Oakland 
St. Alberts College Library, Oakland 
St. Andrews Society Library, San 

Francisco 
St. John's College Library, Camarillo 
Saint John's Hospital Kyser Medical 

Library, Santa Monica 
St. Joseph's College Library, Mountain 

View 



238 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



St. Luke's Hospital Medical Library, 

San Francisco 
St. Mary's Libraries, 8an Francisco 
St. Patrick's Seminary Library, Menlo 

Park 
St. Thomas Aquinas Library, Sacra- 
mento 
St. Vincent's College of Nursing Li- 
brary, Los Angeles 
San Benito College Library, HolUster 
San Benito Co. Free Library, Hollister 
San Benito Co. Law Library, Hollister 
San Fernando Valley State College Li- 
brary, Northridge 
San Francisco Theological Seminary 

Library, San Anselmo 
San Joaquin Co. Free Library, Stockton 
San Joaquin Co. Law Library, Stockton 
San Joaquin General Hospital School 

of Nursing Library, French Camp 
San Joaquin Pioneer Museum & Haggin 

Art Galleries Library, Stockton 
San .Joaquin Valley Information Ser- 
vice, Fresno 
San Mateo Co. Free Library, Belmont 
San Mateo Co. Law Library, Redicood 

City 
Sandford Fleming Library, Berkeley 

Baptist Divinity School, Berkeley 
Santa Barbara College Library ; Univer- 
sity of California, Goleta 
Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 

Jose 
Santa Clara Co. Hospital Medical Li- 
brary, San Jose 
Santa Clara Co. Law Library, San Jose 
Sarah Cecilia Krakowski Memorial Li- 
brary, Pasadena 
Scottish Rite of Free Masonry Library, 

San Francisco 
Scripps College Library, Claremont 
Scripps Institute of Oceanography Li- 
brary ; University of California, San 
Diego, La J oil a 
Scripps Metabolic Clinic Library, La 

Jolla 
Security-First National Bank Research 

Dept. Library, Los Angeles 
Sequoias ; College of the, Library, Vi- 

salia 
Sharp General Depot Post Library ; 

U.S. Army, Lathrop 
Shasta College Library, Redding 
Shasta Co. Free Library, Redding 
Shasta Co. Law Library, Redding 
Shell Agricultural Laboratory Library, 

3Iodesto 
Shell Development Company Library, 

Eme7-yville 
Shell Oil Company Research Library, 

Martinez 
Sierra Club Library, San Francisco 
Sierra College Library, Rocklin 
Sierra Co. Free Library, Quincy 



Sierra Co. Law Library, Downieville 
Simpson Bible College Library, San 

Francisco 
Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka 
Siskiyou Co. Law Library, Yreka 
Siskiyous ; College of the, Weed 
Smiley Public Library ; A. K., Redlands 
Society of California Pioneers Library, 

San Francisco 
Society of Mayflower Descendants Li- 
brary, San Francisco 
Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield 
Solano Co. Law Library, Fairfield 
Solar Aircraft Company, San Diego 
Sonoma Co. Free Library, Santa Rosa 
Sonoma Co. Law Library, Santa Rosa 
Sonoma State College Library, Cotati 
Sonoma State Hospital Library, El- 

dridge 
Sons of the American Revolution ; Cali- 
fornia Society, San Francisco 
Sons of the Revolution Library ; Cali- 
fornia Society, Los Angeles 
Southern California College Library, 

Costa Mesa 
Southern California Edison Co., Los 

Angeles 
Southern California School of Theology 

Library, Claremont 
Southern Pacific Library, San Francisco 
Southern Pacific General Hospital Medi- 
cal Library, San Francisco 
Southwest Museum Library, Los An- 



Southwestern College Library, Chula 
Vista 

Southwestern University Law Library, 
Los Angeles 

Standard Oil Company of California 
Library, San Franisco 

Stanford Research Institute Library, 
Menlo Park 

Stanford Research Institute Library, 
South Pasadena 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Modesto 

Stanislaus Co. Law Library, Modesto 

Stanislaus State College Library, Tur- 
lock 

Starr King School for the Ministry Li- 
brary, Berkeley 

State Chamber of Commerce Library, 
San Francisco 

State Auditor-General Library, Sacra- 
mento 

State Board of Equalization Law Li- 
brary, Sacramento 

State Department of Agriculture, Sacra- 
mento 

State Department of Education Curricu- 
lum Laboratory Library, Sacramento 

State Department of Finance Library, 
Sacramento 

State Division of Mines Library, San 
Francisco 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



239 



State Department of Fish and Game 
and Department of Natural Resources 
Library, Sacramento 

State Department of Mental Hygiene ; 
Neuropsychiatric Institute Library, 
Los Angeles 

State Department of Public Works. Law 
Library, Sacramento 

State Department of Public Works. Di- 
vision of Highways, Bridge Dept., 
Sacramento 

State Department of Public Works. Di- 
vision of Highways, Materials and 
Research Dept. Library, Sacramento 

State Department of Public Works. Di- 
vision of Highways, Planning Survey 
Library, Sacramento 

State Department of Social Welfare, 
Sacramento 

State Department of Water Resources, 
Law and Engineering Library, Sacra- 
mento 

State Federation of Labor Research Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

State Legislative Budget Committee Li- 
brary, Sacramento 

State Legislative Counsel Library, Sac- 
ramento 

Stuart Company Library, Pasadena 

Sunkist Growers, Inc., Research Dept. 
Library, Ontario 

Sunset Magazine Reference Library, 
Menlo Park 

Supreme Court of California Library, 
San Francisco 

Sutro Library, California State Library, 
San Francisco 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuha City 

Sutter Co. Law Library, Yula City 

Swedish Society of San Francisco Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Sylvania Electronic Defense Labora- 
tories Library, Mountain View 

Tahoe-Truckee Community Center Li- 
brary, Truckee 

Tannenbaum Memorial Library ; The 
University of Judaism, Los Angeles 

Technicolor Corp. Research Library, 
Burhank 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red Bluff 

Tehama Co. Law Library, Red Bluff 

Theosopical Society, San Francisco 
Lodge Library, San Francisco 

Thompson, Inc., see Ramo-Wooldridge 
Library, Canoga Park 

Tidewater Associated Oil Co. Research 
and Development Dept. Library, As- 
sociated 

Tracerlab, Inc., Richmond 

Travis Air Force Base; U.S. Mitchell 
Memorial Library, Fairfield 

Treasure Island ; U.S. Naval Station Li- 
brary, San Francisco 



Trinity Co. Free Library, Weaverville 
Trinity Co. Law Library, Weaverville 
Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia 
Tulare Co. Law Library, Visalia 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora 
Tuolumne Co. Law Library, Sonora 
Turco Products Inc., Technical Library, 

Wilmington 
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Co., Re- 
search Library, Los Angeles 

United Air Lines Training Center Li- 
brary, South San Francisco 

U.S. Armed forces installation li- 
braries 
Air Force 

U.S. Air Force Library, Hamilton 
Field 

U.S. Air Force, San Bernardino Air 

Material Area Library. Norton Air 
Force Base, San Bernardino 

U.S. Air Force Technical Library, 
1352d Motion Picture Squadron, 
Lookout Mountain Air Force Sta- 
tion, Los Angeles 

U.S. Air Force 2347th AFRTC Li- 
brary, Long Beach 

U.S. Beale Air Force Base Library, 
Marysville 

U.S. Castle Air Force Base Library, 
Merced 

U.S. Edwards Air Force Base Li- 
brary, Edwards Field 

U.S. Fifteenth Air Force Headquar- 
ters Library, March Field 

U.S. George Air Force Base Library, 
Victorville 

U.S. McClellan Air Force Base; 
SMAMA Library, McClellan Field 

U.S. March Air Force Base, Post and 
Technical Library, March Field 

U.S. Mather Air Force Base Library, 
Mather Field 

U.S. Mitchell Memorial Library, Tra- 
vis Air Force Base, Fairfield 

U.S. Sixth Air Force Reserve Region 
Headquarters, Western Regional 
Reference Library, Hamilton Field 

U.S. Vandenberg Air Force Base Li- 
brary, Lompoc 

Army 

U.S. Army Branch Disciplinary Bar- 
racks Post Library, Lompoc 

U.S. Army. Fort Baker Branch Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

U.S. Army. Fort Irwin Post Library, 
Barstow 

U.S. Army. Fort Mason Post Library, 
San Francisco 

U.S. Army. Fort MacArthur Library 
System, San Pedro 

U.S. Army. Fort Ord Library System. 
Presidio of Monterey Branch, Mon- 
terey 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



U.S. Army. Fort Ord Library System. 

Hospital Branch Library, Fort Ord 
U.S. Army. Fort Ord Library System. 

Durham Branch Library, Fort Ord 
U.S. Army. Fort Ord Library System, 

Fort Ord 
U.S. Army. Fort Winfield Scott 

Branch Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Army Language School, Research 

Library, Monterey 
U.S. Army Letterman General Hospi- 
tal Post and Patients Library, San 

Francisco 
U.S. Army Letterman General Hospi- 
tal Medical Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Army. Oakland Army Terminal 

Post Library, Oakland 
U.S. Army. Presidio of San Francisco 

Post Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Army. Sharp General Depot Post 

Library, Lathrop 
U.S. Army. 6th U.S. Army Library 

and Library Depot, San Francisco 
U.S. Army. Transportation Corps, 

Post Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Army. Two Rock Ranch Post 

Library, Petaluma 

Marine Corps 

U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Li- 
brary, El Toro, Santa Ana 

U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot Li- 
brary, San Diego 

U.S. Marine Corps Supply Forward- 
ing Annex, Special Services Li- 
brary, San Francisco 

Navy 

U.S. Naval Air Station Library, 
Point Mugu 

U.S. Naval Air Station, Main Bar- 
racks Library, Alameda 

U.S. Naval Air Station, North Island 
Library, San Diego 

U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Lab- 
oratory Library, Port Hueneme 

U.S. Naval Construction Battalion 
Center Library, Port Hueneme 

U.S. Naval Construction Equipment 
Dept. Library, Port Hueneme 

U.S. Naval Hospital Library, Oak- 
land 

U.S. Naval Hospital Library. Medical 
Library, Oakland 

U.S. Naval Hospital Medical and Sta- 
tion Libraries, San Diego 

U.S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory Li- 
brary, Corona 

U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station 
Library, China Lake 

U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station 
Library, Technical Library, China 
Lake 

U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station, 
Pasadena Annex, Technical Li- 
brary, Pasadena 



U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Li- 
brary, Monterey 
U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Lab- 
oratory Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Naval Schools, Civil Engineer 
Corps OflBcers Library, Port Hue- 
neme 
U.S. Naval Shipyard Technical Li- 
brary, Mare Island 
U.S. Naval Station Library, Terminal 

Island, Long Beach 
U.S. Naval Station Library, Treasure 

Island, San Francisco 
U.S. Naval Supply Center, Library, 

Oakland 
U.S. Naval Supply Center. Industrial 
Relations Department Library, 
Oakland 
U.S. Naval Training Center Library, 

San Diego 
U.S. Navy Electronics Laboratory Li- 
brary, San Diego 
U.S. Navy, Eleventh Naval District 

Headquarters Library, San Diego 
U.S. Navy Rodman Library, Mare 

Island 
U.S. Navy Training School Library, 

San Francisco 
U.S. Navy. Twelfth Naval District 
Public Works Office, Technical Li- 
brary. Naval District, San Bruno 
U.S. Attorney's Law Library, Los An- 
geles 
U.S. Bureau of Mines, San Francisco 
Petroleum Research Laboratory, San 
Francisco 
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Regional 

Library, Sacramento 
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Delta Dis- 
trict Library, Stockton 
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Ninth 

Circuit Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Western Re- 
gional Research Library, Albany 
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Office of Field 

Services Library, San Francisco 
U.S. Geological Survey Library, Menlo 

Park Section, Menlo Park 
U.S. Geological Survey Water Re- 
sources Branch Library, Los Angeles 
Universal Pictures Co., Inc., Research 

Dept. Library, Universal City 
University of California, San Diego, La 

Jolla 
University of California, Santa Bar- 
bara, Goleta 
University of California. Citrus Re- 
search and Agricultural Experiment 
Station Library, Riverside 
University of California. Institute of 
Transportation and Traffic Engineer- 
ing Library, Richmond 
University of California San Francisco 
Medical Center Library, San Fran- 
cisco 



VOLUME 57, NO. I, WINTER, 1 962 



241 



University of California, see also Berke- 
ley, Davis, Los Angeles, Riverside 
and San Francisco 

University of Southern California, Los 
Angeles 

University of Southern California, 
School of Dentistry, Los Angeles 

University of Southern California, 
School of Law Library, Los Angeles 

University of Southern California, 
School of Medicine Library, Los An- 
geles 

Vandenberg Air Force Base Library ; 
U.S., Lompoc 

Varian Associates Library, Palo Alto 

Vauclain Home Library, Ban Diego 

Vernier RadclifEe Memorial Library ; 
Loma Linda University, Loma Linda 

Veterans Administration Libraries, Fa- 
cilities see Fresno, Long Beach, Liv- 
ermore, Los Angeles, Oakland, Palo 
Alto, San Fernando, 8an Francisco, 
Sepulveda 

Veterans Administration Regional Ofl5ce 
Medical Library, San Francisco 

Vogdes Library of Geology and Paleon- 
tology ; Natural History Museum Li- 
brary, General H. W., San Diego 

Van KleinSmid Library of World Af- 
fairs ; University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles 

W. E. Nelson Memorial Library ; Pa- 
cific Union College, Angicin 

Walt Disney Productions Library, Bur- 
iank 

Wells Fargo-American Trust Bank Li- 
brary, San Francisco 



Wells Fargo Bana-..^. ican Trust 

Company, History Room, San Fran- 
cisco 

Welwood Murray Memorial Library, 
Palm Springs 

Western Baptist Bible College Library, 
El Cerrito 

Western Gear Corporation Engineering 
Library, Lynivood 

Western Jewish Institute Library, Los 
Angeles 

Western Pacific Railroad Co., Freight 
Traffic Department Library, San 
Francisco 

Western Personnel Institute, .James G. 
Prosser Library, Pasadena 

Western Oil & Gas Association Library, 
Los Angeles 

Western Precipitation Corp. Library, 
Los Angeles 

Westmont College Library, Santa Bar- 
iara 

White Memorial Medical Library, Loma 
Linda University, Los Angeles 

Wine Institute Library, San Francisco 

Winfield Scott Branch Library; U.S. 
Army, San Francisco 

World Affairs Council of Northern Cali- 
fornia Library, San Francisco 

World Trade Center Libraries of the 
San Francisco World Trade Center 
Authority, San Francisco 

Yolo Co. Free Library, Woodland 
Yolo Co. Law Library, Woodland 
Y'uba College Libraries, Marysville 



242 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



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NmCi 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 




I 



CALIFORNIA STATE 
LIBRARY STAFF 

■ Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, 

State Lihrarian 

m Mrs. Phyllis I. Dalton, 

Assistant State LibraTian 

■ Arlene Hope, Principal Lihra- 

rian, Library Consultant 
Services 
m Florence E. Billet, 

Library Consultant 

■ Shirley Brother, 

Library Consultant 
u M. Virginia Hughes, 

Library Consultant 
m Margaret J. Ward, 

Library Consultant 
u Barbara L. Wynn, 

Library Consultant 
m Carleton W. Kenyon, 

Law Librarian 
m Constance E. Lee, Principal 
Librarian, Reader Services 
m Mrs. Mabel Chorley, 
Circidation Section 

■ Richard H. Dillon, 

Sutro Library 

■ Allan R. Ottley, 

California Section 
u Eugene L. Pike, 

Reference Section 
m Mary E. Schell, Government 

Publications Section 

■ Mrs. Virginia S. Simpson, 

Books for the Blind 
Section 

■ Melvin C. Oathout, Principal 

Librarian, Technical Services 

■ Alexander T. Birrell, 

Catalog Section 

■ Mrs. Elisabeth Bruno, 

Union Catalog Unit 

■ Mrs. Hildur E. Howe, 

Processing Center 

■ Edith A. Irwin, 

Periodicals Section 
u Thomas J. Brooks, 
P?-ocfc'ssmg Center 

■ Margaret E. Preston, 

Order Section 

■ Mrs. Avis Smith, 

Book Repair Section 

■ Harlo Whipple, Property 

and Shipping Section 

EDITOR: Mrs. Natalie D. Smith 

California State Library, 
P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento 9 
Issued quarterly in the interest of 
the libraries of the State by the 
California State Library. 
Entered as second-class matter 
December 1913, at the post office 
at Sacramento, California, under 
the act of August 24, 1912. 
Accepted for mailing at the spe- 
cial rate of postage provided for 
in Section 1103, Act of October 
3, 1917, auth. August 27, 1918. 



news notes 
of 

California 
libraries 

Yol. 57, No. 2, Spring, 1962 



CONTENTS 

Affiliated Libraries in California, by 
Dorothy Sinclair 

Borrowing From Other Libraries, by 
Carleton Kenyon 



Page 
_ 247 

_ 281 



Note: Abstracted in LIBRARY 
SCIENCE ABSTRACTS 



printed in California state printing office 



AFFILIATED LIBRARIES IN CALIFORNIA 

By DOROTHY SINCLAIR 

Coordinator of Adult Services 
Enoch Pratt Free Library 
Baltimore, Maryland 



( 247 ) 



248 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAKIES 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 249 

I. Materials Supplied to Affiliated Libraries 251 

II. Services Given to Affiliated Libraries 253 

III. Capital Outlay and Contributions to Operating Costs 255 

IV. Cost Factors in the Affiliated Relationship 256 

V. Affiliation as a Type of Library System 261 

VI. Relationships Among Librarians 265 

VII. Librarians' Evaluation of Affiliation 266 

VIII. G-eographic Considerations 270 

IX. Summary of Findings by Type of Affiliate 271 

X. Summary of Findings by Size of Affiliate 274 

XL General Conclusion 276 



TABLES 

Page 

I. Affiliated Libraries by Type and Population 250 

II. Books Provided to Affiliates by County 252 

III. Circulation of County-Owned Books in Affiliated Libraries 253 

IV. Services Given by County Libraries to Affiliates 254 

V. Money Payments in Affiliated Relationships 255 

VI. Other Contributions (Capital and Operating) 256 

VII. Contracts for Affiliated Library Service 256 

VIII. Knowledge of Arrangement by City Officials 257 

IX. Knowledge of Arrangement by General Public 257 

X. Does Affiliated Library Get Its Money's Worth? Opinions 

of City and County Librarians 258 

XL Service Necessary if Affiliate Were a Branch 260 

XII. "System Sentiment" of City Librarians 262 

XIII. Attendance at County Meetings — City Librarian and Staff 263 

XIV. City Librarians Wishing to Change Statistical Listing 263 

XV. Relationships Among Librarians 265 

XVI. Professionally Trained Librarians in Affiliates 266 

XVII. Chief Problem Met by City Librarians 266 

XVIII. Chief Problem Met by County Librarians 267 

XIX. Greatest Advantage — Opinions of City and County 268 

XX. Views on Desirability of Continuing Relationship 269 

XXI. Geographic Distribution of Affiliated Libraries 270 



VOLUME <^^, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 249 



INTRODUCTION 



The word "affiliated" has a special meaning when applied to public 
libraries in California. As commonly used in this State, and as used 
in this paper, it applies to a specific financial relationship between 
a municipal library and a county free library. A municipal library 
is said to be "affiliated" when residents of a city or district in which 
the library is located pay for county library service in the same manner 
as do residents of the unincorporated area, and in addition support 
an established local library. An affiliated library is a municipal or dis- 
trict library in every legal sense of the word, having been established 
by the duly constituted authorities. It is also, from both legal and 
financial viewpoints, a part of the county library system. The term 
"affiliated" as used here does not apply to cities or districts that con- 
tract with county or other libraries for additional services. 

At the time this study was made there were 40 affiliated libraries in 
the State of California, connected with 18 county library systems. Of 
the 18, 16 were county libraries of the usual type, and two were county- 
wide systems served through contract with municipal libraries. For 
purposes of this study, a municipal library serving a whole county 
directly has not been considered to be an affiliated library. 

Historically, there are three ways in which a municipal or district 
library may become affiliated with a county library. First and most 
frequent is the situation in which the municipal library existed before 
the formation of the county library system. Of the existing 40 affiliated 
libraries, 23 fall into this category and will be referred to as "prior" 
affiliates. They are usually found in cities which maintained public 
libraries for some years before the foundation of the county library. 
At the time of the development of county libraries in California, which 
took place chiefly in the second and third decades of this century, 
these libraries cast their lot with the newly formed larger unit. For 
one reason or another, however, the cities and districts did not wish 
to merge altogether into the new system, but maintained their separate 
existence, while at the same time sharing the benefits of the new 
service. 

Not all city libraries that existed before the coming of the county 
library movement made this decision. A number disestablished their 
own libraries and cast their lot completely with the new county service. 
A few others became affiliated during the early stages of the county 
library, but gradually merged into the county system. Some have 
remained independent. 



250 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



A second manner in which an affiliated library may come into exist- 
ence is through the development of self -consciousness in a growing city 
or community previously served as a branch of a county free library. 
The newly incorporated or larger city wishes to add additional library 
services to those it receives from the county system. While not wanting 
to withdraw altogether, it establishes a municipal library, levies a tax 
or makes an appropriation, and thenceforth maintains an affiliated 
library. There were four such affiliates at the time of the study (hence- 
forth to be called ''emergent" affiliates). 

A third type exists only in those counties in which the county library 
service is given by a city library under contract, and for which pay- 
ment is made from the county general fund. In such cases, existing 
small city libraries (other than the large one which gives the total 
service) are involuntarily affiliated according to our definition. That 
is, as they all contribute to the general fund from which the county 
librar}^ appropriation is made, they are automatically supporting the 
county library in addition to their own municipal or district libraries. 
These libraries are thus genuine affiliated libraries, although involun- 
tary affiliates under our definition. 



TABLE 



AFFILIATED LIBRARIES BY TYPE AND POPULATION 



Type 


Under 3000 
Population 


3001-10,000 


Over 10,000 


Total 


Prior 

Emergent 


9 
1 
3 


8 

2 

5 


6 

1 
5 


23 
4 
13 






Total 


13 


15 


12 


40 



Three other affiliates, though not placed in a separate category in 
the discussions and tabulations to follow, should be mentioned sepa- 
rately at the outset, because their structure makes it unnecessary or 
inappropriate to include them in some tables at all. The three are 
jointly operated affiliates and county libraries. Their special situation 
will be described later. 

It has been known for some time that affiliated libraries might repaj^ 
studj^, and the increasing emphasis on library sj^'stems in recent years 
has made the need for that study more urgent. Affiliates have existed 
for a long time. Details of the relationship vary widely, so much so 
that the California Public Library Commission's questionnaire on this 
subject did not reveal enough of a pattern to justify more than tenta- 
tive conclusions. The General Report stated: "A more intensive study 
of 'affiliation' with the county library than is here reported needs to 
be made . . ." ^ 



1 California. Public Library Commission. Reports. (Berkeley, 1958) p. 59. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPEING, 1 962 251 

The present study may not supply fully the need mentioned by the 
commission's report, but it does attempt to give additional data about 
the nature of affiliation. The information it contains was gained chiefly 
from personal interviews with all city and county librarians concerned. 
These interviews took place during the year and a half from the summer 
of 1959 through December of 1960. Supplementary statistical informa- 
tion (primarily concerned with book collections and circulation) came 
from the 1959/60 annual reports of the same libraries, as submitted to 
the State Library. Population groupings are based on the 1960 census. 



I. MATERIALS SUPPLIED TO AFFILIATED LIBRARIES 

All affiliated libraries receive some materials from the county li- 
braries. These come in two ways, requests and shipments. Request 
service to affiliates is given by all county libraries studied, and in nine 
cases, books sent on request are the only ones received by the affiliated 
libraries. Eight affiliates receiving no shipments are of the involuntary 
type. 

Regular shipments are received by 28 affiliates. A few represent 
permanent or semi-permanent allotments, but most are more or less 
temporary. Frequency varies a great deal, but monthly shipments are 
most common. In one case, shipments are sent twice a week; the least 
frequent shipment found was an annual one. Books sent on shipment 
are usually selected for the affiliate by the county. In only five cases 
did the city librarian make the selection. However, in 10 other cases, 
the affiliated library indicated types of books needed. In several others, 
the city librarian has the privilege of indicating categories wanted, 
but did not ordinarily do so. One city librarian reported an attempt 
to select books for shipment, but this effort was discouraged by the 
county librarian, who felt that the city would monopolize the new 
books. 

In 12 cases where the county selected books for shipment, duplication 
of titles was found to be a problem. That is, the city bad already pur- 
chased books received by shipment. Normally, unwanted duplicates are 
returned. In four cases, the county library sends an invoice of proposed 
shipments for the city to check, thus avoiding duplication. In two other 
cases, the county sends the city a list of its new books, and the city 
indicates those it is ordering or has. 

Thirteen affiliated libraries receive some periodicals from the county, 
and four receive newspapers. One shares the films received as a part of 
the film circuit membership of the county. 

Four city libraries receive money for books instead of or in addition 
to shipments, and three receive money for magazines. 

2—60914. 



252 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



The percentage of the total collection of an affiliated library supplied 
by the county varies widely. Figures were not available for all the 
affiliates. Altogether, over 270,000 volumes from county libraries are 
located in affiliated libraries, and this figure does not appear to fluctu- 
ate a great deal, even though the books themselves move from outlet 
to outlet. 



TABLE II. BOOKS PROVIDED TO AFFILIATES BY COUNTY IN 
PROPORTION TO TOTAL AVAILABLE COLLECTION IN CITY 



A. By Type of Affiliate 



Percent 


0-10 


11-20 


21-30 


31-40 


41-50 


51-60 


61-70 


71-80 


81-90 


91-100 


Total 






Prior 


-- 


2 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1 


3 


2 


1 


m 


Emergent 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


2 


1 


4 


Involuntary 


3 


1 


2 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1 


1=8 


Totals 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


4 


1 


3 


4 


3 


28 



* Two jointly operated libraries omitted. Four others gave no figures. 
'• Five gave no figures. 



B. By Population 


Group of AflFiliate Library 
















0-10 


11-20 


21-30 


31-40 


41-50 


51-60 


61-70 


71-80 


81-90 


91-100 


Total 






Under 3000 popula- 
tion 




2 




1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


1 


=9 


3001-10,000 popula- 
tion 


4 




1 


1 




1 




2 


1 


1 


dll 


10,001 and over 


-- 


1 


2 


1 


-- 


2 


-- 


1 


1 


1 


eg 


Totals 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


4 


1 


3 


4 


3 


29 



<= Figures not available for four libraries. 

^ One joint operation omitted. All books supplied by county; figures not available for tbree libraries. 

® Figures not available for three libraries. 



Circulation of county books from affiliated libraries (incomplete 
figures) accounts for over 700,000 items circulated. A comparison of 
percentage of circulation with percentage of county books held reveals 
that county books account for relatively less circulation than their 
proportion in the collections might lead one to expect. Possible reasons 
for this disparity, revealed in the interviews were: (1) inaccuracy of 
inventory figures ; inclusion in county records of many books not actu- 
ally in the affiliated library, (2) tendency of the county to send older 
books, (3) reference books supplied by the county, (4) more substan- 
tial books supplied by the county; more popular but ephemeral ones 
bought by the city, (5) separation in the affiliated library of the two 
collections, with county books less easily found. This type of separation 
is not common, but was found occasionally. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 



253 



TABLE III. CIRCULATION OF COUNTY-OWNED BOOKS IN AFFILIATED 
LIBRARIES IN PROPORTION TO TOTAL CITY CIRCULATION FROM CITY 

A. By Type of Affiliate 



Percent 


0-iO 


11-20 


21-30 


31-40 


41-50 


51-60 


61-70 


71-80 


81-90 


91-100 


Total 


Prior 


2 


3 


-- 


6 


__ 


1 


-_ 


3 


_- 


2 


^17 


Emergent 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


b2 


Involuntary 


3 


3 


1 


-- 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1 


"9 


Totals 


6 


6 


1 


6 


1 


2 


- 


3 


- 


3 


28 



» Figures not available for six libraries. 
•• Figures not available for two libraries. 
■= Figures not available for four libraries. 



B. By Population 


Grou 


p of Affiliate Library 
















0-10 


11-20 


21-30 


31-40 


41-50 


51-60 


61-70 


71-80 


81-90 


91-100 


Total 






Under 3,000 popula- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




1 




1 


dg 






3001-10,000 popula- 
tion 


4 


3 


.. 


2 




1 




1 


.. 


1 


el2 


10,000 and over 


1 


2 


-- 


2 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1 




1 


'7 


Totals 


6 


6 


1 


6 


1 


2 


- 


3 


- 


3 


28 



* Figures not available for four libraries. 

* Figures not available for three libraries. 

* Figures not available for five libraries. 



In only three city libraries is a nonresident fee charged for the bor- 
rowing of city-owned books by county borrowers. A number of others 
require separate registration. 



II. SERVICES GIVEN TO AFFILIATED LIBRARIES 

Requests 

Eequest service, as indicated above, is the basic service given to all 
affiliates. In many cases, books sent on request remain in the affiliated 
library unless recalled to fill another request. This type of book sup- 
plement is the only one received by those affiliates not receiving regular, 
shipments. 

Quality of the request service varies. Several city librarians com- 
plained of delays, and others were concerned because new books were 
recalled too soon. On the other hand, a number of city librarians praised 
the request service. Eight mentioned that telephone service was avail- 
able, and several spoke of daily rush request services. Most affiliates 
have their State Library requests handled by the county libraries, as 
a natural followup of the original service. 



254 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES 



Processing 

There is some evidence that processing of city books is beginning to 
be offered to affiliates. This service is now given in full to five cities 
by the county libraries concerned ; one has made a beginning with 
ordering service, and intends to offer full processing soon. Another 
plans to give full processing as soon as duplicating equipment is 
received. 

In three cases, it was reported that the county library offered to 
process affiliates' books, but without success. In three others, the service 
given in the past had been discontinued. Interviews with the city 
librarians concerned in all these failures tend to indicate that a larger 
measure of success might still be possible with fuller communication. 
Fear of loss of independence in book selection was expressed several 
times. 



Catalog Cards with Shipments 

Most county libraries provide affiliates with catalog cards for county 
books sent on shipment. Several affiliates brought out problems con- 
nected with this service. Nine said the sets of cards were not complete, 
and several made additional cards. Author and title cards are sent 
in some cases, shelflist card in others. Three city libraries do not use 
or file the cards sent, mentioning the time consumed in filing and 
withdrawing cards for books likely to be recalled. Four cities file the 
city cards separately. 

Advice and Consultation 

City librarians were asked whether they receive advisory service from 
the county library staff or whether it is the county library staff to 
which they would first turn for advice and consultation in case of 
need. Twelve receive such advice as a normal part of their service, and 
12 others would turn to the county library for consultation. Thirteen 
would consult with other city librarians with more comparable prob- 
lems. 

The following table shows the distribution of the services most com- 
monly offered : 



TABLE IV. SERVICES GIVEN BY COUNTY LIBRARY TO AFFILIATES 





Advisory 
and consultative 


Processing 


Catalog cards 
with county books 


Request 




12 


«6 


29 


37 








b25 


31 


8 








Totals 


"37 


■=37 


■=37 


"37 







» Three omitted, as joint operations are involved. 

•> Includes one case of ordering only. 

" Twelve of these would ask county library staff if advice or consultation were needed. 



VOLUME '^^'J, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 

Other types of service mentioned were as follows : 

Children's service 

Summer reading club materials 7 

Children's librarians' visit to city schools '. 2 

Story telling 1 

Public relations 

National Library Week 5 

General publicity (newspaper, displays, etc.) 6 

Mending of city books 6 

Centralized overdues 1 



255 



I. CAPITAL OUTLAY AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
OPERATING COSTS 

Very little in the way of capital assistance is given by county li- 
braries to affiliates. In a few cases, furniture and equipment are sup- 
plied, in most instances used furniture and shelving. In only three 
cases did the county library make a substantial contribution toward 
the purchase of new furniture, and these three were the joint city- 
county libraries, where county contributions probably exceeded those 
of the three cities. 

Buildings are supplied by all affiliated cities, and maintenance and 
utilities costs are commonly a city responsibility. Some affiliates have 
new and quite attractive buildings, and the great majority have build- 
ings better than the county would be able to furnish. 

In eight instances county libraries supplied staff to affiliates, the 
entire staff in three cases. In 21 cases money was supplied to the 
affiliated libraries, most frequently in the form of salary supplements. 
These are sometimes paid directly to the staff member, sometimes to the 
city for salary purposes. The city librarian's salary is most frequently 
supplemented ; the payment is often looked on as a " branch librarian 's ' ' 
salary and is related to the county's scale for such positions. Of the 
nine other cases of money payment, six are not earmarked and three 
are considered to be "rent" for the use of a part of the city building 
as a county ' ' branch. ' ' 

In four cases, cities paid money to the county library, in each case to 
be repaid to the city librarian (who in these instances is a county em- 
ployee) as salary. 



TABLE V. MONEY PAYMENTS IN AFFILIATED RELATIONSHIPS 





Salary supplements (for City Librarian) 


Rent 


Unallocated 




All 


M to all 


Under H 


3 




County to City 


1 


5 


6 


6 


City to County 


1 




3 







256 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



TABLE VI. OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS (CAPITAL AND 
OPERATING) TO AFFILIATES 





Supplied 
by city only 


Supplied 
by county only 


Supplied 
by both 


Furniture and equipment 


29 




«11 


Staff 


32 


3 


5 







a County contribution substantial in the case of the three jointly operated afBllates. 



IV. COST FACTORS IN THE AFFILIATED RELATIONSHIP 

A complete investigation of the costs involved in this relationship 
would require two kinds of information not available for this study. It 
would be necessary to know the exact financial contribution of each 
city to the county library operation, a fact impossible to ascertain in 
all but a few cases. Equally essential would be a knowledge of the 
dollar value of all the central services and contributions of the counties, 
as related to each affiliate, and the value of the cities' individual serv- 
ices to the unincorporated areas served. Lack of these facts is the most 
serious weakness not only of this study, but also quite possibly of the 
relationship itself. 

There is obviously more likelihood that these facts will be considered 
where a formal contract exists. Fourteen written agreements are cur- 
rently in effect between cities and counties for affiliated library service, 
including one case in which the interests of two involuntary affiliates 
are considered in the general city-county contract negotiated annually. 



TABLE VII. CONTRACTS FOR AFFILIATED LIBRARY SERVICE 



Type of affiliate 


Under 

3,000 

population 


Percent 


3,001- 

10,000 

population 


Percent 


10,000 

and over 

population 


Percent 


Total 


Percent 


Prior 


2 


22.2 


4 


50 


5 


83.3 


11 


47.8 


Emergent 


1 


100 














1 


25 


Involuntary 














a2 


40 


2 


15.4 


Total 


3 


23.1 


4 


26.6 


7 


58.3 


14 


35 



Affiliates included in city-county contract for county service. 



As might be expected, the proportion of contracts increases with the 
size of the city. There are more contracts, and a higher percentage, 
among affiliates established prior to county libraries than in the other 
types, but it is important to remember that only four affiliates of the 
emergent type exist and that only two counties are involved in the 
involuntary type of relationship. One of the emergent affiliates receives 
a very close financial accounting annually from the county, without a 
formal contract. Details of this accounting represent a major problem 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 



257 



to the county librarian and officials, for several reasons. One difficulty 
is that the exact sum in county library tax to be paid by the city in a 
given year is not known until very late in the year, and yet the county 
library's service during that year is expected by both sides to approxi- 
mate this unknown sum. Another arrangement which also involves 
somewhat close financial calculation, with a contract, avoids this diffi- 
culty by using the amount paid by the city to the county library fund 
in the previous year. 

Official Attitudes in Affiliafed Cities 

The small number of contracts is probably related to official attitudes 
toward the relationship. The officials most often involved are boards of 
trustees, although in a number of cases, especially where there are con- 
tracts, city manager, council members and others are active. 

Of the official bodies concerned, 11 (or individual members thereof) 
are believed to know and approve of the relationship in its financial 
aspects. Sixteen are believed to take little interest, and 14 to question 
the equity of the arrangement. These questions do not necessarily 
involve serious doubts. Some officials have expressed surprise at what 
seems to them an odd arrangement, and wish to learn more about it. 
Where official interest is lacking, librarians often state that their own 
assurance of the value of the arrangement is accepted. 



TABLE VIII. KNOWLEDGE OF ARRANGEMENT BY CITY OFFICIALS 





By type of affiliate 


By population 




Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


3,000 
and under 


3,001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


Know and approve 


9 


1 


1 


3 


5 


3 


11 


Not interested 


9 


1 


6 


7 


6 


3 


16 


Question 


6 


2 


6 


2 


5 


7 


14 


Totals 


a04 


4 


13 


12 


^6 


13 


a41 



* One city librarian Indicated varying answers for officials. 



The general public is normally aware, at least in part, of the exist- 
ence of some relationship. Few understand the legal and financial 
details. Most of those with some knowledge know simply that they can 
obtain books from both libraries. 



TABLE IX. KNOWLEDGE OF ARRANGEMENT BY GENERAL PUBLIC 





Yes • 


No 


Partly 


Totals 


Knowledge of relationship 


3 


7 


30 


a37 






Aware of legal & financial aspects 


2 


32 


6 


40 







* Jointly operated libraries omitted. 



258 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Value of Services Related fo City's Contribution 

Both city and county librarians were asked whether, in their opinion, 
the affiliated library received its money's worth in service and contri- 
butions from the county library. It must be clearly understood that 
the tables to follow represent not facts but librarians' opinions. The 
interviews revealed that there was great variation in the information— 
or lack of information — on which these opinions were based. Some 
librarians, in the smaller cities especially, were confused about affilia- 
tion and were not aware of the city contribution to the county library 
fund, and therefore, of course, had no idea of its extent. Some librar- 
ians who were uninformed were relative newcomers to their positions. 
Several more or less informed guesses were offered, usually recognized 
as such by the librarians making them. In general, county librarians 
appeared more informed than city librarians, although there were some 
with a good understanding of the situation among the latter. 



TABLE X. DOES AFFILIATED LIBRARY GET ITS MONEY'S WORTH? 
A. Opinions of City Librarians 





By Type 




By Population 






Prior 


Emergent 


Invol. 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10000 


Over 
10001 


Totals 


Yes. 


14 


3 


6 


10 


8 


5 


23 


No 


3 


-- 


3 


-- 


4 


2 


6 


Not Sure» 


3 


1 


4 


3 


2 


3 


8 


Totals 


b20 


4 


13 


13 


bi4 


blO 


b37 



B. Opinions of 


County L 


brarians 














By Type 


By Population 




Prior 


Emergent 


Invol. 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10000 


Over 
10001 


Totals 


Yes 


18 


4 


__ 


8 


8 


6 


22 


No 


5 


-- 


13 


5 


7 


6 


18 






Not Sure" 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


Totals 


23 


4 


13 


13 


15 


12 


40 



" "Not sure" means that the librarian concerned was not sure whether affiliates received value for their con- 
tribution to the county library fund, and does not necessarily indicate lacli of certainty of the financial 
facts. On the other hand, many who answered Yes or No were "Not sure" of the facts. 

'' The three joint city-county librarians' opinions are given in the table below, under county librarians. 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 259 

The most notable difference in the responses of the two types of 
librarians is the tendency of the county librarians to say "No" and 
the reluctance of city librarians to do so. The latter are more frequently 
"not sure," the former have a decided opinion one way or the other. 

According to these responses, over half the city and county librarians 
alike believe the financial burden is fairly equitable. It is noteworthy 
that the two county librarians with involuntary affiliates believe it is 
not. This response perhaps needs clarification, as in both cases more is 
involved than a county library-affiliate relationship. In each case a 
central city not only gives the countywide service, under contract, but 
also contributes to this service through the contribution of its citizens 
to the General Fund from which the contract payment is made. The 
inequity reported therefore may refer not only to the situation of the 
affiliated cities, but also to that of the city giving the general service. 

Both city and county librarians who felt they were not receiving or 
giving full value were inclined to elaborate. Several city librarians 
knew they could receive more from the county, but for various reasons 
did not wish to. Some could have more books, but wanted different types 
of books from those available; one, for instance, wanted business and 
technical books of a type not included in the county 's shipments to any 
outlet. Several wanted new and popular books in greater numbers than 
the county could afford to buy without limiting its purchases of more 
substantial materials. Some who turned down offers of processing 
wanted fuller cataloging or faster service than they felt they could 
get from the county. One used a different classification. Advisory serv- 
ices, visits from county personnel, assistance in weeding, attendance 
at county meetings, and other common headquarters services given by 
county libraries to their outlets were felt by a number of affiliates to 
be unnecessary or inappropriate. 

The county librarians were aware in most cases of these problems. 
They naturally placed a higher value on their own services and felt that 
they might be useful to affiliates. However, they did on occasion recog- 
nize that what was needed by affiliates was beyond their normal service 
pattern. They could not meet these needs without crippling existing 
branch or headquarters services. County librarians also felt in some 
cases that further communication and explanation might result in a 
more equitable arrangement. Several were making efforts along these 
lines ; others had to postpone them because of lack of time. 



Sety'\ces Needed If Affiliates Did Not Exist 

Because of the cost factor, it is natural to inquire, "What if there 
were no affiliate?" What if the city were merely contributing, as it 
now does, to the support of the county library? How much service 
would it receive, as compared with what is now given ? 

County librarians answered this (perhaps awkward) question 
thoughtfully and frankly. As the affiliates would in almost every case 
represent large county branch outlets, among the largest in each county, 
they would have to be supplied with services and materials at least 
equal to those of the largest existing branches, if no municipal library 
existed. 



260 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBEARIES 



TABLE XI. AMOUNT OF SERVICE AND MATERIALS NECESSARY IF 
AFFILIATE WERE A BRANCH (COUNTY LIBRARIANS' REPLIES) 





Type of affiliate 


Population group 




Prior 


Emergent 


Invol. 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Totals 


Would give more 
than given now 


16 


2 


10 


6 


13 


9 


28 


Couldn't match 
present combined 
resources and/or 
would need more 
money from county 
to give needed 
service 


(14) 


- 


(2) 


(6) 


(4) 


(6) 


(16) 


Would give the 
same as now 


6 


2 


3 


7 


1 


3 


11 


Totals 


=>22 


4 


13 


13 


al4 


12 


^39 



* One library omitted, because It is a joint operation whose entire current budget comes from county sources. 



Some of the same factors were brought out in discussion of this ques- 
tion as were mentioned in connection with financial relationships. Serv- 
ing the present affiliate as a branch would be part of the normal 
county library operation, and thus cost less in some ways than excep- 
tional treatment. However, hours of service, number of books, number 
and quality of staff, and building requirements would present serious 
problems to many county librarians, were they expected to give total 
library service to the affiliated communities. A number felt such service 
would be impossible without additional funds, and a good many de- 
clared that they could not possibly give the cities what they now receive 
from both sources. 

Most county librarians, in considering this matter, were not so much 
concerned to give the affiliated city a service commensurate with its 
tax (or General Fund) contribution, as to equate the service with the 
population and needs of the community. This view is, of course, the 
normal one for most officials giving public service over an area; such 
services as police and health protection, for example, are given accord- 
ing to need and not apportioned from area to area according to their 
relative contributions to the budget. Thus, even those county librarians 
who believe their affiliates are in fact receiving their money's worth 
from the county would, in some cases, expect and wish to give more to 
the same communities if they were branch libraries. 

Thus the situation for the majority of affiliates is an odd one. They 
are now operating libraries whose resources and services (from both 
sources combined) are superior to those they would have as county 
branches. At the same time, they are receiving from the county less 
than they would receive if they were branches, even in those cases where 
a contract or accounting agreement has assured them of value for their 
contribution. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 261 

As might be expected, those affiliates whicli would receive approxi- 
mately the same service as they now do are most often in the smaller 
population group. 



V. AFFILIATION AS A TYPE OF LIBRARY SYSTEM 

Considered as a form of library system, affiliation falls midway be- 
tween the "consolidated" and "co-operative" types. Insofar as the 
affiliates are a part of the county library — through their payment 
toward its support — the relationship resembles a one-library system. 
Insofar as they are independent and autonomous, the system is more 
like a co-operative or federated type. 

In actual practice, the relationship comes closer to one or the other 
of the system concepts on the basis of several factors. Traditional and 
personal relationships are important here. For example, the librarians 
of some affiliates were formerly branch librarians for the county librar- 
ies.^ In such cases, knowledge of what is available and a natural ten- 
dency to look for advice and even supervision to headquarters tends to 
make the relationship more like that of county librarian and branch. 
The size of the affiliate is also a factor, with smaller affiliates normally 
more dependent. Such centralized, or semicentralized, administration 
as exists occurs in situations of this type. 

Factors that lead toward separatism include : city-county tensions 
in areas other than library service, with resulting tendency to scrutinize 
any relationship ; existence of professionally trained administrative 
officials on both sides who are accustomed to think in terms of costs; 
civic pride and sense of identity, especially in growing cities; employ- 
ment in affiliated libraries of professionally trained librarians who, 
while they may wish to co-operate, prefer an active rather than a sub- 
ordinate role. While there is no centralized administration in these 
cases, there may actually be more co-operative activities as the study of 
costs and contributions leads the cities to ask for additional services. 

Sharing of book resources exists in all affiliates, but other activities 
characteristic of systems appear less often. Centralized processing is 
not frequent, although it appears to be increasing. There are few 
examples of joint evaluation of books, and what division of responsi- 
bility for purchase of different types of materials exists seems to be 
less the result of planning than of adaptation to existing conditions. 
Reciprocity of use is general, although there are three affiliated libraries 
that do not circulate their own (city) books to borrowers outside the 
city without payment of a fee. Two of these are of the involuntary type. 

" Not necessarily in "emergent" afHliates. 



262 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



Librarians' View of Affiliation as a System 

In tlie interviews, both city and county librarians were asked whether 
or not librarians in affiliated libraries felt that they were part of a 
system, with the following result : 



TABLE XII. "SYSTEM SENTIMENT" OF CITY LIBRARIANS 





By type of affiliate 


By population group 




Prior 


Emergent 


Invol. 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Totals 


Yes 

from both 

from city only 

from county only 


2 
4 
4 


3 


2 
1 
2 


2 
2 
2 


3 

1 
2 


2 
2 
2 


7 
5 
6 


No 

from both 

from city only 

from county only 


3 
10 


"i 


2 
6 


2 
5 


1 
8 


2 
4 


5 

17' 


Not sure 

from both 

from city only 

from county only 


'i 

U 


'i 


1 
"6 


1 
1 
6 


'8 


'i 


1 

1 

18 



The total "yes" answers from cities was 12, from counties 13. The total 
"no's" from cities totaled 22, from counties 5. Unless the county 
librarians' estimate of the relationship is at fault, it seems probable 
that the "not sure" replies from counties correspond to "no's" from 
cities. 

The "no's" do not and should not be considered to imply total lack 
of realization of co-operative aspects of the relationship. They do, how- 
ever, in the case of city responses at least, mean that the libraries are 
felt to be more truly described as independent libraries with some con- 
nection with the county library, than as parts of the county library 
with some separate features. 

Meeting Attendance 

Attendance at meetings of the county staff, where these are held, is 
a practice among a majority of affiliated librarians and one that might 
seem to lead to closer relationships. Some meetings are devoted to book 
evaluation and selection. Failure to attend does not necessarily mean 
lack of awareness of mutual interests. For example, some city librarians 
must pay a substitute to attend meetings. On the other hand, several 
city librarians make a point of attending regional meetings of library 
administrators in addition to, or instead of, county meetings. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 1, SPRING, 1 962 

TABLE XIII. ATTENDANCE AT COUNTY MEETINGS— CITY 
LIBRARIAN AND/OR STAFF 



263 





By type 


By population group 




Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3,000 


3,000 

plus 


Over 
10,000 


Totals 


Attends _ _. 


8 


2 


2 


3 


4 


5 


12 






Does not attend 


3 


-- 


-- 


-- 


2 


1 


3 


None held 


9 


2 


11 


10 


8 


4 


22 



The three iolntly operated libraries were omitted from this table. The fact that no meetings are available for 
most affiliated staffs to attend makes any conclusion unsatisfactory, but apparently those who can in most 
cases do. 



NEWS NOTES Listing 

Another small but perhaps significant indication of city librarians' 
view of their relationship to the county is the objection of some to the 
manner of listing their libraries in the annual statistical issue of NEWS 
NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. Affiliates have been listed 
in parentheses below the county libraries in the statistical tables, and 
thus appear in the population groupings of the county libraries and 
not in tables with cities comparable in size. Circulation of county books 
through affiliates is credited in NEWS NOTES to the county library. 

City librarians point out that the size and scope of their libraries' 
operations are not truly pictured. They wish not only to compare them- 
selves with cities of comparable size, but to use total statistics in budget 
presentation. The cost of the book itself they point out is but a fraction 
of the total cost of a circulation, and in most cases this additional cost 
of circulation of county books is borne by the cities. From the county 
viewpoint, however, there is little difference in sending a book to cir- 
culate from a branch or from an affiliate. 

So long as circulation statistics loom as large as they do in evaluating 
the effectiveness of a library, at least in the minds of officials, this 
problem is a real one. Larger affiliates are more likely to be concerned. 



TABLE XIV. CITY LIBRARIANS WISHING TO CHANGE 
STATISTICAL LISTING 





By type 


By population group 




Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3,000 


3,001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Totals 


Yes-_ — - 


8 


3 


6 


4 


6 


7 


17 






No - 


2 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


2 


2 






No opinion 


13 


1 


7 


9 


9 


3 


21 



The two negative replies came from city-county libraries administered jointly. 



264 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

The Three "Combined Operation" Affiliates 

The three situations in which city and county service are combined 
have some factors in common, but are not altogether alike. All are 
"prior" affiliates, having been established as city libraries before the 
county library was formed. All are in county seats, and can thus com- 
bine city outlets with county headquarters service. All have one city- 
county librarian in charge of both "libraries." And all have tended 
toward a more unified administration and operation. Officials in each 
case are fully aware of the relationships. 

The differences are chiefly in extent of city participation in costs. In 
only one of the three does the city bear a substantial share. In another 
the city's contribution is small in proportion to the county's, and in 
the third the city contributes only to the costs of a new building, and 
will cease to do so when the building is paid for. The last-cited is now 
a borderline affiliate and will soon cease to be one. 

In the other two cases, the cities are receiving a higher level of serv- 
ice than the remainder of the system, roughly commensurate to the 
amount of the city's contribution. While not ideal in details, these 
joint city-county libraries offer an example that might be followed or 
improved on by city and county libraries when they exist in the same 
cities. 



Effect on Affiliation of Larger Systems or Co-operatives 

One of the county libraries with affiliates is a member of a larger 
system offering a variety of services. Three other counties are members 
of a processing center and one is a member of a multi-county informa- 
tion and reference service. As all these co-operative efforts are fairly 
new, it is perhaps too soon to consider their effect on the affiliated li- 
braries concerned. However, certain facts are now available. 

Two of the three affiliates of the system member have elected not to 
join the system. They are therefore not receiving direct benefits of sys- 
tem membership, but participate to some extent indirectly through the 
county library's membership. Presumably the increased resources, re- 
leased time, faster request service through teletype and delivery of 
loans to the county library, etc., have some effect on the county's service 
even to the nonmember affiliates. The affiliate that has chosen member- 
ship receives these system benefits directly, along with other system 
services, but is still dependent on the county library for many resources 
and services. One of the nonmember affiliates has ceased to receive proc- 
essing service as a result of the county library's system membership. 
The decision in this case was made by the city. 

The county libraries that are members of a processing center can also 
pass on some benefits to their affiliates, even though the latter are all 
nonmembers. Catalog cards with books sent on shipment are supplied 
through the center (extra cards for each copy), and improvements in 
county library service made possible by the time released from proc- 
essing are presumably also enjoyed to some extent by the affiliates. Two 
affiliated libraries in one county are members although the county li- 
brary is not. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 



265 



The three affiliates of the member of the co-operative reference serv- 
ice are themselves members, through their relationship with the county 
library. At the time this study was made, the service was too new for 
an estimate of its usefulness and its effect on the affiliates. Future de- 
velopments will determine whether the service becomes and is thought 
of as an added advantage of relationship with the county, or an addi- 
tional city library resource that lessens its dependence on county serv- 
ices. If and when the service is supported financially by its members, 
the affiliates' share may be paid by the county (on the basis of total 
population taxed and served) by the cities, or jointly. This decision 
will almost certainly have some effect on the affiliation itself. 



VI. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG LIBRARIANS 

Personal relationships are important in the actual cases studied, even 
though individuals and their characteristics are shifting factors that 
cannot be measured and studied as can more stable and objective ones. 
Several of the interviews brought out changes in the overall relation- 
ship because of personnel changes, and the purely personal element 
seemed at times the only reason for changed attitudes. 

Kesponses to a question about relationships among city and county 
librarians tend therefore to include these purely personal reactions. 
However, they also include to some extent the librarians' general con- 
cepts of appropriate relationships, and are given here as part of the 
total picture. 



TABLE XV. 


RELATIONSHIPS 


AMONG LIBRARIANS 






Type of affiliate 


Population groups 




Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3,000 


3,001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


Cordial 


8 


2 


1 


2 


5 


4 


11 


Friendly, not close. 


11 


1 


12 


10 


8 


6 


24 


Cool or distant 


1 


1 


-- 


1 


1 


-- 


2 


Totals--. 


a20 


4 


13 


13 


al4 


no 


^37 







The three libraries under one city-county librarian omitted. 



It seems probable that the presence in some affiliates of professionally 
trained librarians has some effect on relationships. In addition to those 
listed below with formal professional training, several librarians of 
affiliates have experience and abilities of a high level which might en- 
title them to be included in all but an arbitrary listing. They are not 
included in the table because such a judgment would necessarily be 
subjective. 



266 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



TABLE XVI. PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED LIBRARIANS IN 
AFFILIATED LIBRARIES 



Type 


Under 
3,000 

population 


Percent 


3,001- 

10,000 

population 


Percent 


Over 

10,000 

population 


Percent 


Total 


Percent 


Prior . _ 


1 


11 


2 


26 


3 


50 


6 


26 






Emergent 


1 





1 


50 


1 


100 


2 


50 


Involuntary 








3 


60 


3 


60 


6 


46.1 


Totals ----- 


1 


7 


6 


40 


7 


58.3 


14 


35 







In one ease, an afBliated librarian is professionally trained while the county librarian lacks such formal 

training. 



VII. LIBRARIANS' EVALUATION OF AFFILIATION 

Both city and county librarians were asked to identify the chief prob- 
lem met as a result of affiliation, and to name what they consider the 
main advantage. As might be expected, answers differed from city and 
county viewpoints : 



TABLE XVII. CHIEF PROBLEM MET BY CITY LIBRARIANS 





By type 


By population 


Problem 


Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3,000 


3,001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


None 


5 


1 


5 


6 


4 


1 


11 






Slow service 


4 


1 


2K 


2J^ 


4>^ 


M 


7>^ 


Inadequate or old 


3M 


1 


2M 


2 


W2 


SVz 


7 






Books recalled 


13^ 


-- 


Yi 


-- 


V2 


W2 


2 


Duplication 


1 


-- 


-- 


-- 


-- 


1 


1 


Failure to get mon- 
ey's worth 


1 


.. 


1 


„ 


2 


- 


2 


Isolation — lack of 
participation, etc. 


4 


1 


\V2 


2M 


iy2 


2>^ 


6J^ 


Totals -- 


a20 


4 


13 


13 


"14 


10 


"37 







The three jointly operated librarians' replies are given with county librarians, in nest table. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 1, SPRING, 1 962 267 

TABLE XVIII. CHIEF PROBLEM MET BY COUNTY LIBRARIANS 





By type 




By population 




Problem 


Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 




3 


1 


.. 


3 


1 


.. 


4 






Administrative red 


2 


V2 


11 


3 


5 


hVi 


y^Yz 






Authority lacking. _ 


6 


W2 


-- 


3^ 


2>^ 


Wi 


W2 


Duplication 


2 


1 


-- 


V2 


IJ^ 


-- 


3 


City books not 
available to county 
readers 


1 








1 




1 






County books 
shelved separately. 


1 


.. 




1 


.. 


.. 


1 


Lack of books and 
staff to serve cities. 


2^ 




.. 


1 


W^ 




2>^ 


Financial; lack of 
understanding of 
value of central 
services -. 


2>^ 




2 


1 


W2 


2 


43^ 






Lack of acceptance 
of system idea 


3 








1 


2 


3 


Totals 


23 


4 


13 


13 


15 


12 


40 



There is less variation in responses on the positive side. Over half the 
city librarians felt that the greatest advantage of affiliation was access 
to a larger book resource. Slightly over a quarter found the greatest 
value in the existence of some type of co-operation, an answer that prob- 
ably includes access to resources, but goes further in its implications. 
Those who made this response recognized the value of systems and felt 
that affiliation was a step in the right direction. Four emphasized the 
value of being "included" — possibly a more personal response of the 
same kind — and one cited '4ack of interference." One found no ad- 
vantage, and one mentioned the value to the city fringe of access to the 
city's collection in addition to access to a larger resource. 

Among the county librarians the co-operative feature received 
slightly less than half the votes. When the second highest total, a some- 
what vague concept of "good feeling" is added, the combined votes 
account for 30 of the 40 county views. The responses in support of 
"good feeling" tended to consider the relationship as far from ideal 
but better than none. Nine county responses cited better service to city 
library users (urban and fringe) as the chief advantage, and one 
county librarian could think of no advantage. 

When the results are considered by type of affiliate, city responses 
indicated resources as the chief advantage in all the emergent affiliates 
and in over half the "prior" group. Only the involuntary group gave 
this feature less than half the votes. There is a correlation here with 
the amount of book service given, as the involuntary group on the 



268 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 



whole receives less of its book stock from the county, and is in par- 
ticular less likely to receive shipments. The four librarians who men- 
tioned "inclusion" were all in "prior" affiliates; it is in this group 
that more cordial relationships were also found. The most noticeable 
county response by type is also found among the county librarians 
with involuntary affiliates. It is here that "good feeling" is oftenest 
mentioned. Here again it is important to remember that although 
there are 13 responses listed (for 13 affiliates) there are in actuality 
only two county librarians responding for this group. 

There appears to be no special pattern in responses by size of affiliate, 
from either city or county librarians. 



TABLE XIX. GREATEST ADVANTAGE 
A. Opinions of City Librarians 





By type 




By 


size 






Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 




12 


4 


4^ 


8 


7 


5K 


203^ 






Cooperation 


4 


-- 


6 


3 


4 


3 


10 


Lack of interfer- 


.. 


_. 


1 


.. 


1 




1 






' 'Inclusion' ' 


4 


-- 


-- 


2 


2 


-- 


4 


None 




-- 


1 


-- 


-- 


1 


1 


City service to 
county fringe 


.. 


.. 


K 






M 


3^ 


Totals 


20'' 


4 


13 


13 


14 a 


10» 


37 » 



a The three joint operations are included with county responses. 

B. Opinions of County Librarians 





Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


Cooperation 


13 


2 


2 


4 


6 


7 


17 


Better service to 
city 


7 


2 


.. 


3 


4 


2 


9 


"Good feeling" 


2 


-- 


11 


5 


5 


3 


13 


None 


1 


-- 


-- 


1 


-- 


-- 


1 


Totals 


23 


4 


13 


13 


15 


12 


40 



Closely related to the factors of greatest advantage and disadvantage 
is the question of whether the relationship is worth continuing. To 
some extent replies on this subject measure the weight given to values 
and problems. Asked to name an advantage, any librarian, however dis- 
satisfied, can probably find some positive value; and, equally, one 



VOLUME '^'J^ NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 



269 



pleased in general can find some problem when questioned. Whether 
the values outweigh the disadvantages in the minds of the librarians 
concerned does not emerge until the broader question is asked. 

City librarians' responses were overwhelmingly in the affirmative. 
All but two felt the relationship worth continuing, one did not and one 
was not sure. Three of those answering affirmatively felt that strong 
modifications were needed. 

The majority of county librarians also felt affiliation worth contin- 
uing. Here, however, the majority was not so great. Out of 40, 24 
answered affirmatively, but six of these felt modifications were needed. 
Four felt the arrangement was not worth continuing, and 12 were not 
sure. These responses would seem to indicate that the difficulties ex- 
perienced by county librarians are greater than those of city librarians. 
They may also reflect the fact that county librarians tend to be more 
aware of the financial factor. It is notable that the "Not sure" re- 
sponses came chiefiy from county librarians with involuntary affiliates 
(two librarians answering with regard to 13 affiliates), and that the 
involuntary affiliates themselves all felt the relationship worth contin- 
uing, even though three had reservations. 



TABLE XX. VIEWS ON DESIRABILITY OF CONTINUING AFFILIATION 
A. City Librarians 





By type 




By 


size 






Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


Yes 


19 


3 


13 a 


12 


13 


10" 


35 


No 


1 


-- 


-- 


1 


-- 




1 


Not sure 


-- 


1 


-- 


-- 


1 


-- 


1 


Totals 


20 b 


4 


13 


13 


14 b 


10 b 


37 b 



» strong modifications needed. (3 librarians) 

b Three joint operations included witii county responses. 



B. County Librarians 





By type 




By 


size 






Prior 


Emergent 


Involun- 
tary 


Under 
3000 


3001- 
10,000 


Over 
10,000 


Total 


Yes 


19 


3 = 


2ti 


7 


8 


9" 


24 


No 


3 


1 


-- 


3 


1 


-- 


4 


Not sure 


1 


-- 


11 


3 


6 


3 


12 


Totals 


23 


4 


13 


13 


15 


12 


40 



•= strong modiflcations needed. (1 librarian) 
"1 Strong modifications needed. (2 librarians) 
® Strong modiflcations needed. (3 librarians) 



270 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEBES 



VIII. GEOGRAPHIC CONSIDERATIONS 

The preceding tables have not attempted to give a geographic analy- 
sis. Type of affiliation and size of affiliate seem to present a more mean- 
ingful pattern than one based on geography; or perhaps more 
accurately, type and size occur in fairly definite geographic areas, so 
that a description of the two characteristics can readily be applied 
geographically. 

If the State is divided into North, Central region, and South, with 
a line from the Bay and Sacramento River extended to the Nevada 
line as the upper division, and the straight line that forms the southern 
boundary of San Luis Obispo, Fresno and Inyo Counties as the lower, 
the pattern is as follows : 



TABLE XXI. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF AFFILIATED LIBRARIES 





T. 


North 


T. 


Central 


T. 


South 






Prior 


Emerg. 


In vol. 


Prior 


Emerg. 


Invol. 


Prior 


Emerg. 


Invol. 


T. 


Under 
3000 


6 


5 


1 




3 


3 






4 


1 




3 


13 


3001- 
10,000 


4 


3 


1 


.. 


5 


5 


.. 


_. 


6 


._ 


1 


5 


15 


Over 
10,000 


1 


1 


.. 


.. 


4 


3 


1 


.. 


7 


2 


_. 


5 


12 


Totals 


11 


9 


2 


- 


12 


11 


1 


-- 


17 


3 


1 


13 


40 



Thus, the most common type of affiliate in the North is one established 
previous to the establishment of the county library in a city of under 
3,000 population. In the Central area, the same type predominates in a 
city of between 3,000 and 10,000 population. If the two areas are con- 
sidered together, as distinct from what is generally called "Southern 
California," 16 of the 23 affiliates are "prior" affiliates in cities of 
under 10,000 population. In the South, 10 of the 17 affiliates are of the 
involuntary type in cities of over 3,000 population with half of the 10 
in the over 10,000 population group. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 271 



IX. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS BY TYPE OF AFFILIATE 

While there are factors common to all affiliates, and some that occur 
to a greater or lesser degree regardless of type, there are patterns that 
do seem to be related to the historic, legal or financial relationships that 
differ among the affiliated libraries. 

1 . Affiliates Established Before County Library 

This type of affiliate is the most numerous, accounting for 23 of the 
40 examples studied. Twenty of these are in northern and central Cali- 
fornia. Historically, the city libraries concerned usually became 
"branches" of newly-established county libraries, normally very soon 
after the latter was formed. Presumably it was felt that existing li- 
braries might conveniently and economically serve as county library 
outlets, while at the same time benefiting from the resources of the new 
service. 

These historic facts may account for the continued payment of 
"rent" or "salary supplement" or both by several counties to the city 
or city librarian. The latter was considered to act in part as a branch 
librarian for the county, and space in the city building was used by 
the county in lieu of a branch maintained by -the county. 

There are more small communities represented in this group — 17 of 
the 23 are under 10,000 in population, and 9 under 3,000. As might be 
expected, there are fewer professionally-trained librarians in these 
affiliates — 6 out of the 23. Only half the affiliates in this group serving 
over 10,000 population have librarians with formal professional 
training. 

Eleven of the 23 — almost half — -have written contracts with the 
county. This number includes the three affiliated libraries that are 
jointly operated under one city-county librarian. This group compares 
favorably with the other types in number of official bodies that know 
and approve of the arrangement- — 10 of the 23. This fact is probably 
related to the existence of contract arrangements, the development of 
which would naturally bring the details to official attention. 

Ten of 16 affiliates of this type reporting received over half their 
book collections from the county library. Only 6 of 17 reporting had 
half their circulation resulting from county books. Most of the city 
librarians felt that the resources of the county library constitute the 
main advantage of affiliation, while the co-operative aspect (perhaps a 
different way of saying the same thing, though a wider meaning may 
be present) was most often mentioned by the county librarians. Most 
of the county librarians believe they would give more books and serv- 
ices to the presently-affiliated cities if there were no affiliated library, 
but the largest number of negative answers on this point comes from 
county librarians serving this group. They are probably referring to 
the smaller affiliates which receive the greater part of their existing 
resources and services from the county. 



272 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Six of the city librarians either feel they are not receiving full value 
from county library tax paid by their citizens, or question whether 
they are. Five county librarians feel affiliated cities are not receiving 
their money's worth. Most of the city librarians, as in all types, felt 
the relationship worth continuing. Three of the county librarians serv- 
ing this type of affiliate did not. 

Questions about city-county library relationships seem to reveal a 
difference in philosophy. County librarians commenting on this group 
most often mentioned lack of authority over the affiliate as the chief 
problem, while isolation or lack of participation was most often men- 
tioned by city librarians. County librarians tend perhaps to expect 
affiliates to fit into the general branch-headquarters pattern — in line 
with the historic idea that the affiliate became indeed a "branch" — 
while affiliated librarians (especially those with professional training) 
would like a more active type of participation or partnership. Only 
three county librarians, commenting on this group, believed the affil- 
iated librarians did not feel that they were part of a system, though 
11 confessed that they did not know. On the other hand, 13 city li- 
brarians felt more independent than part of a system, and three did 
not attend meetings held for county staff. More cordial personal rela- 
tionships existed among this group than among the involuntary affil- 
iates and their county librarians, but a larger number felt their 
relationship to be "not close," than "cordial." 

2. Emergent Affiliates 

As there were only four of this type at the time of the study, the 
sample is clearly too small to yield any clear indication of the char- 
acteristics of the "emergent affiliate." Historically, there have been a 
number of other city libraries that have begun as county branches and 
later established affiliated libraries. Most of these, however, have even- 
tually withdrawn from the county library system altogether, at least 
insofar as paying the county library tax is concerned. Some are now 
large cities, e.g. Burbank. 

Of the four examples, two are recently established libraries, one in 
a large metropolitan area, the other in a very small community. Two 
are much older and in medium-sized places. It is surprising, in view of 
the manner of their establishment, that only one of the four has a con- 
tract. Another, however, has a very close financial accounting arrange- 
ment. Only one reported lack of information on the part of city officials, 
and two reported that officials tend to question the arrangement. 

Three receive over 80 percent of their books from the county, three 
city librarians say they get their money's worth (all four county 
librarians believe they do), three feel part of the system, three feel the 
arrangement is worth continuing. All four city librarians believe re- 
sources are the greatest advantage. Two also have professionally 
trained librarians. All attend county meetings if they are held. 

This type of affiliate (on the basis of the small number existing) 
seems a little less informal than the previous group. Librarians are 
better informed. Kelationships seem more businesslike. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 273 

3. Involuntary AfRliafes 

Although there are 13 representatives of this type, only two counties 
are involved. Here again, therefore, there may not be enough of a 
sample to provide any but very tentative conclusions as to the char- 
acteristics. What follows is a description of existing conditions rather 
than any valid general conclusion. 

Less service is generally given to this group. In all but one case, a 
small percentage of affiliates' books comes from the county library, 
and a small proportion of affiliates' circulation (again with one excep- 
tion) is of county books. In two cases, this situation was expected to 
change very soon. 

Five city librarians expressed themselves as satisfied with the service, 
while five others felt it to be slow, inadequate, or both. Five mentioned 
resources as the chief advantage ; six, the idea of a library system 
(again, perhaps another way of saying the same thing.) All city li- 
brarians felt the arrangement worth continuing, although three felt 
important changes were needed. Several said they could not exist 
without the additional resources available. In spite of this desire to 
continue, seven city librarians felt they were not getting full value 
for their cities' contribution to the county library, or questioned 
whether they were. 

Both county librarians felt that the cities were not getting their 
money's worth, and both found administrative difficulties — problems of 
time and effort required to deal with several jurisdictions — the chief 
problem. Both counties question whether the relationship is worth con- 
tinuing, at least in its present form. They tend to feel that the greatest 
present advantage is the "good feeling" that exists among the li- 
braries, or the fact that some sort of system exists, even though it is 
not satisfactory. Separation, they feel, would be less so, and the city 
librarians agree. Ten cities would receive more from the county if they 
were part of the established service pattern, three about the same. Most 
of the city officials involved question the arrangements somewhat. 

Two cities are included in the general contract negotiated every year 
between the county and the (nonaffiliated^) city library giving county 
service. Both of these receive money payments from the county's appro- 
priation for library purposes. Ten of the cities in the group have over 
3,000 population, five over 10,000. 

There are six professionally trained librarians in these cities, all in 
the over 3,000 population groups. Relationships are, for the most part, 
definitely not those of county librarian and branch. They are business- 
like arrangements among equals or at least independent partners. City 
librarians in this group, as a rule, dislike to have their libraries con- 
sidered "branches." The professionals tend to be most critical of the 
county library service, although some at least are aware of the prob- 
lems facing the county librarians. 

3 According to the arbitrary definition used ; the cities involved — i.e., those that serve 
the county by contract — do contribute financially to county library service. 



274 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES 

X. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS BY SIZE OF AFFILIATE 

1 . The Smaller Affiliates 

There are 13 affiliated libraries in cities of under 3,000 population. 
Nine of these were established before the county library, and naturally 
none is in an area in which population explosion has been a serious 
problem. Obviously cities in this small population group cannot expect 
to provide adequate library service independently, and in fact five of 
the nine reporting libraries receive over half their books from the 
county libraries, seven over 30 percent. County books account for over 
half the circulation of three of the nine, and for over 30 percent of 
the circulation of six of the nine. Most of the city librarians believe they 
get full value for city support of the county library, and none definitely 
feels that the city does not get full value. The county librarians, how- 
ever, feel that five of the cities do not receive full value, for reasons 
outlined earlier. 

Reciprocity of borrowing privileges is the general rule among this 
group. Most city librarians attend county meetings when they are held. 
While fewer than half of the city librarians definitely felt their libraries 
were part of a system, more had this feeling among this population 
group than elsewhere. 

Cities of this size probably have as a rule a simpler government struc- 
ture and may have a greater feeling of common interest with the rural 
area than obtains in the larger city. These characteristics may account 
for the fact that fewer county librarians serving affiliates of this size 
found administrative red tape a problem. More "not interested" offi- 
cials are found in these cities, proportionally, although three of the 
13 affiliates have contracts. There is only one professional librarian in 
an affiliate of this size. 

In general, this size of affiliate has a fairly simple relationship with 
the county, with fewer problems. A larger number of both city and 
county librarians could find no problems than in the other population 
groups. The relationship is clearly one of dependency in most cases, 
approximating that of a branch in some respects. At least four of the 
cities, however, have made rather substantial efforts to provide good 
library buildings. 

2. The Larger Affiliafes 

The 12 affiliates in cities of over 10,000 population present quite a 
different picture. Some of the cities are considerably over the 10,000 
population mark. They are normally in more densely populated and 
growing parts of the State with stronger government structures. 

Seven of the 12 have professional librarians, a fact which may be 
related to other characteristics. (Most of the nonprofessionals are in 
the affiOliates of the "prior" type.) There is less "system sentiment" in 
this group, more feeling of being independent with an additional re- 
source available. There is more desire to be listed separately in NEWS 
NOTES, more criticism of old or inadequate book stock available from 
the county. 

Seven of the 12 affiliates have contracts, a sizeable number of officials 
are aware of the relationship. County librarians find administrative 
red tape to be the major problem. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 275 

Over lialf the city librarians (omitting the two city-county librar- 
ians) felt that the resources of the county library constituted the chief 
advantage. Slightly less than one-third listed the co-operative aspect. 
The emphasis on resources probably is reflected in the rather surpris- 
ing proportions of book stock supplied these libraries by the counties. 
Of nine cities replying, five received over half their books, and six over 
30 percent of their books from the county library. As in the other pop- 
ulation groups, circulation of county books was proportionately less 
than book stock^of seven responding, two had over 50 percent of the 
circulation from county books, and four over 30 percent. 

This fairly high proportion of county book stock seems the most 
notable characteristic of this group, and is probably accounted for by 
the combination of contracts, professional librarians, and informed 
officials. The larger affiliates are strong enough and informed enough 
to ask for their share of county library resources. In general, too, the 
counties involved are larger, richer and stronger, and thus better able 
to provide service to affiliates. Two of the three joint city-county oper- 
ations are in cities of this group. 

Nine of the affiliates would receive more than they now do from the 
county if there were no city library, according to county librarians. 
Half the county librarians do not believe the cities are receiving full 
value for city support of the county library, for reasons indicated 
earlier. Half the city librarians feel they do get full value, two think 
not, and three are not sure. All the city librarians feel the relation- 
ship is worth continuing. Three county librarians are not sure, but 
none is convinced that the affiliation should cease. Some librarians in 
both groups want strong modifications. 

Six of these affiliates have recent or fairly recent buildings, and 
others have well-kept buildings with attractive furniture and good 
equipment as a rule. 



3. The "Middle-Sized" Amiiafes 

The medium-sized affiliates appear to be the problem group. To over- 
simplify, they are large enough to provide some service of their own — 
enough to create problems of duplication of books, which was men- 
tioned most often as a problem in connection with this group. On the 
other hand, they are not apparently strong enough officially and pro- 
fessionally to negotiate with the county for a larger share of county 
library service. 

More city librarians believe they are not getting a fair return for 
city tax contribution, and the largest proportion of county librarians 
make the same comment. It is in connection with this group that the 
largest number of county librarians question whether the relationship 
is worth continuing. More city librarians lack ' ' system sentiment, ' ' and 
only 4 of the 15 cities have contracts. County librarians would give 
more service to a larger proportion of affiliates in this group if they 
were branches. Where meetings are held, city librarians are least likely 
to attend. 



276 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

In addition to duplication, slow service was mentioned more by city 
librarians of this group than by any other. Although the sample is too 
small for any real conclusion, there may be some significance to the 
fact that two of the four emergent affiliates are in this population 
range. 

XI. GENERAL CONCLUSION 

Is affiliation an old-fashioned relationship that has outlived whatever 
usefulness it might once have had? Is it, or can it be, a satisfactory 
permanent arrangement, contributing to better library service at rea- 
sonable cost? Or is it neither of these two, but an acceptable interim 
arrangement during a period of transition toward more satisfactory 
forms of library service ? 

No definite answers can be given to these questions without a good 
deal of further study. But it should be clear, from the data given 
earlier, that "affiliation" is a term that is applied to widely differing 
situations — and that therefore few if any conclusions can apply to all 
affiliates. 

Logically, it would seem reasonable that a community that is a part 
of a county library system ought to be able to make a local contribution 
(over and above its normal payment of the county library tax) and 
thereby provide itself with a higher level of service. This would appear 
to be the expectation of those communities which have established 
local libraries while remaining a part of the county system. Such a 
contribution could in fact be made without the establishment of an 
affiliate under existing library law. Except for the provision of build- 
ing, however, localities served by county libraries have not normally 
contributed extra sums to provide more service. 

Partly on the basis of the facts given above, and partly from per- 
sonal observation and impressions, the chief symptom of trouble in the 
relationship seems to be lack of serious effort to improve it. The rela- 
tionship is old; conditions have changed. Yet in relatively few in- 
stances has there been any conscious attention to the details of the 
arrangement with a view to making it fair and making it work. Irrita- 
tion and impatience have been present, but they have been concerned 
too much with surface factors. 

There are notable exceptions. In cases where librarians have really 
studied the situation and attempted to deal creatively with it, in the 
interest of good service, reasonably good solutions to problems have 
been found. There are evidences that study and creative solutions are 
developing elsewhere. In only one case has an honest attempt to work 
out problems met with continued frustration. 

The word "symptom" was used above to describe this situation, for 
behind it lies a larger problem. As the California Library Commis- 
sion's Reports indicate, county libraries in general are not as well sup- 
ported as are many municipal libraries. County librarians do not have 
time to devote to this problem; they do not have staff and books and 
equipment to enable them to give more to their affiliates. Until this 
lack of support is remedied, the service cannot be expected to improve 
substantially. 



VOLUME ^J^ NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 277 

As we have seen, the relationship is better where the county libraries 
are larger. It is also better where the affiliates are smaller and more 
aware of a large measure of dependence. It is best in the three situa- 
tions where the affiliate is in the county seat and consolidated to some 
extent with the county library, under one administrator. 

The following are observations and recommendations on specific 
points : 

Except perhaps in the case of very small affiliates, contracts seem to 
improve affiliation. Where contracts exist, it is important that city 
officials understand the value of the intangible services given by the 
county. And it is urgent that the county place full value on these 
services. Contract negotiations may well result in questioning of pro- 
cedures by city officials, and this questioning may in some cases reveal 
old-fashioned or inefficient methods of operation in county libraries. 
Hard as this may seem to county librarians and other officials, in the 
long run it may prove a benefit. In making contracts, it seems necessary 
to have a specific sum to represent city contributions to the county 
library tax. Either the previous year's total or an estimate might be 
used. 



Fringe-area service: 

There is some confusion among both city and county librarians about 
service by affiliated city libraries to county residents in fringe areas. 
In a number of cases one or both of the librarians has believed that the 
county books are placed in the affiliated library in return for such 
fringe-area service. This is only partly true; if the city serves the 
fringe area to any extent, it should be repaid in some manner by the 
county which would otherwise have to make other provisions to serve 
this group. But the residents of the city itself are entitled to receive 
county library service not by virtue of paying for service to the fringe 
area, but by virtue of paying the county library tax. This payment 
entitles them to use in addition all resources of any county branch or 
headquarters itself. An exception exists in the case of the two city 
libraries which serve involuntary affiliates by contract. While in both 
cases, the library services of the central city library are available to all 
county residents, including those who live in affiliated cities, these cities 
do not appear to be receiving sufficient reimbursement from the county. 
Ceasing to give reciprocal service would not be the answer to this prob- 
lem, but a backward step. 

Relationships among librarians: 

It seems clear that city librarians do not consider themselves as 
branch librarians, except perhaps in a few of the smaller affiliates. 
Better relationships might result if county librarians would fully and 
consciously accept the fact that they are not in fact branch librarians 
and affiliates not branches. 



278 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Reader service: 

As some of tlie service given to users of affiliated libraries is to 
fringe-area residents, and as all is to people who pay tlie county library 
tax, it is natural that county librarians feel in some measure responsible 
for its quality. In some situations there is no problem, as the quality 
of service is good. In all cases, attendance at meetings, with carefully 
planned programs to improve service at all outlets, would help. In 
counties with strong librarians in some affiliated libraries, the contribu- 
tion of the city librarians to such meetings could be great if such con- 
tributions were welcomed, and if city librarians assisted in planning 
the meetings. 

Boots: 

Some librarians have solved the problem of unwanted duplicates in 
shipments; others could surely do so. Separate shelving is confusing 
to readers and makes unnecessary difficulties for librarians. Affiliates 
serving fairly large populations suffer when books are constantly with- 
drawn from their shelves to meet requests — a fact that also makes a 
problem when catalog cards must be withdrawn. It should not be im- 
possible to devise a system whereby books are located semipermanently 
in affiliated libraries and returned there automatically when requests 
have been filled. In such a case, cards would not have to be withdrawn 
from affiliates' catalogs. Larger affiliates frequently add titles not in 
the county collection, j^et seldom is there any record at the county 
library of such resources, even though the city library would be glad 
to lend the books to county borrowers. Such a record could automatic- 
ally result from centralized purchasing (not selection). If officials 
could be persuaded to allow purchasing by another jurisdiction, cen- 
tralized processing and larger discounts might also be possible. This 
difficulty has been overcome in the case of processing centers and is 
not insuperable. County books on the shelves of affiliates are not always 
useful titles, and not all records of numbers of books in affiliates are 
up-to-date. On the other hand, city librarians may not always realize 
the usefulness of what has been supplied by the county. Meetings may 
help to solve this problem. 

Personnel: 

In a few cases personnel supplied by county libraries to affiliates 
work well under the supervision of the city librarian. However, this 
type of arrangement can produce problems for both sides. Working 
conditions, for example, may be different in the two jurisdictions, vaca- 
tions, hours, holidays, etc., may vary. It seems therefore better, all 
things considered, that the county pay the city for the salaries of staff 
it supplies to an affiliate, so that the individuals concerned will clearly 
be paid by and working for the city. There is a feeling, generally well- 
founded, among county librarians, that money payments to cities with 
affiliated libraries defeat the purpose of affiliation, and that service and 
not cash should be provided. In the case of staff and salaries, however, 
if the money payments are clearly earmarked, this objection does not 
seem important. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 279 

Statistics: 

The problem of circulation statistics is part of a larger one that will 
become more acute as co-operative systems and other contract arrange- 
ments increase. If County Library A contracts with (nonaffiliated) 
City Library B to serve the fringe area, the circulation is counted by 
Library B as a matter of course. Yet the service is paid for by Library 
A, whose officials naturally want their constituents to know that they 
have made this provision. If Library C, a member of a co-operative 
system, borrows a book from Library D of the same system and in 
turn lends it to a reader, the circulation may be counted at both points. 
Statewide and systemwide statistics may thus be distorted. The desire 
of both sides in each of these examples to count the circulation is 
natural, and is similar to the desire of both parties in the case of affilia- 
tion. One obvious answer to this question is to place less emphasis on 
circulation statistics, which do not in any case reflect total library 
service. Such a change in emphasis would require re-education of many 
officials and not a few librarians. Some change is surely needed. An 
ALA committee is now studying library statistics and may discover 
ways of meeting the problem. 

The questions posed at the beginning of this chapter remain to be 
answered. They cannot be answered with any certainty, but affiliation 
would have a better chance of being a fruitful relationship if the prob- 
lems cited above were attacked vigorously and imaginatively, either in 
the ways suggested or in others more suited to the individual situation. 

For the very small city library, affiliation comes close to fulfilling 
the purpose of enabling the city to have county library service plus 
something more. Most small affiliates with better buildings and longer 
hours than the county could provide are better off than they would be 
if they were completely independent, or county branches. 

The new systems now in existence that include county libraries with 
affiliates among their members will eventually demonstrate whether this 
relationship-within-a-relationship is desirable. At the present time it 
appears that the small affiliate in a system needs the county resources 
and is in a better position than the small independent city in the same 
system. As systems develop, this situation may change. 

Affiliation is an old relationship. Some attitudes of those who are a 
part of it need revision. Some of its characteristics probably have out- 
lived their usefulness and should be abandoned or modernized. Whether 
affiliation can be a satisfactory permanent arrangement for both sides 
can be determined only after steps are taken to make it satisfactory. 
In the meantime, pending these efforts and the results of the experi- 
ments now going on in the new systems, it seems unnecessarily drastic 
to sever these ties, especially as most of the librarians themselves have 
no wish to do so. Efforts to make affiliation more satisfactory will be 
valuable for their own sake, and even if the ultimate arrangement is 
amicable separation and reunion in a larger but looser library co-opera- 
tive with more members, the efforts toward improved affiliation will 
not be wasted, but will be helpful in the planning and organizing of 
the library service pattern of the future. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1962 281 



BORROWING FROM OTHER LIBRARIES 

By Carleton Kenyan * 

Lato Librarian 
California State Library 

When I first found out the nature of the topic assigned to me, my 
first thought stopped on the word "borrowing" . . . and this led to a 
pleasant feeling that I would be up-to-date and knowledgeable on the 
subject since I had just finished reading three books on borrowing. 
However, these books were read aloud to three avid fans of Mary 
Norton and were entitled The Borrowers, The Borrowers Afield, and 
The Borrowers Afloat. You see, borrowers are "English gremlins," 
about the size of pencils, who live in venerable houses and make their 
livelihood using and living on the goods of humans, i.e. borrowing. My 
children do not quite disbelieve that a lost button hasn't become a 
wash basin or a spool a table, somewhere behind the walls or under the 
floor. Anyway, after reading over the rest of the program I came to 
the conclusion that this kind of borrowing wasn't intended as the sub- 
ject of my talk. 

I assume we are all borrowers from other libraries, some more so than 
others, but this discussion is made primarily from the viewpoint of the 
lender. My position in the last two years has been in a law library, 
the main purpose of which is to provide books for borrowing by other 
libraries. In this regard the Shakespearean admonition "Neither a 
borrower nor a lender be ' ' cannot apply. 

It is common knowledge that libraries must join in co-operative, 
interlibrary endeavors. Also, it is a canon of librarianship that librar- 
ians must be fully cognizant of the functions and services available 
from other libraries, both local and beyond. It is not only a professional 
duty but a practical necessity for a librarian, holding himself before 
the public in a service capacity, to utilize all the resources available 
outside his own institution. 

Co-operative efforts among libraries may take many forms, among 
which are the following : 

1. Joint storage of little-used material. 

2. Joint acquisition programs. 

3. Bibliographical control, such as centralized cataloging and 

union lists of holdings. 

4. Exchange of duplicates. 

5. Joint microreproduction programs. 

6. Professional aid, e.g. consultation and advisory services. 

7. Photoduplication. 

8. Interlibrary loans. 

Even the best equipped library is subject, sooner or later, to demands 
upon its collection which it cannot supply. Rather than drop the matter 
at that point, it is incumbent upon the librarian to seek intelligent aid 
from another library or libraries. A certain court law library in the 

* Paper delivered at Institute of Law Librarianship, April 6, 1962, Los Angeles, spon- 
sored by the Southern California Chapter of the American Association of Law 
Libraries. 



282 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

San Francisco area is notorious for its refusal to participate in any 
joint endeavor with other law libraries. The reason given is dislike of 
outside "snooping." As a result of this aloof position, the library has 
restricted itself to a narrow base, since it isn't by any means large in 
book stock, and has thereby injured the quality and quantity of service, 
and ultimately the administration of justice. The same situation ob- 
tains in other libraries which lack proper administration or have prac- 
tically no administration at all. The principle — that what one does not 
have isn't missed — which is involved in the size of a book collection, 
applies to interlibrary co-operation as well. 

Borrowing from other libraries involves several forms of co-operative 
effort. Essentially, it takes the form of interlibrary loan of materials, 
union lists and photoduplication services. Interlibrary loan is an effort 
to extend the range of a collection, especially in the area of the least 
used kinds of items, by pooling resources. Union lists exist to channel 
users to the libraries where certain material is housed, and secondarily 
to provide a record for interlibrary loans. Photoduplication makes li- 
brary material available when direct use cannot be offered, and when 
it is more feasible and less costly to send photoduplicates than originals. 

Interlibrary loan involves many problems. 

1. The large versus the small library relationship. The primary 
burden of workload and temporary nonuse of material is thrown 
on the large library. This requires borrowing libraries to use a 
a fair balance in requests, and to strive for consideration and 
co-operation. Large libraries must have a spirit of generosity 
and noblesse oblige, and in turn, the small library must tailor 
requests to nonfrequent demands and make full use of all its 
resources. 

2. Type of library, whether private, public, university, or court. 
Here the borrowing library must know individual library situa- 
tions, their services and their policies. Public libraries should be 
used as a first recourse. Some libraries view other institutions 
as rivals (this is a good point in building a collection) and thus 
view any co-operative effort as a restraint on complete freedom 
for their library. 

3. The mechanics of operation, e.g. methods of borrowing, payment 
of costs, use of photoreproduction in place of item lending and 
control exercised over loaned items. Cost is a factor. Inter- 
library loan is an important service. However, it is expensive 
both for the lending and borrowing library. 

An often-repeated admonition, and one which bears continual repeti- 
tion, is that it is necessary to verify the sought-for item and to render 
it as bibliographically complete as possible before initiating a request. 
Other libraries shouldn 't be burdened with a request in garbled form ; 
the responsibility is on the requesting library to screen these requests 
and not "pass on this responsibility." E.g., one of the most frequent 
requests to the State Law Library is for legislative histories of a spe- 
cific code section. In this case what is expected — debates, committee re- 
ports, or committee hearings? Generally speaking, it is the local librar- 
ian's responsibility to solve this; it is not the sort of question that 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPKING, 1 962 283 

should be passed on to another library which might have a mysterious 
source of knowledge. In other words, proper screening of requests is 
necessary. I'm sure many of you can relate similar experiences. What 
is also very important, both for interlibrary requests and reference 
questions, is to give the source of citation. 

After full and complete details are listed, local resources should be 
exhausted before seeking to borrow from outside the local area. Non- 
local borrowing should not be a grapeshot operation but a sharpshoot- 
ing, knowledgeable pursuit. Use should be made of union lists; any 
local or special lists, regional, state and special, like Union List of 
Serials, New Serial Titles, National Union Catalog, library holding 
catalogs, special lists like foreign periodical holdings in California (35 
Jouryial of the State Bar 743), American law library holdings (45 Law 
Library Journal 145), U.S. Supreme Court records and briefs locations 
(40 Law Library Journal 82), Ash's Subject Collections (1961), and 
A Guide to Special Book Collections and Library and Reference Facili- 
ties in the Area of the District of Columbia (1959). 

Federal government depositories are listed in the September issue of 
the U.S. Catalog of Monthly Publications. This is also a valuable source 
for checking government publications, many of use to law libraries. The 
newly added section of the Weekly Law Digest, "Selected United 
States Government Publications," culls government documents for the 
legal profession. State government depositories are listed in the annual 
listing of the California State Publications. Since 1961, law libraries 
have been able to become depositories over and above the selected de- 
positories. 

Procedures and policy should be known, as much as possible, to a 
library requesting to borrow. Operations in this field vary from library 
to library, although supposedly the General Interlibrary Loan Code, 
approved by the American Association of Law Libraries, is tollowed. 
Lending policies, though, are framed on a library to library basis. The 
directory of interlibrary loan facilities of law libraries (46 Law Library 
Journal 14) runs through the gamut of the "each case considered on 
its merits" bases of the general rule — reciprocating libraries, state 
libraries, graduate students, judges, noncurrent only, more than one 
copy; not lent— are rare, reference (which means the same as on its 
merits), current statutes, periodicals, looseleaf services, student's texts, 
casebooks, appeal papers, digests, citators, encyclopedias, serials, re- 
ports, form books — what is left in a library to lend ? 

I don't believe most of the libraries mean exactly all of the negative- 
ness involved in the enumerated nonlending items. Their informal 
policy is much more liberal. In many cases it is the old saw about whom 
you know. On the whole, law libraries are most willing to go to great 
extents to aid other law libraries by the loan of an occasional book, 
but this service is not broadcast, nor is it felt to be an obligation. 

Local areas have tried to come up with their own codes. The Chicago 
Association of Law Libraries in 1951 (44 Law Library Journal 313), 
as part of a co-operative program, issued a code, not too specific, on use 
of other libraries, interlibrary loans and direct loans. 

I suppose what are most needed are area co-operative projects, in 
each of which an operation manual is produced giving specific rules 



284 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

and kinds of service available from libraries in tbe area, with a follow- 
up system that would keep these libraries aware of changes. Or possibly 
a central referral service could be established whereby requests might 
be channeled to the appropriate library or libraries. 

Earl Borgeson, Librarian of Harvard University Law Library, re- 
cently made the following statement : ' ' the Harvard Law School Li- 
brary does offer and does provide to the legal profession its total library 
resources"; and also: "the total resource of the Harvard Law School 
Library are at the disposal of any member of the legal profession." 
Further, in the Annual Legal Bibliography published at this library 
there is the statement that the items listed are "available on inter- 
library loan." These pronouncements sound wonderful and provide a 
welcome answer for many of the requests which the State Law Library 
cannot fill. However, I wondered if, practically speaking, these state- 
ments should perhaps be prefaced by "first loyalty to Harvard, Har- 
vard alumni, Cambridge residents and then others in decreasing pro- 
portion"? To learn more, I wrote Mr. Borgeson to ask him to amplify 
these statements, and I listed specific items which the State Law Library 
could not handle, and asked if his library would lend these items to 
us. I received a reply to the effect that although the Harvard Law 
School Library desires to serve as great an audience as possible, and 
are so orientating their program, and while the school wishes to meet 
the needs that are not met by law library resources more convenient to 
the borrower, practical limitations must be recognized, i.e., "our pri- 
mary audience, our students and faculty, must be served first." Certain 
materials will not circulate but photocopy service is offered where 
applicable. It makes a difference whether the audience served is a 
governmental agency, academic persons, or, in the case of a library, 
the nature of the library requesting. The general rule, "each case on 
its own merits," is the basic rule observed in interlibrary lending by 
Harvard. Needless to say, most of the materials requested in my list 
were unavailable for borrowing, and my hopes of looking toward this 
library as a source of generous interlibrary loans were shattered. 

Theoretically if a book exists in the State of California it is available 
through any local library borrowing from other libraries. The responsi- 
bility of the State Library is definite: it shall make available all but 
certain basic items, such as novels, children's and medical books, to 
any library in the State, thereby serving every citizen of the State. 
The State Library policy is grandiosely and continually announced as 
maintenance of a collection supplemental to the other public library 
collections in the State. This is, of course, an overstatement in light 
of the collections ' of some metropolitan libraries. Also, through the 
oldest union catalog in the United States (1909) holdings of public 
libraries are recorded. This does not include law libraries but only 
those law books incidentally acquired by general public libraries. 

Actually the State Library is a mixture of extension service and 
interlibrary loan service because : 

(1) Except in certain cases, materials are not directly loaned to 
individuals, but only to local libraries. 

(2) Reference books and certain other items cannot be circulated. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 2, SPRING, 1 962 285 

In practice, the State Library cannot perform effective interlibrary 
loan service, for this is beyond past and present financial means. Not 
only is the State Library bereft of the necessary funds- — and this in- 
cludes the State Law Library — for acquisition of single copies, but also 
for the multiple copies necessary for such effective operations. Good 
service requires money for books, materials and personnel, and these 
are woefully lacking. The State Library does function fairly well for 
nonmetropolitan libraries and especially those in the northern part of 
the State. It has little to offer the tremendous book-stocked resources 
of the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas except in cases where free 
interchange is impeded or the local librarians aren't aware of local 
facilities. 

The State Law Library, as part of the State Library, fits into the 
same pattern. We are not the "Mother Lode of law libraries." Our 
budget prevents proper acquistion of books and materials, and person- 
nel. "We are actually several law libraries in our services, but are unable 
to fulfill all or any well : 

(1) Keference library to the Legislature, state officers and employees 
in all branches of government. 

(2) Circulation library for : 

(A) Local bench and bar, state and federal courts, direct loan 
to state employees and Sacramento residents. 

(B) Interlibrary loan resource for law libraries, general public 
libraries, school and college libraries, and prison and other 
institutional libraries of the State as a whole. 

Bach service requires similar basic items and, with one copy pre- 
scribed by circumstances, we are bound to run into "messy" situations. 

In 1960-61 circulation outside the State Library building was, by 
type of borrowing agency : 

Local loans 6,191 

Interlibrary 1,287 

Prisons 3,577 

Total 11,055 

Among our most frequent borrowers are the county law libraries, the 
Continuing Education of the Bar Library and others through the 
county and public libraries, since there is no law librarian present in 
most counties, the Nevada State Library, other state supreme court and 
state libraries, law firms, county jails, colleges, and public libraries. 
Small attention is given to unverified requests, to those showing no 
bibliographical pre-search, and to prison requests. Where possible, 
reference is made to a local library. A photoduplicate is offered 
(copease, thermofax and photostat) in place of the original item, 
within copyright limitations. And substitutions and excerpts from 
requested material are often sent — state editions of codes and pam- 
phlet laws, federal and state pamphlet laws, slip laws, advance sheets 
retained to form a duplicate copy, session law rather than code section. 
The method doesn't work in all cases, but through "scrounging 



286 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

around" the contents of many noneirculated materials are made avail- 
able on loan. 

We do not use or promote use of the American Library Association 
Interlibrary Loan Eequest form. This is because our circulation is a 
quantity production and these forms cannot be used for charge-outs. 
Therefore, we use our own forms, keep a mailing address and stamp for 
each institution, supply them with the forms, and require that no 
shipping payment be made but that the borrowers mail the books 
back. Our loan period is generous and prescribed by Administrative 
Code. 

I am continually dismayed at the public relations failure of the State 
Library. The responsibility for interlibrary loan makes the State Li- 
brary a unique institution. (By legislative enactment it is actually 
intralibrary loan since this service is not an adjunct but the primary 
purpose of the State Library. It places the agency in a libraries ' library 
role.) However, this service is certainly not widely known to law librar- 
ies, and even less so to the bench and bar. Frequent letters and tele- 
phone calls from the individual members of bench and bar for requests 
attest to this fact. The liberality of loan evokes amazement from the 
potential borrower. However, the State Library is in a dilemma. Im- 
proved library service through increased finances — and thereby more 
books, materials and staif — stimulates increased demand for service, 
and thus creates new problems. As the collection grows, unit costs tend 
to increase at a higher rate — the acquisitions, bibliographical checking, 
and cataloging are more complex, the public service cost rises. Mass 
production techniques are as yet not available for practical use. The 
State Library is a sort of waif in the State system for it is connected 
with no university, court or filing fee and is only tacked on to Depart- 
ment of Education. Requests for increased budgets receive nominal 
support from some libraries of the State, but generally none from the 
remainder. The blame cannot rest entirely on the State Library itself, 
but is a part of a statewide library problem. 

In summary, interlibrary loan is a valuable device to extend the 
resources of all libraries. Its use should be employed as far as possible, 
but with the admonition to borrowers, except for state and public li- 
braries, that it is considered a privilege and a courtesy, not a right, 
and should not be abused. A librarian should first of all know the hold- 
ings, services, policies and procedures of local libraries in his area (and 
where feasible enter into agreements, such as payment for use) as a 
necessary part of his professional know-how. California libraries should 
be used next in order, with the national library the last resort. Requests 
should be intelligently placed and full bibliographical data and verifi- 
cation given for a specific request. For the lender, it would be well if 
some of the dedicated service accorded his clientele would filter into 
interlibrary co-operation. One of the objectives of the A ALL is to 
''foster the spirit of co-operation among members of the profession" 
and surely interlibrary loan is one of the first in rank. For I have found 
it a wonderful experience to be able to provide material for all kinds 
and types of libraries. 



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NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 




CALIFORNIA STATE 
LIBRARY STAFF 

■ Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, 

State Lihrarian 
m Mrs. Phyllis I. Dalton, 

Assistant State LihraTian 

■ Arlene Hope, Principal Lihra- 

rian, Library Consultant 
Services 
a Florence E. Biller, 

Library Consultant 

■ Shirley Brother, 

Library Consultant 

■ M. Virginia Hughes, 

Library Consultant 
u Margaret J. Ward, 

Library Consultant 

■ Barbara L. Wynn, 

Library Consultant 

■ Carleton W. Kenyon, 

Law Librarian 

■ Constance E. Lee, Principal 

Librarian, Reader Services 
u Mrs. Mabel Chorley, 

Circulation Section 
u Richard H. DOlon, 

Sutro Library 

■ Allan R. Ottley, 

California Section 

■ Eugene L. Pilce, 

Reference Section 

■ Mary E. Schell, Government 

Publications Section 

■ Mrs. Virginia S. Simpson, 

Books for the Blind 
Section 
w Melvin C. Oathout, Principal 
Librarian, Technical Services 

■ Alexander T. Birrell, 

Catalog Section 
a Mrs. Elisabeth Bruno, 

Union Catalog Unit 
w Mrs. Hildur E. Howe, 

Processing Center 
m Edith A. Irwin, 

Periodicals Section 
m Thomas J. Brooks, 

Processing Center 
u Margaret E. Preston, 

Order Section 
m Mrs. Avis Smith, 

Book Repair Section 
m Harlo Whipple, Property 

and Shipping Section 

EDITOR: Mrs. Natalie D. Smith 

California State Library, 
P. O. Box 2037 
Sacramento 9 
Issued quarterly in the interest of 
the libraries of the State by the 
California State Library. 
Entered as second-class matter 
December 1913, at the post ofRce 
at Sacramento, California, under 
the act of August 24, 1912. 
Accepted for mailing at the spe- 
cial rate of postage provided for 
in Section 1103, Act of October 
3, 1917, auth. August 27, 1918. 

Note: Abstracted in LIBRARY 
SCIENCE ABSTRACTS 



news notes 





calirornia 



raries 



Vol. 57, No. 3, Bummer, 1962 
CONTENTS 

Workshop, The Library in the Master Plan Page 

Introduction 288 

Program 289 

Welcome by the Honorable David B. Haight.. 292 
The Public Library, Planning, and the Cul- 
tural Awakening, by Mr. Mel Scott 293 

A Political Scientist Looks at Planning, by 

Dr. Ernest G. Miller-_ 305 

Planning on the State Level, a Panel _- -^ 312 

Mechanics of Planning, by Mr. Frank S. 

Skillman 324 

Planned Reality in Palo Alto, a Panel 328 

Planning From Many Angles: a Panel 332 

The Library and Architecture, by Mr. William 

Adamaitis 342 

The Private Planner in Planning, by Mr. 

William E. Spangle 345 

Evaluation of the Workshop, by Mr. Mel 

Scott 350 

California Libraries, Planning, Planning . . ., 

by Dr. Edward A. Wight 355 

Workshop Group Sessions 359 

Workshop Participants 368 

Planning in Print, a Bibliography 370 

Planning for Long-range Library Develop- 
ment, Report of a Survey 372 

California— the Friendly State?, by Mr. Frank J. 

Dem psey 373 

California "Friends of the Library" Organiza- 
tions, a Directory 375 



printed iu California state printing office 



THE LIBRARY 
IN THE MASTER PLAN 



288 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



INTRODUCTION 

One hundred Californians from all parts of the State attended the 
State Library Spring Workshop, "The Library in the Master Plan," 
held in Palo Alto, May 2-4, 1962. A glance at the registration list 
shows the variety of interests speakers and participants represented. 
There were county and municipal public librarians, college, university 
and special librarians, and library school educators; city, county, re- 
gional and industrial planners, public and private ; architects ; city 
officials; representatives from the County Supervisors' Association 
and the League of California Cities; library trustees and Friends of 
the Library; a political scientist; and interested citizens. 

The result was a mingling of many viewpoints, with profit to every- 
one. Whether they were on the formal program, or spoke from the 
floor, all participated with enthusiasm. That enthusiasm and the large 
attendance attested to the importance of the subject. Mrs. Carma R. 
Leigh, California State Librarian, welcomed the workshop group with 
the thought that "planning is our great need, our obvious need; but 
it is what we do the least, busy as we are with day-to-day problems." 
Workshop sessions gave participants an opportunity to look beyond 
those day-to-day problems and into the nature of the planning process, 
long-range library development programs, the social, cultural and edu- 
cational role of the public library in relation to its physical situation 
in the community and in the community master plan, and possibilities 
for co-operation between librarian and planner. 

Mrs. Leigh remarked that she was, as she had approached Palo Alto 
and the workshop, reminded of the question, "Are you here with a 
solution or are you part of the problem?" It was the consensus at 
the close of the meeting that everyone had been given a clear look at, 
and a greater understanding of the problems in each profession, and 
that each and everj^ participant had gathered a wealth of potential 
solutions to his own local planning puzzles. 



VOLUME 'j'J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 289 

WORKSHOP PROGRAM 
nHE LIBRARY IN THE MASTER PLAN'' 

May 2-4, 1962 
Foster Hall, Rickey's Hyatt House, Palo Alto 

WEDNESDAY MORNING— May 2 

9.00-10.00 Registration 

Presiding : Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, State Librarian 

10.00-10.30 Welcome 
Mrs. Leigh 

Welcome 

Honorable David B. Haight, Mayor of Palo Alto 

10.30-11.45 Kejmote Speech 

Mr. Mel Scott, Lecturer, City and Regional Planning, and Re- 
search Political Scientist, Bureau of Public Administration, 
University of California, Berkeley, Consultant for the Work- 
shop 

Listening Panel 

Howard Samuelson, Librarian, Santa Ana Public Library 
Barbara L. Wynn, Project Director, San Joaquin Valley Informa- 
tion Service 
Mr. Karl Vollmayer, Librarian, Redwood City Public Library 

Discussion 
WEDNESDAY LUNCHEON 

Presiding: Mrs. Leigh 

12.30- 2.30 ''A Political Scientist Looks at Planning" 

Dr. Ernest G. Miller, Assistant Professor of Political Science, 
University of California, Davis 

Discussion 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

Presiding: Miss Arlene Hope, Principal Librarian, 
Library Consultant Services 

2.45- 4.00 Panel: ''Planning on the State Level" 

Moderator: Mrs. Phyllis I. Dalton, Assistant State Librarian 
Participants: Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, State Librarian 
Mr. Elton R. Andrews, State Planner 
Mr. Jack Merelman, Legal Counsel, County 

Supervisors' Association 
Mr. Don Benninghoven, Field Representative, 
League of California Cities 
Discussion 

4.00- 4.15 Break 

Presiding: Mrs. Dalton 

4.15- 5.00 ''Mechanics of Planning" 

Mr. Frank S. Skillman, Planning OflBcer, San Mateo County 

Discussion 



290 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

WEDNESDAY NIGHT 

Presiding: Mrs. Dalton 

7.30 Introduction of tlie Session 

Mr. Mel Scott 

"Workshop Session 

Group I 

Leader: Miss Florence E. Biller, Library Consultant 
Librarian: Mr. Frank L. Dempsey, Acting Librarian, Berkeley 

Public Library 
Planner: Mr. James Fisk, Assistant Planner, Berkeley Planning 

Department 

Group II 

Leader: Miss Margaret J. Ward, Library Consultant 

Librarian: Mr. David Sabsay, Librarian, Santa Rosa Public ! 

Library 
Planner: Mr. F. Burk Ketcham, Jr., City and Regional Planner, 

Candeub, Fleissig & Ketcbam, San Francisco 

THURSDAY MORNING— May 3 

Presiding: Mrs. Leigb 

9.00-10.15 Panel: ''Planned Reality in Palo Alto" 

Moderator: Mr. L. Kennetb Wilson, Librarian, Palo Alto Public 

Library 
Participants: Mr. Lewis J. Fourcroy, City Planner 

Mr. L. Kenneth Wilson, City Librarian 
Mr. Alfred Mitchell, City Controller 
Mr. Tully C. Knoles, Member, Friends of the 
Library 

Discussion 
10.15-10.35 Break 
10.35-12.15 Workshop Session 

Group I 

Leader: Miss Biller, Library Consultant 

Group II 

Leader: Miss Ward, Library Consultant 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

Presiding: Mrs. Dalton 

2.30- 4.30 Panel : ' ' Planning From Many Angles ' ' 
Moderator: Miss Hope 

Participants: Mr. Coit Coolidge, Librarian, Richmond Public 
Library 
Mr. Harry G. Halatyn, City and Regional Planner, 

Sacramento 
Miss M. Josephine Moore, Librarian, Plumas 

County Free Library 
Mrs. Alice F. Reilly, Librarian, Fresno County 

Library 
Mr. Reino Liukkonen, County Planner, Fresno 
County 
Listening Patiel: Dr. Eugene D. Hart, Associate Professor, School 
of Library Science, University of Southern 
California, Los Angeles 
Miss Virginia L. Ross, Librarian, San Mateo 
County 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 291 

THURSDAY DINNER 

Presiding: Mrs. Leigh 

7.00 "The Library and ArcMtecture " 

Mr. William G. Adamaitis, Planner, Welton Becket and Associ- 
ates, Los Angeles 

Discussion 

FRIDAY MORNING— May 4 

Presiding: Mrs. Leigh 

9.00- 9.30 Workshop Reports 
Discussion 

9.30-10.45 "The Private Planner in Planning" 

Mr. William E. Spangle, Spangle and Associates, Menlo Park 

Discussion 

10.45 Evaluation of the Workshop 

Mr. Mel Scott, Consultant for the Workshop 

It 

FRIDAY LUNCHEON 

Presiding: Mrs. Dalton 

12.00 "California Libraries — Planning, Planning ..." 

Dr. Edward A. Wight, Professor of Librarianship, University of 
California, Berkeley 

Discussion 

ADJOURNMENT OF WORKSHOP 

Mrs. Leigh 



292 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



WELCOME 

The Honorable David B. Haight 
Mayor of Palo Alto 

"It is my privilege, as Mayor of the City of Palo Alto, to welcome 
you to our community. Palo Alto is essentially a suburban-residential 
community, with its reputation and claim to distinction resting on a 
base of sound cultural assets. The city was founded 73 years ago as a 
residential district for Stanford University. Its citizens, from the 
earliest days, have been motiA^ated by an active civic spirit and vision 
which has given rise to the Palo Alto of today — an outstanding com- 
munity with well-planned electronic and medical research centers, 
hospitals, light industry and trading areas, and numerous financial 
and business interests. 

"Palo Alto takes pride in its homes, its schools, its park and recrea- 
tional facilities and its five libraries serving the 55,000 residents. In 
July 1958, the City of Palo Alto opened to its residents two new 
libraries designed hj noted architect Edward D. Stone. These libraries 
were realized after many years of planning by civic officials and citizen 
committees all working together to better serve the library needs of 
Palo Altans. "We in Palo Alto believe in libraries, and we hope that 
you will have an opportunity to visit any or all of our city libraries 
during your three-day work session. 

' ' The State Library is to be commended for its leadership in forming 
this Planning Workshop. Not just because it is fulfilling its obligation 
to assist local authorities in assuming their full responsibility for 
library services, but because it recognizes the principle of successful 
management action — iDlanning. By identifying in advance the needs of 
our citizens, the opportunities, problems and obstacles can be better 
controlled while each phase of the planned program is carried out. 
Planning assures the most effective and economical use of people, equip- 
ment, facilities and money. A meeting such as this will permit the 
investigation of the many phases of planning. It may be the beginning 
for some; or a stage in development for those who are on their way 
toward setting definite guide lines and goals. 

"It is hoped that you will enjoy your stay in Palo Alto, and that 
each of you will experience a profitable learning situation in your 
deliberations." 



VOLUME ^'J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 293 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY, PLANNING, AND 
THE CULTURAL AWAKENING 

Md Scott, Jr. 

Lecturer in City Planning, Department of City and Regional Planning 
and Research Political Scientist, Bureau of Public Administration 
University of California, Berkeley 

"Before beginning this keynote speech, I feel compelled to make 
a few promises. I solemnly vow not to tell you that we are living in 
a time of crisis. I positively assure you that I shall not allude to the 
1,600 new people who arrive in California every day by stork, auto- 
mobile, train, bus, and plane, swelling the population and, of course, 
continually lowering the per capita number of library books in the 
State. I shall not even mention that the American people have more 
money, leisure, automobiles, paperback books, ulcers, and baffling vi- 
ruses than ever before in history. And I shall certainly avoid saying 
anything at all about creeping bureaucracy, hidden taxes, subliminal 
subversion, profitless prosperity, presidential carpetbagging, and similar 
horrors that turn the American dream into a nightmare. 

"All these subjects are either tiresome or depressing; and a keynote 
speech should somehow be inspiring and lofty. So I should like to 
talk about something new, precedent-setting, and exciting. That some- 
thing is this workshop. 

"To my knowledge, this is the first time in the history of any state 
tiiat representative librarians and representative city planners from 
all over the state have met together to discuss co-operative ventures 
in planning for the future. Librarians, trustees, and other officials 
have met at governors' conferences in many states, and sometimes 
city planners have addressed them. But never before have the profes- 
sions of library science and city planning combined forces to examine 
; the place of the library in the master or general plan of the city or 
' county. Nothing could more eloquently attest the progressive spirit of 
our California State Library and its staff, headed by Mrs. Carma 
Leigh, than this workshop. I have no doubt it will stimulate many 
similar workshops throughout the United States. 

"You probably wonder why it should have taken so long for the 

two professions to come together formally. I think I can offer an 

I explanation. The public library in this country is a long-established 

! institution, tracing its origin to Benjamin Franklin's circulating library 

in Philadelphia in 1731. But city planning, though born in the first 

, decade of this century, has been a significant influence in American life 

only since World War II. Even at the end of the war the American 

I Institute of Planners, the professional organization corresponding to 

\ the American Library Association, included only 225 members in the 

\ entire United States; and I can remember statewide meetings of the 

I California Chapter of the Institute in the early 1940 's attended by 

I not more than 35 or 40 members. Since that time the membership in 

our national organization has increased to approximately 2,500, and 



294 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

that of the California Chapter to 570. But the California Library- 
Association, a chapter of the American Library Association, alone 
includes as many members as all the chapters of the American Institute 
of Planners together. Although California is considered far ahead of 
most other states in the amount of city and county planning being 
done, there still are many municipalities and some counties which do 
not have a single planner on the payroll. Only in recent years have 
librarians in scores of cities in this State had an opportunity to meet 
and work with professional planners, because many of our local plan- 
ning agencies are no more than five or ten years old. It is therefore 
not surprising that this convocation of librarians and city planners 
should have been so long delayed. 

"We should have little to talk about, however, if there had not been 
a good deal of co-operation between planners and librarians in the past 
decade, witness the number of teams of planners and librarians who 
are going to describe collaborative efforts at this workshop. Throughout 
the United States, as well as in California, librarians have called upon 
city and county planners for assistance, and planners, when preparing 
comprehensive plans, have requested guidance from librarians in devel- 
oping standards for library sites and in determining general locations 
for additional branch libraries or new locations for existing libraries. 
San Francisco, Boston, Philadelphia, Toledo, Tulsa, Dayton, Nashville, 
Phoenix, South Bend, Macomb County, Michigan; Kern County, Cali- 
fornia; Burbank, South Gate, Berkeley, and many other cities and 
counties have either prodaeed general plans including a section on 
libraries or have prepared separate reports on libraries showing the 
relation of existing and proposed libraries to the general plan. In the 
early 1950 's there were few such plans ; now the number increases from 
year to year. This development reflects, I believe, the growing demand 
for planning in all fields and the heightened interest of the American 
people in education and cultural activities. 

"Not so many years ago it was common to find cities that had a 
planning office but no master or general plan. The planners would show 
you a plan of streets and highways, a plan of parks and playgrounds, 
perhaps one or two other special plans, and inevitably a zoning map 
that was thought of as a plan for the various uses of land in the city. 
Together, these plans, each prepared separately and at different times, 
were supposed to constitute some kind of scheme for the future develop- 
ment of the city. But they were woefully inadequate because they were 
piecemeal plans, unintegrated, sometimes not even based on the same 
set of assumptions about future population, economic trends, and the 
general direction of growth the city would or should take. The city, 
such as Cincinnati or Detroit, which had a comprehensive plan in which 
all the elements were carefully related to another was the exception. 

"As the pressures of rapid postwar growth forced city after city to i 
face the necessity of having something more than partial plans, more | 
and more cities began to emulate the few cities that did have genuinely 
inclusive long-range plans. Here in California some of the leading 
planners persuaded the state legislature to amend the state planning 
law to require that a master or general plan include all of the following 
elements (and I quote from the law) : 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. 3, SUMiVIER., 1 962 295 

" '(a) A land use element which designates the proposed general 
distribution and general location and extent of the uses of 
the land for housing, business, industry, recreation, education, 
public buildings and grounds, and other categories of public 
and private uses of land. 

"'(b) A circulation element consisting of the general location and 
extent of existing and proposed major thoroughfares, trans- 
portation routes, terminals, and other local public utilities 
and facilities, all correlated with the land use element of the 
plan [emphasis mine]. 

"'(c) A statement of the standards of population density and build- 
ing intensity recommended for the various districts and other 
territorial units, and estimates of future population growth, 
in the territory covered by the plan, all correlated with the 
land use element of the plan. 

" '(d) Supporting maps, diagrams, charts, descriptive material and 
reports. ' 

"In addition, the law provides that the general plan may include 
other elements, such as a plan for the conservation, development, and 
utilization of natural resources or a plan for the redevelopment of slums 
and blighted areas. The intent of the law is not to limit the scope of 
the master or general plan in any way, but to make sure that the plan 
embraces the whole territory of the city or county, that it takes into 
consideration every aspect of physical development, as well as social, 
economic, and technological development which will influence physical 
development, and that all elements of the plan fit together as well as 
the parts of a watch or an automobile. The repetition of the phrase 
'all correlated with the land use element of the plan' emphasizes the 
close-knit nature of the plan. The relationships of areas one to another, 
the extent of areas, the kinds of activities carried on in each of them, 
and the number of people living or working in them will all determine 
how much movement of goods and people there will be among the 
various districts and what kinds of trafficways and transit will be needed 
to handle this ceaseless flow within the city or county and to and from 
it. Likewise the basic pattern of land uses and the density of population 
and the intensity of land use in the various areas will determine the 
needs for sewerage and drainage, gas, water, and electricity and such 
community facilities as police and fire stations, schools, parks, play- 
grounds, libraries, branch health clinics, and hospitals. In short, the 
I master or general plan is an enormously complex scheme which should 
f be prepared only by persons with a great deal of knowledge, experience, 
I intellectual curiosity, and understanding of people and politics.I use 
I the word 'polities' in the sense of policy-making, and I add it because 
i the plan is more than just a technical document. Ideally, it should 
I represent the kind of community the residents desire ; and if the plan- 
I ners have done their utmost to sound out public opinion and to ascertain 
' what community aspirations and hopes are, it should serve as a useful 
i guide for the city council or county board of supervisors in making 
i decisions about laws and public projects to shape the future physical 
■ environment. 



296 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

''To convey an idea of the eompreliensiveness and complexity of a 
master or general plan, let me mention how many agencies, organiza- 
tions, and consultants participated in the preparation of the plan for 
one metropolitan area. Six different planning commissions in the area 
took part. Twenty-six other governmental agencies, including five li- 
brary boards and their staffs, contributed information and advice. 
These agencies ranged from city and county departments and special 
districts to state and federal bureaus and departments. The staffs of 
the several planning commissions were supplemented by economics con- 
sultants, architects and engineers, a real estate research corporation, 
a railroad consultant, a traffic engineering firm, and a general planning 
consultant. In addition to all these experts, many civic organizations 
and associations aided the whole planning process by participating in 
conferences, study groups, and public discussion seminars. In a word, 
hardly any resource that could be tapped was overlooked in the prepa- 
ration of the long-range plan. If the plan should have some deficiencies 
— and it is difficult to devise any plan which does not — it will not be 
because of failure to take a broad view of present conditions and future 
possibilities. It will be because of our human inability, with all our 
expertise, our data processing machines, and our most advanced plan- 
ning theories, to foresee everything that may affect urban and rural 
areas in the future. Although no plan can be an infallible guide, none 
of us would wish to be without a plan, because we cannot escape making 
decisions, and it would be irresponsible to make them without as much 
sound advice as we can obtain. And that, basically, is what a master 
or general plan is : sound or considered advice. 

" In a small community the preparation of a master plan is, of course, 
a much less formidable undertaking than in a large urban area. The 
planning staff may include only a few persons, and they may not need 
to confer with many officials, agencies, and citizens' groups to marshal 
the information required. But to be on the safe side, it might be well 
for the community to employ an able consultant firm to work with the 
local staff and guide the overall effort. The consultants presumably 
would have general as well as specialized knowledge and would offer 
experience gained in many other areas. 

"I am sure you were pleased to hear that five library boards and 
staffs contributed to the preparation of the metropolitan plan I men- 
tioned. That plan, as you would expect, includes a section on public 
libraries, carefully related to all other parts of the plan. The section 
recommends a metropolitan library system, urgently needed to provide 
library service in many outlying areas now lacking any form of service 
whatsoever. As any good plan for library service should do, this one 
states the objectives to be attained, the general principles to be applied 
in achieving the goals, the three basic functions to be performed (the 
circulation-reading room function, the reference-research function, and 
the administrative-supporting function), the standards for the location 
of libraries, the standards for the size of buildings, and the standards 
to be applied in developing sites. A map shows proposed general loca- 
tions of new libraries, and a chart compares current needs with future 
needs. I have read much more detailed reports presenting proposals 
for the expansion of library service, but this one succinctly discusses 
the essentials. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 297 

"When librarians can participate in the preparation of a long-range 
plan for library service as part of the process of preparing a general 
plan for an entire urban area, they are fortunate indeed. There is every 
prospect that all the demographic, economic, and political factors which 
should be considered in determining standards and deciding on a dis- 
tribution of facilities will be taken into account. In fact, I can hardly 
imagine a general plan being prepared nowadays without including 
public libraries, but surprising things do happen, and in some com- 
munities the plan for library service appears later as an amendment 
to the general plan. 

"The library plan which is developed before the community has a 
general plan is apt to be of doubtful value in the long run. Sometimes, 
however, an effort to prepare a plan for library service may awaken 
a community to the need for a genuine master plan, simply by showing 
that decisions about the future of libraries cannot be made because 
no one has made decisions about dozens of other things which will affect 
libraries, such as densities of population in certain areas, important 
new trafficways, and the rehabilitation or clearance and redevelopment 
of blighted areas. 

"Clearly, planning for library service is a co-operative process in 
which both librarians and city planners must participate. Librarians 
have every right to expect city planners to be able to provide infor- 
mation on the division of the city into living and working areas, on 
neighborhoods within the various residential districts of the city, the 
composition of the population within neighborhoods, population changes 
and shifts, measures being taken to arrest the spread of blight, traffic 
conditions on important thoroughfares, trends in the use of transit and 
the ownership and use of automobiles, and on dozens of other matters. 
If it is true, as William Chait, director of the Dayton and Montgomery 
County Public Library, says, that 'the success or failure of a library 
building . . . always rests on the intelligence with which the site has 
been chosen,' then knowledge of everything I have mentioned should 
influence the selection of a site. If the city planning department does 
not have analyses of many kinds of data and has not developed a 
j general scheme of land uses to guide future physical development, it 
; cannot competently assist the library board and the library staff in 
planning for areawide library service. 

' ' City planners, on the other hand, have every right to expect librar- 
ians to be able to state the goals of library service clearly, to have some 
''' idea of the standards they would like to establish, and to have arrived 
at tentative decisions about highly important questions; for example, 
whether a downtown library is to be limited in the future to fiction 
and popular nonfiction that circulate rapidly or is also to include the 
I major reference-research collection, administrative offices, and support- 
ing services. Standards and policy decisions may be modified while 
planning is in progress, but unless the librarians begin with some 
preliminary conceptions of what would be desirable, they will retard 
the whole effort and may not end with the kind of plan that really 
satisfies them. 

"I should expect librarians in various areas of a city to have as 
expert knowledge of the people in those areas as the planners, assuming 
the librarians have been doing a thoughtful job, studjdng the kinds of 



298 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES 

people who come to the librarj'' and the kinds of books they borrow, 
analyzing the kinds of reference questions they ask, noting how far 
away or how near they live, how frequently they visit the library, and 
what sorts of exhibits or lectures or discussion groups they attend. 

"If the librarians do not have such information in orderly form, 
they can obtain it without great difficulty. When the Nashville Public 
Library was engaged in preparing a long-range plan for areawide 
service, it conducted a survey by questionnaire among borrowers coming 
to the main library and the various branches. The staff of the advance 
planning division of the city planning department assisted in an ad- 
visory capacity. The survey developed information showing ' the pattern 
of library users, their age composition, their interests in the library 
program, and their attitudes concerning the existing library system 
and future facilities, in terms of physical location factors.' The results 
proved helpful in evaluating the existing system and in projecting a 
plan for locating needed branches. 

"The objectives of library service are very much the same every- 
where, but standards vary. Just as no two communities are alike, and 
no two neighborhoods within anj^ one community, so no two library 
systems should be alike or have the same standards. National standards 
should be merely the point of departure for the development of local 
standards. A few years ago I participated in a state-wide project to 
develop a basis for determining local recreation space standards for 
California communities. Recreation directors throughout the State had 
become dissatisfied with the standards of the National Recreation 
Association because Californians make greater use of the outdoors, 
demand more facilities, and require more space in which to play and 
relax. Personal interviews with recreation executives from San Diego 
to Eureka revealed the need for not one but six sets of standards to 
serve this State : standards for the coastal metropolitan areas, for the 
coastal nonmetropolitan areas, for the metropolitan areas of the Central 
Valley and for the nonmetropolitan areas of that region, and standards 
for the mountain areas and for the desert areas. In each of these gen- 
eral areas the pattern of recreation was different because of climate, 
the degree of urbanization, the occupational interests of the people, 
and other conditions. I suspect that a similar study made by California 
librarians might disclose the need for varying sets of library standards. 
Obviously, you cannot apply the same standards in some of the north- 
ern mountain counties that you would apply in the Los Angeles metro- 
politan areas; and surely you cannot apply the same standards in 
Fresno that you would apply in San Francisco. 

"Here is a statement of the Kern County Planning Commission 
which I think displays an intelligent approach to this matter of stand- 
ards. In a study for the determination of a desirable branch library 
site in the South Bakersfield Area, the commission observes : 

" 'The location of a branch library is a special problem related 
to local needs and local facilities. Branch library locations cannot 
necessarily be determined by sterotyped standards set forth by 
other cities for their specific needs, although the conclusions of 
other cities as to location, size, etc. are an invaluable guide by 
which to formulate our thinking. The service area of the proposed 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 299 

South Bakersfield Branch Library is not just a standard service 
area, but includes an urban, suburban, and rural population. 

" 'A branch library in the South Bakersfield Area will be 
largely dependent upon automobile customers. Some of the con- 
ventional standards based upon bus service, high-density resi- 
dential areas, . . . and an integrated street pattern cannot be 
considered. It must be assumed that almost all people patronizing 
this branch will drive by private cars and that the service area 
will be greater than the mile radius described in some reports for 
more compact urban areas. ' 

' ' No doubt that statement reflects the reasoning of the county librar- 
ians as well as the judgment of the county planners. 

"Since librarians in different parts of the United States have con- 
sidered distances varying from half a mile to two miles the desirable 
service radius of a branch library, there seems to be widespread real- 
ization of the need for modifying general standards to suit local con- 
ditions. Standards for floor space likewise vary. 

"The interesting thing about the recreation space standards we pro- 
posed for California was that, generally, they were higher than the 
standards of the National Recreation Association, but they seemed 
entirely reasonable to the majority of recreation directors in this State. 
Perhaps standards for California libraries also should be higher than 
standards for libraries elsewhere. I read an interview with Joseph 
Wood Krutch, the writer and critic, the other day in which he com- 
mented that the West Coast has a much richer cultural life than 
Arizona, where he is now living. But Krutch is not the first person to 
remark about the more highly developed interest in intellectual and 
artistic activities here on the West Coast. When Professor S. I. Hay- 
akawa, the semanticist, moved to San Francisco from Chicago a decade 
ago, he told an audience at the San Francisco Museum of Art that he 
found far more culture here than in the Midwest. Notwithstanding our 
heavy emphasis on material things, a large proportion of Californians 
do value the life of the mind and of the spirit, so much, indeed, that 
schools and libraries which might be deemed adequate in Georgia or 
Indiana are unsatisfactory here. Perhaps California librarians should 
examine the library standards being applied here to see whether they 
should be raised, especially since these standards will be used in plan- 
ning facilities that will have to meet needs twenty or thirty years 
from now. 

"Last year, as many of you know, I suggested that librarians of the 
San Francisco Bay Area should consider preparing a twenty-year plan 
for metropolitan-wide library service. A committee composed of mem- 
bers of the Grolden Gate District of the California Library Association 
has been appointed to take initial steps, and a few weeks ago I met with 
them to talk about setting some goals for regional service. Dr. Edward 
Wight, of the University of California School of Librarianship, com- 
piled various statistical tables on the libraries of the Bay Area for us 
to examine, including one table showing that the public libraries in the 
cities and counties of the metropolitan region now have an average of 
265 square feet of floor space per thousand population. In only two of 
the nine Bay Area counties does the average number of square feet of 



300 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

library floor space per thousaud population exceed 300 square feet, and 
in two others it is only a little more than 200 square feet. The commit- 
tee concluded, however, that by 1980 the averag'e throughout the metro- 
politan region should be 500 square feet ; and Mrs. Bertha Helium, head 
of the Contra Costa County Librar}?-, suggested that since public li- 
braries increasingly are going to become centers for a wide range of 
cultural activities, the goal probably should be 600 square feet.^ 

"EAJ-en the more modest figure of 500 square feet accepted by the 
majority of members of the committee is startling in its implications. 
All the public librarj^ buildings in the San Francisco Bay area together 
now include somewhat less than a million square feet of floor space. 
To meet the goal of 500 square feet per thousand population throughout 
the area, the total number of square feet in library buildings would 
have to be increased 1^ times — ^to approximately 2,500,000 square feet, 
since the Bay area may have a population of almost 5,400,000 in another 
18 years. The members of the committee, you see, are anything but 
pikers when it comes to bold projections. 

"Economic trends, however, justify audacious thought. Although 
economists grumble about our rate of economic growth and point out 
that Italy, West Germany, and some other nations of western Europe 
are expanding their economies at substantially higher annual rates of 
growth than we are ours, we nevertheless have made enormous gains 
just since World War II. The Bureau of the Census reported in Jan- 
uary (on the basis of a sample survey made in March 1961) that be- 
tween 1947 and 1960 average total family income in current dollars 
increased from $3,000 to $5,600, or by 85 percent. Between 1939 and 
1960 the median real wage and salary income of primary families 
doubled, rising from $2,700 to $5,400. If we continue to make similar 
gains, by 1980 we shall be an exceedingly wealthy nation, with far 
greater capacity to pay for governmental services than at present. 
Even if we' are obliged to go on allocating a high proportion of our 
national income to the production of nuclear armaments and the main- 
tenance of a far-flung military establishment, most families will have 
a larger percentage of income that could be spent for the good things 
of life, including education, recreation, and cultural activities. The 
question is : Will they prefer to ' live it up ' or to invest in self-develop- 
ment and all the institutions and facilities essential thereto? 

"I believe many people are already ashamed of having J. K. Gal- 
braith and others describe the United States as a land of 'private 
opulence and public squalor.' Though it will not be easy to induce 
Americans to take greater pride in public achievement, as the ancient 
Athenians did in the construction of the Parthenon and the embellish- 
ment of the Acropolis, I detect signs of a shift in attitudes. People are 
much more willing to pay user charges for the maintenance and devel- 
opment of national and state parks. More and more states are making 
appropriations for cultural programs. The State of New York now 
supports a traveling theater which offers performances in communities 
heretofore denied any acquaintance with the living theater. The Vir- 

1 The figure of 500 square feet per thousand is not to be applied to individual li- 
braries or even to all the libraries within one city. It is, rather, an indicator of 
regional needs ; the goal for total regional resources as measured against total 
regional population served. 



VOLUME ^'], NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 301 

ginia State Legislature this year appropriated $371,000 for the Virginia 
Museum of Fine Arts, so that it could send traveling art exhibitions 
to small cities and rural areas of the state. The Kentucky State Legis- 
lature has created a State Arts Council and has appropriated $240,000 
for a revolving fund to promote the native arts and crafts of that state. 
European governments have long subsidized the arts, but it is some- 
thing new to find state governments in this country willing to spend 
tax moneys for culture. From these small beginnings I foresee the 
development of impressive governmental support— local, state, and even 
national — of intellectual and artistic endeavor, particularly since the 
President himself has put culture on the front page. The beneficiaries 
of this national awakening to the importance of art as an essential of 
life will be not only the symphony orchestras, theaters, museums, and 
ballet companies of America but also the public libraries, the colleges 
and universities, and the cultural divisions of municipal recreation 
departments. 

"The new intellectual climate which will result from the growth of 
interest in music, literature, drama, dance, and the visual arts will, I 
assume, inevitably effect changes in the character of the public library. 
Librarians and planners have been saying for the past decade that a 
library building should be in a business district or a shopping center, 
where there are crowds of people, rather than in a park or a civic 
center or near a school. I talked with a museum director the other day 
who also wanted to move his institution from a civic center to a business 
district. But I foresee the development of a new kind of area that will 
likewise attract large numbers of people both in the daytime and at 
night : the cultural center. Westchester County, New York, has plans 
for one costing from $5,000,000 to $10,000,000. It will include facilities 
for art exhibitions and operatic, symphonic, dramatic, and dance pre- 
sentations, as well as workshops and studios. The project was inspired 
by the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City, 
which has aroused tremendous interest throughout the country in the 
possibility of grouping allied cultural enterprises on one ample, acces- 
sible site, not necessarily in the heart of the city. The shorter work week 
of the future, the longer annual vacation, and the leisure to move about 
more often in the total urban area should all contribute to great use 
of such centers, perhaps making them desirable places to locate branch 
libraries or even main libraries. 

' ' Suppose we consider a branch library in a cultural center. Its book 
collection would be selected to meet the needs of those frequenting the 
center : musicians, artists, actors, students, teachers, other professional 
people, and of course the general public. The library staff would be 
specialists in the literature of the arts. But this kind of library would 
not, I should think, attempt to provide space for the range of cultural 
activities that the ordinary community library will be required to 
provide in the future. The branch library in the cultural center, I 
assume, would share rooms for exhibitions, lectures, films, and other 
events with other institutions in the center. 

"If the idea of the cultural or community center becomes highly 
popular in the United States, we may see many smaller versions of it 
developing in outlying areas of metropolitan regions. There is already 
some evidence in the San Francisco Bay area, for instance, that resi- 

2—67626 



302 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBKAEIES 

dents of suburban and fringe areas want tbeir culture close to home. 
The San Francisco Symphony this year gave five performances in Los 
Altos, next year will give eight there. It also gave performances in 
Pittsburg in Contra Costa County and will appear there again next 
year. The central city no longer monopolizes artistic endeavor. A diffu- 
sion of culture is accompanying the growth of outlying communities, 
forcing us to consider the time when there will be many centers of 
cultural activity in our large urban areas. If the public library has a 
place in these new cultural centers, then it will probably require a 
different kind of planning than the library in a shopping center or 
business district. 

"In looking ahead and trying to foresee developments throughout 
metropolitan regions, we are a bit like prophets reading signs in the 
heavens. "We note trends; we assume that some project establishes a 
precedent for other similar projects; we tend to make facts out of 
hopes and predictions out of guesses. But actually we do not yet know 
what form the urban areas of the future will take. We are living in 
an era of transition, and the changes are coming with such bewildering 
speed that we cannot see clearly the direction in which they are taking 
us. But since the greatest growth is jet to be, city planners still talk 
hopefully of the possibility of making choices about the physical organ- 
ization of the urban environment. The choices will affect libraries as 
well as all other institutions in our society. 

"Urban areas alreadj^ are so spread out and their governmental, 
commercial, and industrial functions have already undergone so much 
dispersal that I should rule out any possibility of a single dominant, 
multipurpose center in most metropolitan regions, with all the sur- 
rounding areas dependent upon it for goods and services. For good 
or ill, I think the possibilities now are various forms of multifocal 
organization within the extensive urban area — either general dispersal 
with a multiplicity^ of small clusters of commercial, professional, and 
.governmental establishments, or a constellation of relatively self-suffi- 
cient subareas. The Los Angeles area, I believe, tends more and more 
to assume the latter form, in response to trends set in motion as long 
ago as the 1920 's. The San Francisco Bay area seems destined to have 
a concentration of specialized services somewhere in the San Jose area, 
more integrated older centers in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berke- 
ley, and important new concentrations of activities in eastern Contra 
Costa County and northern Sonoma County, around Santa Rosa. And 
since the planning for this metropolitan region apparently is going 
to receive the close attention of the city and county officials who have 
formed the Association of Bay Area Governments, I venture to say 
that they will favor a subregional scheme of physical development. 

"As I see it, we are going to need large libraries at several places 
in our urban areas, with branches related to each of them; something 
approximating the regional library system proposed for Philadelphia 
some years ago, only on a much grander scale. Fitting existing libraries 
into the seve'ral subregional patterns of service might be difficult. In 
any event, the decisions are not going to be entirely up to the li- 
brarians. Elected officials and regional planners probably will establish 
the overall physical framework within which many kinds of public 
services will be organized, including library service. Once the general 



VOLUME '>,'], NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 303 

scheme has been formulated, librarians will have opportunities to work 
with planners and elected officials to devise satisfactory patterns of 
library service. 

' ' The obstacle to devising a long-range metropolitan regional library 
plan for the San Francisco Bay area at this time is that the regional 
planning machinery has not yet been created, but it is, I am hopeful, 
about to be created. Nor has such machinery been created in any other 
metropolitan area in California. The city and county planning that is 
being done can be helpful to librarians only to a degree. In the absence 
of regional planning, it tends to be piecemeal planning. If librarians 
truly wish to develop library plans for their areas that will serve as 
valuable guides for the location and construction of everything from 
large facilities to the smallest branches, they should support movements 
for areawide planning. There is a good deal more agreement on the 
need for this type of planning than there is on the need for some form 
of areawide government in our large urban areas. Social agencies at- 
tempting to plan for the future desperately need areawide planning, 
in order to know where to locate many types of institutions. Hospital 
managers and physicians who are striving to work out long-range plans 
for hospitals, clinics, convalescent homes, and similar medical facilities 
tell me that one of the greatest handicaps to their work, in both the 
San Francisco Bay area and the Los Angeles area, is the lack of any 
form of genuine regional planning. Moreover, both the state and fed- 
eral governments are beginning to realize the need for areawide plan- 
ning. 

"Mr. Elton Andrews, of the State Office of Planning, no doubt will 
tell you later of a proposed division of the State into regions for plan- 
ning purposes. Many people in Sacramento and Washington, and in 
other capitals, have begun to advocate withholding state and federal 
grants to metropolitan regions until they do establish areawide plan- 
ning agencies. Some persons would go so far as to have the state and 
federal governments require metropolitan planning before program- 
ing any more important state and federal facilities in metropolitan 
areas. I doubt whether our State Legislature and the Congress are 
going to adopt these suggestions in the future, but you can be sure 
that when we do get a department of urban affairs (which, inciden- 
tally, most Americans favor, according to a recent Gallup poll), there 
will be great pressure on metropolitan areas to prepare long-range 
plans. To experts in the Bureau of the Budget, the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency, and many other agencies of the federal government 
it makes little sense to spend millions on federal projects in particular 
metropolitan areas with no assurance that the projects have been prop- 
erly located and will be of long-term usefulness. 

"In the meantime, we must rely upon city and county planning 
and, I think, upon more voluntary co-operation among city and county 
planning agencies in matters that affect a number of government juris- 
dictions. In areas in which several libraries wish to plan together for 
the future, and wish to be advised by the planners, informal joint 
planning is possible. "We have many examples in California of plan- 
ners from two, three, or four counties consulting with one another 
informally. The planning law, of course, provides for the establish- 
ment of area and regional planning commissions, though the present 



304 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

provisions rather deter areawide organization. Then there is another 
statute which allows a good deal of freedom of choice in approaching 
areawide problems. Under the Joint Exercise of Powers Act two or 
more governments may enter into an agreement to engage in almost 
any kind of activity already authorized by law. Where there is a will, 
there is a way. So we need not wait for full-scale metropolitan plan- 
ning, or for action by the state and federal governments. But neither 
should we lose sight of comprehensive, areawide planning as the long- 
term goal. Planning for libraries is not going to be so good as it might 
be until we do achieve that kind of planning." 



Mr. Scott's speech touched off a lively discussion, hj members of the 
listening panel and the audience, of librar}^ planning and librarj^ goals. 
Many of the points raised were brought out again and again through 
the program sessions. Participants ranged themselves pro and con the 
"library in the cultural center" concept, with some spokesmen urging 
that the primary role of the library is as a reference and information 
center and that the research and reference function may be over- 
whelmed by the recreation interests. On the other hand, it was pointed 
out that there can be a healthy exchange of patrons when library, 
auditorium, and art center are adjacent and closelj^ related. The library 
can serve as an agent to encourage the growth of cultural activities. 
There was general agreement that planning must be done from the 
situation, for the community; that the library is part of the whole life 
of the community, and is to serve everyone ; and that there is just so 
much monej^ and we have to produce the best possible programs within 
our means. 

Mr. Scott stated that the proposed Bay area library standards were 
designed for concentrated urban areas, and agreed that different quan- 
titative standards were needed for other kinds of communities. He 
outlined for the audience the method by which varying sets of recrea- 
tion standards were developed for California. Field workers surveyed 
present facilities by area, and interviewed every recreation director 
in the State on what was needed, by area. It was not a scientific survej', 
but a compendium of the considered judgment of experts in the field. 
It was suggested that a similar survey of library facilities and needs 
might also produce different and realistic sets of standards for urban 
and rural areas. 



VOLUME '>,']^ NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 305 



A POLITICAL SCIENTIST LOOK AT PLANNING 

Dr. Ernest G. Miller 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

University of California, Davis 

' ' My charge today is to take a look at comprehensive public planning 
from the viewpoint of a political scientist, and to share my observations 
with you. My remarks will range over matters that go beyond any 
narrow definition of planning, because from my viewpoint the measure 
of the planning service — whether it be local, regional, statewide, or 
national— is how it affects, and is affected by, its environment. If the 
planning activity is not measurably affecting its environment, it is not 
fulfilling its function, and I would argue that if the planning activity 
is not being affected b}^ its environment then it will indeed have little 
chance to make an impact on that environment. The environment to 
which I allude has many ingredients, but I believe that the most crucial 
one is the political environment, which includes politicians and the 
public. So my observations will take their bearings from the relation- 
ships of political science, planning, politics, and the public. 

"As a political scientist I see my role as being primarily that of an 
analyst and critic. It is my obligation to examine governmental or 
political phenomena for the purpose of increasing our knowledge and 
understanding of them, and to assess their effectiveness. Some of my 
colleagues argue that the political scientist's role ends with explanation 
and evaluation. But many students of politics also engage in prescrip- 
tion, in suggesting changes, or remedies, or new courses of action de- 
signed to improve the workings of government in some way. Today I 
am going to spend most of my time analyzing, criticizing, and evaluat- 
ing, but I am also going to present a few modest prescriptions. There 
is one thing I might confess parenthetically about political scientists 
and their prescriptions: they appear to be even less successful in their 
batting average than planners ! t 

"Let me go now to the heart of the matter. As this political scientist 
looks at public planning his overall evaluation is that planning is not as 
effective as most political scientists would like it to be, not as effective 
as most 'good government' organizations would like it to be, and cer- 
tainly not as effective as most planners would like it to be. Hardly a 
startling assessment, to be sure. But you will note that I did not flatly 
assert that planning was not effective nor that there was a universal 
agreement that planning should be more effective. There are some 
individuals and some organizations in our society who feel that there 
is too much planning and that it is very effective. Now, if you will 
grant me that I am not referring in either case to lunatic fringes who 
do not deserve our serious consideration, let me ask you : who is right, 
and who decides who is right? I hope this question tantalizes you! 
I'm not going to answer it now, and you'll just have to stick with me 
to the end to see if I answer it later. 



306 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

"Assuming then, that we are not among a lunatic fringe in thinking 
that the planning process is not as effective as it ought to be, what are 
some possible explanations for this relative ineffectiveness? 

"First, it appears to me that one all too frequent deficiency in plan- 
ning is that planners still tend to be hyper rational. This is a wholly 
natural behavior for the planner since his education and training en- 
courage him to see his role as that of an objective, professional, and 
technical man, in which his standard or guideline is the ideal of taking 
all factors into account in the making of public policy, and doing so 
systematically and with a long-range view. Not only do the education 
and training of the planner encourage a tendency to search for the 
ideal solution as the goal, but the usual relationships of the planning 
agency in the governmental structure, and the broad tasks assigned 
the agency in law, also reinforce the tendency of hyperrationality. And 
this tendency, it seems to me, leads to a conviction by the planner that 
his role places him above and beyond politics. 

"One approach that this conviction leads to is that the facts will 
speak for themselves. The 'facts-speaking-for-themselves' approach 
was characteristic of the work of many of the state planning agencies 
which were created in this country during the 1930 's. One of the most 
successful of those depression-bred planning agencies was the Wash- 
ington State Planning Council. During the period of its existence from 
1934 to 1945 it completed many outstanding studies in the area of 
natural resource conservation and development.^ A few of these studies 
led to recommendations which became public policy in the State, but 
a larger number simply became part of the state's archives. A major 
factor which I think prevented the council from having achieved a 
higher record of accomplishment was the attitude of the council mem- 
bers themselves : In the beginning they deliberately and consciously 
agreed that their purpose was to conduct research, draw conclusions 
from the research, and then let the facts of their studies speak for 
themselves. They not only felt that advocacy was beyond their proper 
role, but they were generally not disposed to give encouragement to 
others to initiate and advocate legislation based upon their studies. 
The policy of the council was to Stay as clean as a hound's tooth so 
far as politics was concerned. While the council itself was a lay board 
it nevertheless reflected what we may call the professional ethic of the 
planner. And I must conclude that this ethic, with its hyperration- 
ality tendency, may still be abroad in the land. Joseph E. McLean, a 
political scientist and recent commissioner of the New Jersey Depart- 
ment of Conservation and Economic Development, in a paper delivered 
at the 1957 meeting of the American Political Science Association, 
argued that the planner is tempted 

" 'to approach long-range problems with the unconscious attitude 
that the most satisfactory solution is what would seem to be the 
ideal solution. The failure to be aware of this temptation . . . may 
be one of the reasons that so many of the plans prepared for state 
and community development in the past have been academic blue- 
prints, which after once being aired were filed and forgotten. ' 

1 Information and interpretation of the character and workof the Washington State 
Planning Council is based upon the author's A.B. thesis, The Washington State 
Planning Council, Whitman College, 1951. 



VOLUME '^^^ NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 307 

"Another major encouragement to the planner's tendency to hyper- 
rationality and his consequent disdain for things political stems from 
the usual relationships of the planning agency in the governmental 
structure and the nature of the tasks assigned to it. Most often the 
planning agency is in a relationship of isolation, or semi-isolation, and 
it is charged with long-range, comprehensive tasks, not with immediate 
day-to-day tasks. Hence, again, the tendency of the planner to be 
overly rational in his approach is reinforced. As a professional he is 
inclined to prefer to talk with his fellow professionals, and his long- 
range assignment discourages him from rubbing elbows sympathetically 
with those who daily confront the myriad of current political pres- 
sures. The historical pattern of placing planning agencies in a some- 
what isolated position was deliberate, of course, with the intention of 
shielding their operations from current political pressures. But recog- 
nition of the fact that a deficiency in their effectiveness appeared to 
result from this shielding arrangement has led to a recent trend, 
especially evident at the state level, to bring the planning operation 
into closer relationship with current political decision-making by locat- 
ing the agency in a major line or staff department or in the chief 
executive 's office. California is a case in point : The State Planning 
Office is located in the Department of Finance, a staff department, and 
though there is an advisory committee there is not an independent 
policymaking board or commission that stands between the chief execu- 
tive and the planning staff. 

' ' So, what my criticism really comes down to is this : The planner 
must be receptive to his political environment. Receptivity alone, how- 
ever, is not enough. He must also become familiar with the political 
process and be a little more patient with the politicians that so often 
seem to resent and resist the splendid plans he devises. The planner 
should know that politics involves power and power relationships : men 
influencing other men to achieve things or conditions which they want, 
and that this process has as its end result the making of public policy. 
To be sure, sometimes certain politicians appear to be seeking power 
for very personal reasons, and we can deplore this use of political 
power. But for the most part the pulling and hauling, the fighting, 
the negotiating, the compromising, the influencing that goes on in the 
political process essentially reflects differences in social and economic 
interests and in cultural values and beliefs. In California, a hetero- 
geneous state undergoing rapid growth and change, a wide diversity 
of social and political policy preferences is inevitable, and the planner 
contributes an additional policy preference. The planner, too, is en- 
gaged in politics, and if he is going to be more effective he must recog- 
nize that he lives in a political world, that he surely works in a political 
world, and that his goals are effected in a political world by political 
means. 

''We can be sympathetic with the uneasiness of the planner who 
becomes aware of the political nature of his task. If it will help we can 
assure him that he is not alone nor professionally unique : The profes- 
sional city and county manager has also to learn to work in a political 
environment even though he is employed as a neutral civil servant 
who is expected to behave as if he heard no politics, saw no politics, and 
spoke no politics. I will repeat, then, that the planning process must 



308 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

become more closely related to current policymaking, and the planner 
must become more sensitive to the political, as distinguished from the 
technical, factors that are involved in policymaking if the planning 
process is to become more effective. And I can easily predict that if 
this new look for planning should come to pass, political pressures 
upon the planning process will increase. The planner won't like this; 
it will be frustrating. But I should think that this would not be too 
high a price to pay for the promise of increased effectiveness. After all, 
which is better : the frustration of political pressures and greater effec- 
tiveness, or less effectiveness and the frustration of plans 'filed and 
forgotten ? ' 

"At this point I shall make a modest and brief prescription: The 
educational preparation of planners should include more political 
science courses of the type that deal in depth with the political process. 
Just any old political science course will not do. 

"It is only fair for me to note now that the hope of greater planning 
effectiveness through changed planner attitudes and changed relation- 
ships of the planning agency may well be somewhat idealistic on my 
part. And it is only fair, after criticizing planners, to criticize the 
other two ingredients in the planning environment, the politician and 
the public. It is a bit more difficult to characterize politicians, or elected 
officials, because they represent a far wider range of interests, attitudes, 
and training than do the planners. But even at this obvious risk of 
excessive overgenerality I do want to make two categorical observations 
with respect to politicians and the planning process. 

' ' One is that the elected executive officer is likely to be the friendliest 
politician in the lot so far as the planner is concerned. In the first place 
his constituency is the community or the state as a whole, and his focus 
is more comprehensive and cosmopolitan, rather than parochial. In the 
second place, his need to develop an overall policy and a co-ordinated 
program in order to satisfy his large-scale constituency has the effect 
of sensitizing him to the merits of comprehensive, long-range planning. 
An example of such executive friendliness to planning was given by 
Governor Brown in his address to the February 1962, League of Cali- 
fornia Cities Conference on Metropolitan Issues. He said: 

" 'If growth is to mean progress — and not deterioration and 
decay — then we must meet it by effective planning and action. We 
must meet it soon. And we must meet it together with all the 
strength of our allied resources.' 

Then, after commenting on the fact that the staff of the State Office of 
Planning is being augmented to expedite progress on the State Develop- 
ment Plan, he said, 'I have been pleased to observe a quickening of 
interest in planning in recent months. We welcome this interest and 
want to encourage it.' And lest any of you mistake my motives, let me 
add that I would fully expect this kind of proplanning statement from 
any future Governor of California, Democratic or Republican. My only 
possible criticism here is that the executive may fail to match deeds 
with words, that he may find it easier to back down in the face of public 
apathy and special interest objections rather than to proceed vigorously 
and risk becoming a statesman without an office instead of a politician 
with an office. 



« 



VOLUME ^'J^ NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 309 

"With respect to the elected legislative policymaker, whether a state 
legislator, a county supervisor, or a local councilman, the planner will 
find him a less sympathetic politician. Of course there will be notable 
exceptions, but they will invariably be in the minority, and often in a 
pitifully small minority. The reason may be his orientation to the 
dominant pressures of his own narrower constituency, or the skeiDticism 
of one who is accustomed to working on limited and immediate prob- 
lems. Criticism of the legislative politician is a complicated matter. If 
he is simply being skeptical or cautious, exhibiting a ' show-me-more- 
evidence' attitude, this may be a virtue and not a vice. It all depends 
on the intelligence and amount of information possessed by the doubter. 
I, for one, do not assume that planners are infallible, since my operat- 
ing assumption is that no human can be presumed to be infallible. If he 
is reflecting the immediate interest of what is often called a vested 
minority which may be dominant in his constituency, this, too, may be 
legitimate. After all, our body politic consists of a vast array of minori- 
ties, and the task of democratic politics is to adjust or integrate these 
minority interests into governmental policy that hopefully will repre- 
sent the public interest. Sometimes, of course, particular minority 
interests must lose, at least in the short-run. But, again, it all depends 
on the issue, and I certainly do not mean to imply that all minority 
interests are legitimate. 

"If, on the other hand, the legislative politician is simply trying to 
protect his own vested interest in the power and glory of his own olSce, 
or if he thinks he represents constituency preferences when in fact he 
may not, then the planning process clearly is being unfairly resisted. 
These two conditions merit a moment's reflection. I have no idea, of 
course, how frequently the former condition exists, that of the politician 
whose dominant motive for resisting planning is self-interest. I doubt 
that the political scientist will ever be able to discover this kind of fact 
because I think it can be determined only through some sort of depth- 
psychology analysis. In any event, the only solution here is to bring 
strong constituency pressures to bear upon this rascal, and, if necessary, 
throw him out of office. The latter condition, where the politician thinks 
he represents his constituency's attitude, but may not, is a condition 
which I suspect is more common than we realize. Professor William 
Storm of the University of Southern California pointed to this dis- 
parity on the local level in his address at the 1961 Institute on Coopera- 
tive Planning for Public Libraries. Through survey research in 12 
Southern California communities he found that the 'general publics 
of most of these communities would go along with major modification 
of the status and configuration of their communities, ' although the local 
officials of such communities nearly always resist efforts to change the 
basic governmental relationships or shape of their own community.^ 

1 submit the hypothesis that an essentially similar disparity of prefer- 
ence may often exist between the politician and the general public in 
his constituency regarding many planning goals and proposals. If so, 
then the obvious conclusion for those who want more effective planning 
is that a way must be found to bring citizen groups into plaj" against 

2 William B. Storm, "Southern California Twenty-five Tears Hence," News Notes of 

California Libraries, Spring, 1961 — Part 2, p. 219. 



310 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

their elected politicians who are interested either in their own self- 
interest or in supporting the special interests who benefit from resist- 
ance to more effective planning. 

''But this remedy is not an easy one by any means. It brings us to a 
consideration of the role of the public in relation to comprehensive 
planning, and the characterization I would apply to the general public 
is that it is apathetic. To be sure, when Mr. Citizen's own immediate 
property interest is about to be adversely threatened he will bestir 
himself. But where broad matters of future public policy are concerned 
he tends to be indifferent. As Commissioner McLean said (in the ad- 
dress previously cited) : 

" 'Indeed, the problem of the organized minority promoting its 
interest at the expense of the unorganized majority is more serious 
in planning than in other fields of governmental activity. This is 
true in part because government, when engaged in the act of plan- 
ning, is usually looking down the corridor of time, seeking to assert 
its mastery over the future. The work of a planning agency is de- 
voted partially ... to unravelling some of the intolerable prob- 
lems belonging to the current state of affairs, and from time to 
time its findings and recommendations can stir broad public re- 
action. If it is assumed, however, that the leading function of a 
planning agency is to anticipate problems before they arise and 
to discover the best means of obviating them, it only follows that 
the agency will be dealing with many issues of little immediate 
concern to the typical citizen, living in a work-a-day world and 
wrestling with his own personal difficulties.' 

This general public apathy toward planning, however, would not pre- 
sent such a problem to the planner if there were a sufficient number 
of organizations, articulate and politically influential, which were de- 
voted to the encouragement and support of planning activities. At the 
moment, however, the number and power of the groups which support 
concepts of comprehensive planning are easily outnumbered by those 
which skillfully employ the myth of home rule, and even laissez faire, 
to obstruct serious planning efforts. 

"At this juncture in California's history it seems to me that one of 
the greatest challenges is to enhance planning operations throughout 
the State. There is no denying the fact that more effective planning on 
a statewide and regional scale is in order, and that leadership from the 
state level is essential. But the local levels, as well as the federal gov- 
ernment, are also involved, and the several levels of government and 
myriad of interests mean that there will be much disagreement and 
conflict. The basic task for California planning is to confront these 
conflicts, add the ingredient of communication, and hope that there 
will be the kind of compromise and co-operation that will bring all 
factors into account in the making of public policies that will bequeath 
a better and brighter California to its future generations. 

"The conflicts are trying, I know, and some would say that the 
simplest solution would be to turn totally to the state and federal gov- 
ernmental levels, ruthlessly emasculate the many local units, and then 
fashion a neater and more efficient nonduplicating, nonoverlapping 



VOLUME '^J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 311 

scheme of streamlined government. But we know this is not politically 
possible nor, some would argue, is it even particularly wise as a method 
in our democratic and pluralistic culture with its valued pattern and 
tradition of local self-government. But the extreme of governmental 
proliferation and fragmentation is equally indefensible, and somewhere 
between these extremes lies the possibility of constructive co-operation 
through increased and more comprehensive communication leading to 
honest compromise; that is, through an educational process aimed at 
achieving more effective intergovernmental co-operation in taking all 
factors into account in the making of public policy. 

"What, then, might we do to focus local, county, regional, and state- 
wide attention upon the need for more effective planning? What might 
we do as a co-operative step to mobilize the interest and support of 
government and civic organizations at all governmental levels in the 
pursuit of more effective planning? We could do this: we could strike 
out boldly and build upon the intrastate planning regions in the fol- 
lowing manner : 

(1) We could create in each region a leadership organization which 
would have advisory powers. Each would be called a regional plan- 
ning Council, with a further title identification appropriate to the 
region concerned. Now if these councils are to be educational as well 
as advisory, they must be widely representative of the various principal 
units of government concerned, and if they are widely representative 
there would be far too many members for each council as a body to be 
anything but a mass audience. Therefore, each council should be 
divided into 

(2) four or five area or district planning councils. The membership 
of these area councils would consist of elected officials and planning 
officers. Thus the area councils might consist of one elected official each 
from the counties, cities, and independent special districts, plus a 
planning officer from each county and city. At this level there would 
be basic discussion of the regional problems and selection of represen- 
tatives to the regional council. 

(3) The State, by representatives from the executive branch and 
the Legislature, would be represented in each area as well, and it would 
be hoped that there could be representation on the regional councils 
from the federal governmental agencies which operate directly in each 
region. 

(4) A secretariat to serve the council and areas. The State Planning 
Office is a logical unit for this role. The secretariat would prepare an 
agenda of regional problems and tasks and the next step would be an 
intensive discussion in the various areas, followed by conclusions and 
recommendations regarding programs of co-ordination or co-operative 
action that are needed to assure that each region was 'taking all fac- 
tors into account in the making of public policy.' Finally, representa- 
tives of each regional council would meet a statewide planning con- 
ference to discuss statewide issues that emerge from the regional dis- 
cussions. 

"Is this proposal too grandiose? Is it politically impracticable? 
Would it be a futile waste of time and effort ? Is it unwise in that local 



312 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES 

efforts may even now be too much of a bottleneck in the path of more 
efficient state and federal action, and that such a proposal as this would 
only hinder rather than help progress ? Or is it just the kind of dra- 
matic effort that might 'stir broad public reaction' and contribute sig- 
nificantly to an improved environment for planning in California?" 



In the subsequent question and answer period, Dr. Miller made these 
additional points. Special interest groups such as Leagues of Women 
Voters and library associations can help bring planning into action, 
through an organized approach to elected officials, through program 
focus on planning, and by stirring public interest and reaction. Or- 
ganized citizens can be more effective than citizens acting individually. 

The current climate is not conducive to planning, although the po- 
tential is there. Commercial special interests often run counter to plans 
made in the long-range public interest, and this competition goes on 
against a background of general public apathy. In view of this apathy, 
leadership must come from the top, for the present. The proposed 
regional planning must be begun on the state level and organized on 
down, to stir citizens into concern and action. 



PANEL: PLANNING ON THE STATE LEVEL 

Moderator: Mrs. Phyllis I. Dalton, Assistant State Librarian 
Panel Participants: 

Mrs. Carma R. Leigh, State Librarian 

Mr. Elton Andrews, State Planner 

Mr. Jack Merelman, Legal Counsel, County Supervisors' 

Association 
Mr. Don Benninghoven, Field Representative, League of 
California Cities 

Mrs. Dalton introduced the topic of planning for libraries by recount- 
ing recent personal experience in the Sacramento area. As an interested 
citizen and resident of the Natomas area, she had attended meetings of 
the Sacramento City Planning Commission held for discussion of Na- 
tomas area development plans. The plans were well designed in general, 
and there was considerable public interest in area development because 
of a proposed county airport. However, library services were given 
disappointingly small attention in the general plan. At present the 
nearest service point is a distant branch. The development plan calls 
for one main library and three branches for an expected 200,000 popu- 
lation in the area of 28 square miles. These recommendations are tucked 
in under "other public facilities" in a large subsection on recreation. 
This reflects the attitude of many planners. One may say of numerous 
comprehensive plans that library planning is there, but . . . 

Mrs. Dalton introduced the panel members as speakers who would 
consider planning and libraries from an overall, statewide viewpoint. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 313 

Mrs. Carma B. Leigh 

California State Librarian 

"The need for planning on the state level for library development 
is so great that it should be obvious. It would seem we should be much 
further along in this library planning than we are. As many of you 
know, a start has been made on a long-range plan, or program, for 
public library development throughout California. It has been slow in 
coming, and a great deal more remains to be done on the long-range 
program than has been so far accomplished. It must include action 
plans for implementation. 

''This proposed statewide program emphasizes that the numerous 
plans that must be made for local library development in California 
must continue to be made, as in the past, by local people directly 
responsible for local library service. The library profession, however, 
has a responsibility to our State and its residents to indicate directions 
in which the existing public libraries, and new libraries that may be 
formed, may move to serve more satisfactorily the complete library 
needs of the people of California. 

"An overall statewide action program for public library development 
is a logical, and, I believe, inescapable next step for California. 

"In addition, a long-range plan for the State Library is needed, and 
we have begun, barely begun, to write down such a plan. This plan, 
and the statewide plan for development of the entire public library 
system of California should fit together. Other types — all types — of 
California libraries should and do play important parts in the complete 
provision of library materials to the entire citizenry of the State. Col- 
lege and university librarians are working on a master plan; school 
librarians have begun a School Library Development Project. Eventu- 
ally, all these should comprise a total program. 

"We have not been totally without plans, of course. Each library's 
annual budget program request is a plan, obviously. But the annual 
plans must fit into a long-range program, so as to be understood well, 
and so that the overall view will be unobscured by the exigencies of 
the moment. 

"Nearly 10 years ago the California library profession began to take 
some important steps that are part of long-range planning. These lay 
the foundation for us to go forward on a more definite and specific 
program for library development. In 1953, at workshops sponsored by 
the State Library and in co-operation with the California Library Asso- 
ciation, we developed minimum standards of public library service for 
California. At the same time, we began work toward a statewide survey 
of the public libraries of the State. The purpose was to survey and 
analyze the facts and needs of our public library system, including 
the State Library. This survey was finally achieved, and its report was 
published in 1959. Serious discrepancies between existing library con- 
ditions and established minimum standards were found. Several pro- 
posals to remedy these conditions were made, and some things have been 
achieved as the result of the survey. At the same time, some individual 
libraries and library systems have been measuring themselves against 
minimum standards, but not a great deal of progress has been made. 
Population growth and other problems have caused more deterioration 



314 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

in our library system. What appears to be needed is a broad program 
for library development, a program that is fully understood by all 
librarians, and by other officials and the public as a whole. 

"The now tentative draft of a Proposed Program for PuMic Library 
Development sets the broad goal of complete provision of library mate- 
rials to our entire citizenry, and calls attention to basic shortcomings. 

(1) The number of books per capita now available in our public 
libraries declined 31.5 percent between 1940-41 and 1956-57, a 
drop to the level of the fiscal year 1920-21. Many important 
published materials are not being added either to local libraries 
or to the State Library. 

(2) Forty-five percent of central public library buildings are over 
38 years old. 

(3) Over 100,000 Calif ornians have no local public library service 
at all. 

(4) Public library service is very unequal in scope and quality, from 
place to place, and it is only nominal for hundreds of thousands 
of people in metropolitan suburban areas having libraries but 
little or no actual library service. 

(5) More than 25 percent of the recorded use of the larger central 
libraries is by nonresidents, nearly always without any compen- 
sation to the libraries used. 

(6) The use made by nonresidents of the larger, stronger, libraries is 
primarily of reference and research materials of a type that 
could not possibly be offered in smaller libraries. This in-library 
use is not reflected in library circulation figures, nor is it paid 
for, although it usually requires more expert staff and time, and 
more extensive and more costly books and materials than the 
normal unit costs of circulating books for home use. 

(7) Among nonresident library users primarily interested in re- 
search, the survey found a significantly higher proportion of men 
and of persons employed in the professions. These proportions 
tended to be largest in the libraries with outstandingly large 
resources, and to fall significantly with decrease in library 
resources. 

"Not just women and children, but men, professional people, and 
the whole population will use good libraries. The libraries must be de- 
pendable sources of a very wide range of books, information, and serv- 
ices, and they must have ready, unlimited access to materials not in 
their own collections. 

"The proposed program describes the basic elements of library serv- 
ice — books, personnel, buildings and equipment, and service programs — 
and what quality they should be. It proposes ways by which these ele- 
ments of good library service can be provided in California; it dis- 
cusses financial support — where the money must come from; and it 
makes recommendations for immediate and long-range action to achieve 
the program. 

"The proposed program notes a special and compelling problem, 
the great increase— 94 percent in 10 years — in children and young 
people of school age in California's population. It calls attention to 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 315 

the crisis caused by the excellent method of teaching in schools and 
colleges which requires students to read a wide variety of books related 
to subjects being studied rather than to rely on the use of single text- 
books. The library materials required by this method of teaching, how- 
ever, have not been supplied in the schools, and the pressure on public 
libraries to supply them is acute. It is not an easy problem to solve. 
The 'program states that public libraries are forced now and will in- 
creasingly be required to meet the library needs of young people, not 
only for personal reading but also for school-connected uses. Public 
libraries, with only local financial support of very limited amounts, are 
being forced to supply /ree school library service to local public schools 
which are 45 percent state supported. More libraries, more books, and 
more librarians are needed in both elementary and secondary schools, 
and public libraries need better organization and support for their 
services to children and young people. 

"The program proposes a series of four related, co-operating, and 
greatly strengthened library resources : community libraries ; local li- 
brary systems ; State Library service centers ; and the California State 
Library. 

"You will have to read the program for its detailed proposals, and 
be prepared to offer suggestions both on its principles and on its specific 
recommendations. It is to come before the California Library Associa- 
tion at its fall meeting for possible adoption and implementation. 

"As we began our work on the long-range plan for the State Library, 
we had a consultant from another state department meet with us on 
our methods. He outlined for us six steps in developing a plan and 
tieing it to action : 

1. Define goals. 

2. Review and make a preliminary evaluation of present activities. 

3. Make basic studies; the fundamental work that can lead to major 
changes. 

4. Make the basic plan, with two main projections : what the prob- 
able short-range accomplishments will be; and, what the accom- 
plishments really ought to be. (Our consultant said this creates 
the well-known 'planning gap.') 

5. The next step is 'closing the planning gap' ; studying the methods 
of improvement of the operation, new services, looking at all the 
alternatives, and choosing the best course of action. 

6. Extension and improvement of planning is the final step in the 
comprehensive long-range planning process : extending the plan- 
ning period farther into the future, carrying the planning deeper 
into the organization, increasing the involvement of staff, and im- 
proving the planning technique. 

"As we work with the librarians of the State on the long-range pro- 
gram for public and other library development in California, and as 
we take our first, shaky steps toward a long-range plan for the State 
Library itself, we are glad to have the opportunity to participate with 
you in this planning workshop." 



316 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Mr. Elton B. Andrews 

State Planning Officer 

The State Office of Planning was created in 1959, within the Depart- 
ment of Finance. The office is aided by a planning advisory committee 
whose members are appointed by city and county officials. The staff is 
small now, but in recognition of the importance of planning, it is cur- 
rently being augmented and will be further increased in 1962-63. With 
an enlarged staff we hope to do a more effective job. 

We are charged with four major functions: the preparation, mainte- 
nance, and revision of the State Development Plan; co-ordination of 
state, federal and local plans ; local planning assistance ; and the carrj'-- 
ing out of physical plans and co-ordination of studies. We are also to 
report to the Governor on the physical growth of the State. 

Our local planning assistance program means in effect that we make 
planning grants to cities and counties for plans under such projects 
as urban renewal and redevelopment. I hope that in these plans li- 
braries are placed between the corporation ^'•ard and the fire station 
only in the text and not in physical reality. 

For State Development Plan purposes, the State is divided into re- 
gional planning areas. In order to develop a reasonable plan, you must 
know how many people you are going to serve, where they are, and 
what kinds of activities they are engaged in. These regional divisions 
are not made for the purpose of regional planning as such, but as aids 
to bring much local planning together with state planning. The obvious 
point of contact between the locality and the State is the region; the 
San Francisco Bay area and the San Joaquin Valley are examples. 
The regional division is a special scheme by which we may better 
analyze the State, and should not be confused with true regional plan- 
ning. We encourage regional planning, but it is not our job at the pres- 
ent time to engage in it. 

We need state planning and regional planning in all the major areas 
of California, to facilitate, among other things, better planning for 
library service in all localities. There is much to be done in California 
although we can also say that we are doing as much now as any other 
state. 

We hope to develop subregions also, as an aid to procedures. The 
smaller the unit, the more possible it is for groups to recognize their 
common interests. We do not believe that planning direction should 
come from above, from the state level, at this time, but should come 
up from the localities involved. 

Regions are vital in planning, and there is a real need for everyone 
concerned to work together to create regional plans. We cannot plan for 
public library facilities in a metropolitan area, any more than we can 
plan transit, or control air pollution, unless the area can \, considered 
as a unit. Some service areas are logically wide by nature. We have to 
recognize that different people use different libraries at various times 
of the day. We have to recognize that people cross metropolitan lines 
as they go from home to work, and back. These facts are being recog- 
nized and there is increasing interest in regional development among 
both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan area residents. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 317 

COUNTIES AND THE NEW CONCEPT OF PLANNING 
FOR THE "COMPLETE MAN" 

Jack M. Merelman 

Legal Counsel 

County Supervisors Association of California 

''There is something new afoot in the field of planning. It is a new 
dimension which is partly seen and partly felt; an emerging concept 
whereby planning seeks to meet the cultural, social and aesthetic needs 
of man as well as his physical and environmental needs. For jast a few 
moments this afternoon, I would like to discuss with you this apparent, 
new concept of planning for the 'complete man' and to point to some 
of the early signs of movement in that direction. 

"Traditionally, the general public thinks of planning in terms of 
the basic, 'bread-and-butter' components of a comprehensive master 
plan : the zoning ordinance and the subdivision control ordinance. The 
leading case of Euclid v. Awibler Realty Company, 272 U.S. 365 (1926) 
served as the springboard for energetic development and refinement of 
zoning ordinances by holding that a zoning ordinance is constitutional 
in principle as a valid exercise of the police power when reasonably 
related to the public health, safety, morals, or general welfare. As the 
law has developed, the great body of cases have gone on to hold that 
zoning regulations must be promulgated 'in accordance with a com^pre- 
hensive plan' to provide for the use and development of property ac- 
cording to present and future public needs. That phrase 'in accordance 
with a comprehensive plan' has been picked up as the title of countless 
articles and special papers in the planning and zoning field and has 
echoed do'WTi over the years as a firm reminder that zoning is but one 
consideration in comprehensive planning. The question of how 'compre- 
hensive ' the comprehensive plan may or should be in the public interest 
remains with us. The answer to the question involves an enlarging 
concept as we move closer and closer to planning for the 'complete 
man.' 

"From the early days of Euclid v. Ambler, where we were concerned 
with controlling the use of land so as to regulate uses which were in- 
congruous or offensive one to the other, and so as to reduce population 
density and all of the sanitation and health problems that go with it, 
we have moved into a new era of refinement which has brought into 
play aesthetic considerations in zoning. Having planned for the con- 
struction of a vitally needed sewage treatment plant to meet the physi- 
cal needs of the people we now ask how it will look. Will it be offensive 
to the eye? Will it emit noxious odors or bothersome noises? Based on 
aesthetic considerations, a community will ask if it is intolerably dis- 
concerting tf 'the eye when two residences, although they may be com- 
pletely adeqJSte from a health and structural standpoint, stand side 
by side in harsh, ugly similarity or dissimilarity ? The cases have tended 
to hold that a zoning ordinance based solely on aesthetic considerations 
is an invalid exercise of the police power. On the other hand, the courts 
have also indicated that aesthetic considerations are entitled to some 
weight along with other valid considerations in determining the reason- 
ableness and validity of a zoning regulation. Moreover, there are some 

3 — 67626 



318 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

recent developments in the law which point to a trend toward judicial 
approbation of zoning ordinances based solely upon aesthetic consid- 
erations. 

"Thus it is seen that the zoning apparatus is being reshaped into 
an alignment more sympathetic with the broad responsibility of plan- 
ning to concern itself with the wholesome and orderly development of 
the whole community, including such elements as civic beauty, traffic, 
parks and streets. A second important case, Berman v. Parker 348 U.S. 
326 (1954) gave us a keen insight as to what we might expect in the 
future. There, in upholding the District of Columbia Redevelopment 
Act of 1945 the United States Supreme Court said: 'The concept of 
the public welfare is broad and inclusive. The values it represents are 
spiritual as well as physical, aesthetic as well as monetary. It is within 
the power of the Legislature to determine that the community should 
be beautiful as well as healthy, spacious as well as clean, well-balanced 
as well as carefully patrolled.' 

''And now, in recent years, there is evidence that federal, state, and 
local policymaking bodies are rethinking their responsibilities for pro- 
viding a vibrant cultural and social environment through the planning 
mechanism, as well as an environment physically wholesome and 
aesthetically agreeable. There are some indications that we are coming 
to think along the lines that government does have responsibility to 
assure that a community, in addition to providing a healthy environ- 
ment and pleasing aesthetics, should provide the cultural, educational 
and social values which meet the needs of the spiritual or inner man. 
When planning is developed to this level we will then be considering 
all of the basic and important needs of our citizens. 

"There are many recent 'tip-offs' that the public will support legis- 
lative bodies in doing 'complete man' planning. Look at the keen com- 
petition among cities and among counties, not only here in California 
but across the nation, to attract industry. The rule of thumb has always 
been that industry, in selecting a site, will look for transportation, 
water, a supply of trained personnel, a low tax base, etc. The interesting 
development is that industries themselves have now told government 
that while they are still very much interested, of course, in these tradi- 
tional allurements, they want to move to a community offering its 
family of employees the kind of planning which will give them an 
adequate library system, a good school system, a community symphony 
orchestra and theater, art museums and other cultural benefits. The 
attractive brochures which many of our counties have developed will 
attest to the fact that the county fathers are attuned to the demand 
for these broad educational advantages. 

' ' The library is certainly a vital and indispensable part of ' complete 
man' planning and several encouraging developments in recent years 
with reference to the library in California point to a conducive atmos- 
phere for this important new role of planning. Note these develop- 
ments: the Community Services Districts Law specifically authorizes a 
district 'to acquire sites for, construct, and maintain library buildings, 
to co-operate with other governmental agencies for library service.' 
(Government Code Section 61600.) 

"The County Service Area Law was recently amended to provide, 
specifically, that 'the board of supervisors of any county is authorized 



VOLUME <^^, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 319 

to establish and maintain . . . extended library facilities and services 
within any county service area established for that purpose.' (Govern- 
ment Code Section 25210.78.) 

''The Local Planning Law now provides that 'a master or general 
plan may include a public buildings element of the plan, showing loca- 
tions and arrangements of civic and community centers, public schools, 
libraries, police and fire stations, and all other public buildings, includ- 
ing their architecture and the landscape treatment of the grounds.' 
(Government Code Section 65470.) 

"And finally, look at the mandate to the State Planning Office. The 
law requires that 'the office shall prepare and thereafter maintain, 
regularly review and revise a comprehensive, long-range, general plan 
for the physical growth and development of the State. This plan, which 
shall be known as the State Development Plan, shall be based on studies 
of physical, social, economic and governmental factors, conditions and 
trends, in co-operation with and utilizing the physical development 
plans as prepared by state, local, regional and federal agencies; and 
shall aim at the co-ordinated physical development of the State in 
order to promote the general welfare and prosperity of its people.' 
(Government Code Section 65015.1.) 

"A library system is the rock-ribbed foundation of any 'complete 
man' plan for our cultural, spiritual and educational needs. When so 
much recent attention has been given to the plight of the library in 
California — and when there is so much late interest in developing our 
library system — there is reason to interpret this as a trend toward 
'complete man' planning. 

"And perhaps this general awareness that an adequate library sys- 
tem must be a first and foremost part of any adequate comprehensive 
plan has come not a moment too soon. One librarian has pointed to the 
desperate situation with this dramatic observation : ' The libraries 
have entered their golden age. No wonder there are massive pressures 
on them, pressures which stem from higher educational levels, more 
young people, greater leisure, shorter work weeks, higher earnings, 
j heavier demands for continuing self -education, and vocational guidance 
for technologically displaced workers. 

" 'If we are to cope with the crises which beset our society our 
library collection must grow as fast as knowledge and education 
grow ; much faster than the simple rate of population gain. Libraries 
must follow educated families to the suburbs. Twenty-five million 
Americans have no library service. Fifty millions more have 
inadequate service.' 

"I would gather, then, that while this may be the 'golden age' for 
libraries in terms of need and demand for library services it is not the 
'golden age' from the standpoint of availability of facilities. The same 
librarian goes on to bemoan the fact that: 'Many public libraries un- 
fortunately are dingy barns. Numerous communities provide better 
facilities for factory workers, bowlers, diners and bibbers than for 
students. This is changing, thank heaven, but not fast enough ! 

"Yes, it is clear that libraries still have a long way to go to satisfy 
their real purpose but with so much need and with so much demand we 



320 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

must anticipate that 'complete man' planning will soon begin to catch 
np. County government, I think, senses that there is something in the 
wind — something that is good — something that we will want to be a 
part of. 

"To assist counties in this bold new task I am extremely pleased to 
relate that the Government Operations Committee of our Association 
has recently take official action recommending to our Board of Direc- 
tors that a standing advisory committee on libraries be created within 
the committee structure of the County Supervisors Association of Cali- 
fornia. This vital recommendation comes out of a long series of discus- 
sions between your own State Librarian, Mrs. Carma Leigh, and the 
officers of my Association and on several delightful occasions the Gov- 
ernment Operations Committee has been privileged to have Mrs. Leigh 
as its guest and honored speaker. It is quite apparent that in addition 
to her other manifest charms and abilities, Mrs. Leigh is a disarmingly 
pursuasive advocate. But then, Mrs. Leigh has a wonderful product to 
sell — a library. 

"We now look forward to a period of increased co-operation and 
mutual endeavor with the library family in California. Let us hope that 
our joint efforts will place libraries at the very foundation of 'complete 
man' planning for social, cultural, and educational values." 

THE TEAM APPROACH TO LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT 

Don Benninghoven 

Field Representative 
League of California Cities 

"Effective long-range planning for the physical development of our 
State is unmistakably one of the most complex and yet vital functions 
of government today. This is true at every level— federal, state, county 
and, finally, city— but it takes on a unique significance at the local 
level, for cities and counties are unavoidably involved in the control 
of land use, one-half of which is devoted to public facilities and one- 
half to the private sector. True, land use planning is not an innovation. 
California first passed the City Planning Enabling Act in 1917 but its 
acceptance is new; not for professional planners and planning commis- 
sioners, but for the recipients of good planning : the mayors, council- 
men, department heads, public and, of course, the library service, as 
evidenced by this workshop. 

"The value of physical planning was slow to be realized, following 
two hundred years after the creation of one of our first libraries, Ben- 
jamin Franklin's Discussion Club in 1727. Even today, accepted plan- 
ning principles are not uniformly practiced by the 377 cities ; however, 
there are few local government officials who reject the need for syste- 
matic growth of our communities through local government guidance 
and control. 

"That today will be yesterday tomorrow is obvious in California. 
Somehow cities must expand and extend water, sewer and utility lines, 
provide recreation facilities, fire and police stations, and streets to 
accommodate the 1,200 newly registered vehicles daily that descend 



VOLUME '^J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 321 

on inadequate city streets from 6 and 8 lane freeways. It is also self- 
evident that only through realistic planning can the library program 
provide its cultural, educational and recreational services for the 
community. It has been well documented by Mel Scott and others 
that the increase in leisure time, the mobility of the individual, and 
the desire for self-education and political and social awareness have 
resulted in a broadening of the library role in the community. This 
broadening of the library concept has necessitated an expansion of the 
library planning program, for planning must go beyond the future 
location of library facilities in the general plan. A more appropriate 
definition of planning might be that of private industry management 
which includes forecasting — setting of goals — programing — schedul- 
ing — and budgeting. 

"It is not difficult to forecast that California's permanent population 
will continue to grow at one person a minute, or by the more current 
figure, used by the State, of fifty persons each one-half hour. But relat- 
ing growth figures to a specific city is an infinitely more complex issue. 
Many Bay area cities are experiencing a steady decline in population 
while others are expanding at a rate not equaled by California cities 
elsewhere. All of us are aware of the shifting population both statewide 
and locally. Oakland's two million dollar Ford Foundation Grant to 
study the social implications of community development gives an 
excellent example of the impact of large newcomer populations. This 
shifting of population prompted a Southern California Mayor to 
remind one of our Peninsula Mayors that a great many residents of 
San Francisco were moving to the Los Angeles area because of more 
desirable living conditions. The local Wajor promptly admitted that 
this was true but the result was good for it was undoubtedly increas- 
ing the intelligence level of both areas. So perhaps the public's in- 
tellectual curiosity is another consideration in forecasting the future 
needs of the library program. 

"Setting goals and objectives is the second phase of management 
planning that cities have accomplished in various ways. In recent 
years several city councils have adopted policy statements outlining 
the goals of the community, 10, 15 or 20 years into the future. These 
statements ideally outline the street, recreation, public works and 
library needs in relation to the development of the city. For example, 
outlying communities in the metropolitan areas often wish to attract 
industry which eventually will affect all of the services provided by 
the city. The adoption of acceptable goals for a community requires 
the co-operation of all municipal departments. The libraries that have 
been particularly successful in furthering their programs have done 
so by co-operating with other city departments in developing an overall 
community approach which recognizes the relative merit of each 
service. 

' ' This statement applies even more directly to the next phase of man- 
agement planning; that of programing. The general plan is probably 
the single most important long-range policy statement of the city and 
rightfully requires adoption by the city council. It is an expression of 
the community's growth pattern and as such deserves the attention 
and support of the library program. These plans are normally reviewed 



322 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

annually and are modified according to the desires of the commnnity 
and the action of the city council. It is both in the preparation of the 
general plan and in its review that the library service can play an 
important role in creating understanding and acceptance for its long- 
range facility location program. The legislative function of a city is 
centralized in the city council so that municipal services can be re- 
viewed in relation to each other. The city council can become an impor- 
tant factor in encouraging community sentiment for libraries. 

"The fourth area of management planning which deserves attention 
is scheduling. The capital improvement budget of a city, again like 
the general plan, is adopted by the city council and indicates a pri- 
ority list of capital improvement projects. Such a budget enables a 
city to stage the development of needed capital improvements, provide 
adequate financing and establish a timetable for completion. It also 
draws attention to the need for operating revenue and permits the 
city to plan its expenses accordingly. Thus, the construction of a new 
library in five years also requires staffing which must be considered in ' 
respect to the overall financial burden over the same period of time. 
The capital improvement budget provides for the utilization of all 
possible revenue resources by committing the funds in advance to 
specific approved projects. It is not uncommon for a city to pool sales 
taxes, parking meter revenues, general fund moneys, motor vehicle in- 
lieu funds and liquor license fees in the capital improvement fund for 
the financing of library facilities as well as other vital improvements. 

"The league recently conducted a survey on the means of financing 
capital improvements and discovered that of the 53 cities which have 
constructed one or more libraries in the last five years, 20 have financed 
these libraries through the capital improvement fund. Such financial 
support is not always easy to achieve, as you all know. Local financing 
is slow, cumbersome and complex but at the same time responsible to 
the people who will be using the facility, and extremely broad. But the 
combined use of taxes through the capital improvement fund is not 
the only way cities have budgeted for the expansion of their library 
program. Of these same 53 cities, 15 financed the construction of their 
library buildings on a pay-as-you-go basis through current operating 
revenues, 13 resorted to general obligation bonds and five used the 
lease purchase method. All of these financing means require action 
of the council or electorate. The demand for the service must come 
from the users, not those directly involved in providing the service. 

"Cities throughout the State have recognized this fact and have en- 
couraged participation in the library program. They have requested 
assistance in the formulation of library policy and have given both 
the city council and the people the recognition and the feeling of re- 
sponsibility for the library program. Virtually unlimited funds are 
available through the city council and electorate. Authorization is pro- 
vided in the statutes for general law cities to levy a tax in excess of the 
dollar limit for library purposes. Some charter cities have unlimited 
taxing authority. But the taxing authority is vested in the people and 
it is local government's obligation to inform these citizens of our 
service and facility deficiencies and to develop a better understanding 
of the value of the library service." 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 323 

In the following discussion period, panelists answered the following 
questions : 

What specific proposals has the State in mind for regional planning, 
and how would these work? 

Mr. Andrews: State law at present provides that once regional 
boundaries have been designated on the recommendations of the Plan- 
ning Advisory Committee, regional planning commissions may be 
formed. The jurisdictions in the region, cities and counties, would es- 
tablish the commissions and decide how they wish to support the work. 
Commission representatives are to be appointed by boards of super- 
visors in the case of counties and by the mayors of cities. The financing 
of such a program is left to the decision of the participant jurisdictions. 

There are two other legal means by which district or regional plan- 
ning can be done in California. The Joint Exercise of Powers Act 
enables any two jurisdictions which can come to an agreement to do 
joint planning to do so. This method has been used to a limited degree 
up to now. Second, any two counties can form a planning district and 
levy a tax to support it. This method has not yet been utilized. 

Isn't lease purchase heing attacked in the courts? 

Mr. Benninghoven: It is being challenged in courts and also at the 
state legislative level. The best present answer is to work to get the 
two-thirds majority rule on bond issue elections reduced. The League 
of California Cities supports such a step, and is suggesting that the 
majority vote requirement be lowered to 60 percent favorable. 

If libraries are "rock rih" institiitions, why is it so difficult to get 
them adequately supported? 

Mr. Merelman: The situation is improving. There is an increased ac- 
ceptance of social and cultural needs concepts by governing officials. 
Zoning by aesthetic standards will in time lead to zoning for the com- 
plete man. Secondly, the broadening scope of planning may contribute 
to broadened outlooks. Localities have discovered that smog knows no 
boundaries. This forces them to begin to look beyond the city lines; 
and one broad look may lead to another. 

Are planning hearings of general interest? Do many people attend? 

Mr. Andrews: There are controversies on plans for the local corner, 
but few people show interest in general, overall plans. People are 
aroused only when the plan begins to be effectuated in ways which 
are adverse to some interests. This is one of the major problems in 
planning. We should like to develop the same citizen interest in long- 
range plans that is evidenced on matters of rezoning. Creating public 
interest in the general planning process takes strenuous efforts on the 
part of the planning department and is done largely by working 
through organizations such as Parent-Teachers, Leagues of Women 
Voters and library boards. Planning departments try to present the 
plan as it is developed and as it is put together. There is not always 
opposition at each stage, and if there is no opposition, there is little 
interest and less attendance at meetings. There is general apathy, and 
many people expect and want their governmental representatives and 
experts to provide services and plans without, in general, involving 
citizen participation. However, many of us in government wonder if 
we are really gaining citizen understanding. 



324 NEWS NOTES OF CALIPORNL'^ LIBRARIES 

"MECHANICS OF PLANNING'^ 

Outline of Text Given ly Frank S. Skillman 
Planning Officer, San Mateo County 

"I was somewhat shocked to find that I had been assigned a discus- 
sion topic — The Mechanics of Immediately visions of 'Popu- 
lar Mechanics' magazine and all sorts of rather distasteful mechanical 
monstrosities from my son's greasy hot-rod to Rube Goldberg contrap- 
tions flashed through my mind and insulted my sensitive art, architec- 
ture and design-oriented world of planning. 

"In desperation I called upon Webster to help me read into my sub- 
ject title something which you very sensitive librarians must have had 
in mind. Here 's what I found : 

^Mechanics: Branch of physics dealing with the action of forces on bodies and 
with motion.' (Little help there.) Mechanics include kinetics, statics and kine- 
matics. . . . 'Mechanics — knowledge dealing with machinery.' . . . This may be 
it : 'Mechanics — Technique.' Technique of planning. This suggests the Jiow of 
or methodology of planning.' 

' ' Planning is a process each of us uses constantly in his daily life, or 
should use, in his personal, business and family life. So we are dis- 
cussing a very familiar process. But community planning is what pro- 
fessional planners do, we tell ourselves, and suggest that community 
planning is too complicated for ordinary persons ; that it must be done 
by specially trained people and that a professionally prepared master 
or comprehensive plan will insure a glorious future for the community 
— if they only follow the plan. 

"All planning involves two kinds of decision. First, goals — ^we must 
know what we want. (Simple for the individual, more complicated for 
the family, and very difficult to determine for the community.) 

"Second, means — ^we must decide how we are to attain them. (Again, 
simpler for the individual than for the community.) 

"Planned decisions in these matters are deliberate and are based on 
careful study and analysis. We include precise definition of ends, col- 
lection of relevant information and analysis of alternative ways of 
achieving ends. We also attempt to forecast the consequences of fol- 
lowing each possible course of action. Then we can choose the way that 
we feel will best accomplish what we want within our available re- 
sources and with the fewest objectionable side effects. 

"You have just been given the short-s/ior# course in planning — sort 
of the instant brand. Now, in the time remaining let us run through 
the mechanics — the step-by-step process of community master planning. 

"First in the plan preparation of any community is to know every- 
thing about that community that you can possibly find by research, 
gather together and otherwise dig up." 

Basic studies would include the following : 

Historical Background — The glory and the gore. 

Base Maps — Such a vital tool to the planners that he feels naked without. 
Physical Features — Is she a "perfect 36"? They never are. 
Population — Not so simple to keep up with here in California. 
Economic Base — What keeps the town alive and why? Are there more bedrooms 
than jobs? 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 325 

Land Use— What's been the housekeeping of the past and present? How much 

dirt's been swept under the community carpet? 
Legal Baclfground — Law and order or graft and corruption? 
Transportation — Rapid or rabid? Signs of hardening of the arteries? What's the 

horsepower — old dobbin or supersonic fly ways? 
Public Facilities — Capital budgeted or pressure swayed? Do the kids meet at 

the library or at the pool hail? City Hall or Tammany Hall? Schools for 

kids or against? Sardine? ABC or progressive? 
Regional Relationship — An island unto itself or an integral cell of a metro- 
politan complex? 
Existing Official Maps and Plans — -What's been done in the past? How dusty 

are they? 
Aesthetic Considerations — What's worth saving? What natural assets should be 

emphasized? 

' ' These studies should give you the length, breadth and depth of your 
community — a true reflection of really what it is. The next step in our 
planning process is that of analysis and projection. We're getting into 
the crystal ball and ivory tower phase of planning. This is the activity 
in which planners are so notorious, and where professional skill and 
know-how are called upon. Even a child can recognize a certain fruit 
as an apple but that apple can go into a pie that could be unacceptably 
sour, or out of this world in goodness, depending upon the skill and 
know-how of the cook. 

"Because our planning is for people, and I optimistically hope that 
the human side of our planning is always foremost, we start with the 
projection of the numbers of people we can reasonably expect in our 
community in the future — in 10 years, or in 20-30 years; and just 
where they will be living and in what numbers. 

"An integral part of this analysis and projection process of popula- 
tion is consideration of places of work, kinds of work, expected number 
of jobs of all kinds. Does your community place emphasis upon white 
collar or blue collar economic growth? What is the reasonable expecta- 
tion for a balanced development tax- wise? Do you wish to continue to 
be dubbed a bedroom community? 

' ' We are now armed with all pieces of information in our community 
jigsaw puzzle and now begin to discern certain patterns for future 
land use requirements. 

"We now move into the final stage in the preparation of A Prelim- 
inary General Plan and Report, which includes the following statements 
and elements: 

First : A statement of assumptions — an intelligent guess, if you will, upon and 
within which all else is based. 
A statement of objectives that reflects the community goals. 
A statement of principles and standards. 

"The General Plan Map — The land use element indicates areas of 
living, work and play. This plan sets forth just how many residents 
can be expected in each neighborhood of the community. With this 
established, it is comparatively elementary to translate the needs of 
each neighborhood into required number of major travel lanes, number 
and location of schools, parks, libraries, firehouses, etc. 

"This general plan is just that — general — a broad-brush picture 
where every little bit of information has been fitted into a composite 
projection of your community of tomorrow. If your job of factfinding 



326 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

and analysis is tliorough and has been properly set within the frame 
of community goals, principles and standards, your master plan should 
be a comprehensive plan that embodies the needs of every segment of 
your community. 

''The limiting ability of clearly delineating the numerous facets in- 
volved in a comprehensive plan of any complex area, such as we have 
in the urban and metropolitan areas most of us are familiar with, 
makes it mandatory to supplement the master plan with supporting 
maps, diagrams, charts, descriptive material and reports. 

"I recall how disgusted one of my county supervisors was when I 
handed him the Master Plan of San Mateo County. He said, 'Do you 
mean that after 3^ years of preparation at a cost of over $100,000, this 
is all we get?' This most natural human reaction, in this age of paper, 
has led some of my colleagues to give them a few more pounds for their 
dollar. But more and more master plans are coming out in this simple, 
direct, readable-in-a-sitting form. 

"Whereas our legal tender, paper money, comes out in small, light 
slips of paper, we know that back in Fort Knox there's some pretty 
heavy cold cash backing up that bit of paper ; so behind these simplified 
published master plans are volumes of supporting and descriptive ma- 
terial gathering dust in the planning office. 

"The very definition of planning is to scheme, to contrive; which 
leads to the assumption that planners are schemers and contrivers. 
This I will not deny, for I am fully aware that some planners will 
contrive to publish reports in shape and size as to defy you librarians 
to conveniently fde away, out of sight. 

' ' Too often, the publishing of the comprehensive plan seems to shower 
a cloud of sand in our mechanics of planning, and brings this planning 
process to a screeching halt. At this point the professional planner often 
wakes up to the fact that he has been up in his 'ivory tower' or on 
'Cloud 9,' and that his plan is just that — his. The selling process is 
indeed a hard sell if the community leaders don't feel that they have 
had a part of this planning process. In the past years there have been 
more master plans deserted than were adopted by public officials. 

"Nevertheless, things are looking up and more and more planning 
commissions, city councils and boards of supervisors now recognize 
that it's money down the rat hole to have a general plan prepared and 
then not implemented by adoption. 

' ' Following the adoption of the plan comes the preparation or review 
of zoning and subdivision ordinances to implement the general plan. 
"Official plan lines for future needed streets and roads, or the widen- 
ing of existing thoroughfares, are an indispensible step in the long 
journey of rebuilding the community to its future needs and desires. 
"Capital improvement programing is an indispensable tool of the 
planner to move effectuation of the plan and to keep it moving within 
the financial ability of the community to accomplish. New libraries as 
proposed by the librarian v/ould in this process meet on equal terms 
with other capital improvement projects. 

"Land acquisition budgeting, we have found, makes it possible to 
acquire needed community sites at a time when it is financially favor- 
able to the community, as well as making it possible to move before 
private development has swallowed up all the available sites. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 327 

"It would appear that a master plan program as outlined, if adopted 
by a community and effectuated, would just about solve the planning 
problems. I'm sorry to report that this is not the case. Allow me, in 
my closing remarks, to set forth what really goes on in the planning 
process : 

"At best, immediately upon the adoption of the master plan of what- 
ever excellence, erosion is set in motion. The public whittle and chip 
away to shape or contort this master plan to adjust to their special 
interest. Sometimes this can be done in concert with the community's 
general interest, but more often than not this is not the case. The 
hammer and chisel used in these instances are most often for change 
of land use through the zoning ordinance. The drip, drip type of ero- 
sion can best be characterized by the variance — that most innocent 
drop in itself but so inundating to our plan in total volume. 

"New subdivisions can be one of the best ways in implementing our 
plan. Here, through co-operation of the land developer and the com- 
munity, major thoroughfares of our plan can come into reality years 
sooner than otherwise. Also, this co-operation can sometimes be extended 
to include sites for libraries and other needed public improvements of 
not so much of interest here. 

"The master plan is not a static document, but to keep it alive and 
a truly effective force as a guide to your community of the future, 
requires constant review by the professional planners, planning com- 
missioners and legislative bodies. This is not an easy task, what with 
all those chiselers and drips ever present, but the adoption of a master 
plan without mandatory review by the planners and legislative bodies 
is a drastic mistake and I would be so bold as to make this an indis- 
pensable gear in the mechanics of planning." 



In reply to audience questions, Mr. Skillman amplified two points. 
Asked at what stage in the county planning process the library should 
develop physical plans, and when those plans should be incorporated 
into the general plan, Mr. Skillman stated that the library belongs in 
district plans. The county as a unit is too big, and the county master 
plan too general, for specifications. San Mateo County is divided into 
seven districts for detailed planning purposes. 

On the question of whether it might not be more practical to begin 
planning with objectives, and with significant facts rather than "all 
the facts" — often an overwhelming quantity — the speaker emphasized 
that the best comprehensive planning can be done only on the basis 
of comprehensive facts. He remarked that quick, emergency planning 
— ' ' windshield planning ' ' from what can be immediately seen — is some- 
times necessary but never ideal. It is difficult to remodel an old com- 
munity without a complete knowledge of all community aspects . . . 
"the length, breadth and depth of the community." 



328 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



PANEL: PLANNED REALITY IN PALO ALTO 

Moderator: Mr. Kenneth L. Wilson, Librarian, Palo Alto Public 
Library 

Participants: 

Mr. Lewis J. Fourcroy, City Planner, Palo Alto 

Mr. K. Wilson 

Mr. Alfred Mitchell, City Controller, Palo Alto 

Mr. Tully Knoles, Member, Friends of the Library, Palo Alto 

Mr. Fourcroy: A general plan basically represents a series of inte- 
grated policies for the city to utilize and follow. For the most part, 
these policies direct the development of the physical environment, not 
the social aspects. 

Although there is a great body of professional literature in the field 
of planning — almost more than planners can keep up with — ^there has 
been insufficient popular writing on the subject to educate the general 
public to the general plan concept. 

A major function of the series of established policies making up the 
general plan is to provide a basic framework within which the respon- 
sible legislative bodies can make broad decisions or judge specific build- 
ing proposals. A general plan tries to effect a balance between financing 
potential and what is desired or needed. The plan also gives municipal 
agency staffs and private developers the basic direction of the com- 
munity, and new residents a guide to the future. 

Population prediction is difficult in California; so much so that gen- 
eral plans should probably be conceived for 15 rather than the cus- 
tomary 20 years life span. Chances are only 50-50 that original esti- 
mates will work out as predicted by the end of the first five years. 

Plans should be general. Facilities should be located within areas, 
but not definitely sited. The comprehensive plan must take in three 
factors : land use — living, working and industrial — circulation or tran- 
sit, and facilities. 

Librarians can help planners by providing materials and information 
on what residents want, and will want, in terms of library service. If 
the city planner does not seek out the librarian, then the librarian 
should put down his thoughts about the most desirable plan of library 
service and seek out the planner. The friends of the library should 
follow the whole process of developing a general plan for the physical 
development of the city, and should be familiar with every proposal 
embodied in the plan. The organization will then be in a good position 
to support the co-operative efforts of the planner and the librarian. 

The most effective time for co-operation is early in the process. The 
view should be presented before the Planning Commission has set up 
the plan, and before the public hearing stage. The Planning Commis- 
sion needs citizen support, comment and criticism. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 329 

Mr. Wilson: The public library must have principles and objectives, 
however worded. The semantics change over the years. At one time 
we spoke of provision of educational tools; in the public library in- 
quiry, the objectives are stated as "to assemble, preserve, and admin- 
ister books and related educational materials in organized collections, 
in order to promote, through guidance and stimulation, an enlightened 
citizenship and enriched personal lives. ' ' ^ 

It is up to us to plan what we want and how we can achieve it. We 
have a manual in the Palo Alto Public Library which includes a section 
on the background of our community, and on our goals. Mrs. Schenk's 
book is a valuable guide to use when you attempt to set down a picture 
of where you are and where you want to go.^ 

"We are fortunate in Palo Alto that we have had citizen groups inter- 
ested in objectives and in the practical application of library goals in 
our community situation. Citizen groups have thrashed out the ques- 
tions of : do we want a big main library, or mostly branches, or what ? 
"We have developed branch standards : for 10,000 people, a minimum 
annual circulation of from 75,000 to 150,000, a 25,000 book stock, 4-5 
employees, and 40 parking spaces. 

The Palo Alto population curve is changing as the proportions of 
each age group alter. The community has doubled its population in the 
last 10 years and has also developed its basic character further. "We 
have to know these facts, and work on the basis of them. Our citizens' 
committees have studied the library on such a solid basis, and have 
■done an informed job. 



Mr. Mitchell: The evolution in city financing is toward greater cen- 
tral control; the use of special semi-independent funds such as library 
commission funds, police funds, etc. is on the wane. Palo Alto has 
developed a strong centralized control under a strong city manager, 
with all functions divided into two major categories, direct services 
and administration. Libraries must fit into this new pattern, and com- 
pete with other agencies for moneys. 

Controllers must wrestle with all these budgets. We can raise a lim- 
ited number of dollars, and we have to decide how we are going to 
raise them. We need a general guide, and the city's general plan is 
part of this. The general plan must then be keyed to the economic ability 
of the community. There is no point to planning for a service — such as 
a large park — if it cannot be supported. Economic analysis is a neces- 
sary adjunct to the most current general plan; the two together show 
where the money comes from and where it is, spent. 

We also need a plan of municipal services. By this we set the levels 
and limits of what each functional agency will provide the community : 
how many books we will buy ; how many police we will have on patrol, 
and where, and at what times. 

^ Robert D. Leigh, The Public Library in the United States, The General Report of 
the Public Library Inquiry (New Yorlc : Columbia University Press, 1950) p. 16. 

^Gretchen Knief Schenk, County and Regional Library Development (Chicago: 
American Library Association, 1954) 263 p. 



330 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

Cities are worrying more and more nowadays about future budgets. 
"We have to look ahead and develop a capital improvement plan for 
construction, which cannot usually be financed in one year. The capital 
improvement plan is derived from the plan for municipal services, is 
designed for five years and is annually reviewed and updated. 

Finally, we have to have an annual operating budget, based on and 
integrated with all the other plans. The budget provides for ongoing 
municipal services, and includes one year's share of capital costs. 

All cities have fiscal policies. "We have written ours down in eight 
points in Palo Alto : 

1. Current operating expenditures are paid for out of current 
revenue. 

2. Operating equipment is paid for out of current revenue, but funds 
can be accumulated for replacement. 

3. Special services provided to special groups are financed through 
cost-based charges or fees to those groups. This category includes 
such services as city golf courses. 

4. Taxes on property are approximately equal to safety services ex- 
penditures. Our other revenue comes from utility charges and 
from sales tax. 

5. Sales tax collected in excess of needs is placed in capital improve- 
ments funds. 

6. Capital improvements which benefit special areas are paid from 
special assessments on area residents. 

7. Other capital improvements are financed from the capital im- 
provement funds and through bond issues. In making decisions in 
this area, we have to determine and balance present and proposed 
debt structure, the life of the capital project, alternate uses pro- 
posed for the funds, and the electorate's view of our indebtedness. 

8. The city seeks federal and state aid for capital improvements when 
such aid is available for the purpose desired, and when the terms 
of the aid do not compromise the city. 

Mr. Knoles: Palo Alto is conservative and progressive in the best 
sense of each word. The Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce (Mr. Knoles 
is a past president) is not and never has been an "industry at any cost" 
association. Its full name is the Chamber of Commerce and Civic Asso- 
ciation, and members stress the latter function. The Chamber worked 
with the University and with local groups to seek out the best types of 
light industry and research and development organizations to locate on 
the University lands which have become the Stanford Industrial Park. 
This development has led to a big increase in the tax base, and that, 
together with municipally owned public utilities, has led to a low tax 
rate and good services. 

Library history begins in 1904, when a $10,000 Carnegie building was 
put up. This structure is now the downtown branch. In the 1930 's one 
branch library was built through the WPA. In 1940 a private con- 
tributor gave funds for a children's library in the Community Center, 
so up to "World "War II there were three library outlets in Palo Alto. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 331 

The post war population went in one direction, southwards. The geog- 
raphy of expansion presented a library planning problem. 

The new industrial pattern brought talented, interested citizens into 
the community, and they have fostered library development. The im- 
portance of citizen participation cannot be too strongly emphasized. 
The library needs active, serious, studied support. 

The League of Women V^oters studied the library in 1952-53. They 
requested further study from the City Council, and in 1955 a Citizens' 
Library Action Committee was established, approved by all interested 
groups. Eight subcommittees were formed, and in 1955-56 these groups 
worked in the following ways. One subcommittee made a current survey 
of current needs, with assistance from the California State Library and 
the University of California at Berkeley. An "Interim" committee 
studied facilities and services for all residents. A Community Educa- 
tion subcommittee worked through a speakers' bureau to inform the 
public of library needs. One group worked on liaison with the City 
Council, City Manager and Capital Improvements Committee. A youth 
sub-committee was made up of high school and junior high school stu- 
dents, pupils from private schools, and faculty members. Their special 
task was to study gaps in library service to residents of outlying areas. 
A Visual Aids committee produced posters, maps and slides, and a 
Public Relations committee reported to organizations and civic groups. 
The Financing Sub-committee considered ways and means to finance 
more library outlets. 

There were representatives from all walks of life on each sub-com- 
mittee. The results of the Citizens' Library Action Committee were 
excellent. The community was convinced of the need to upgrade the 
library, and the necessary steps were taken. A bond issue, which in- 
cluded other facilities besides libraries, was approved in 1957. Two 
new library buildings were constructed in 1958. This has given Palo 
Alto's 55,000 population, five good libraries well sited. 

The study and action process not only accomplished the original pur- 
pose, but also sparked formation of a Friends of the Library group. 
It had the long term effect of making the community realize that a 
library is an absolute must, and also that libraries need citizen support. 
The overwhelming majority of community residents are not only happy 
with their library system, but they also feel that they have had a part 
in its development. 

In 1950 the library ranked ninth in a public opinion poll on desirable 
tax supported services. Today, we are sure, the library would place in 
the very top ranks if such a poll were to be taken. 



332 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 



PANEL: PLANNING FROM MANY ANGLES 

Moderator: Miss Arlene Hope, Principal Librarian, Consultant 
Services, California State Library 

Participants: 

Mr. Coit Coolidge, Librarian, Richmond Public Library 
Mr. Harry Halatyn, City and Regional Planner, Sacramento 
Miss M. Josephine Moore, Librarian, Plumas County Library 
Mrs. Alice F. Reilly, Librarian, Fresno County Library 
Mr. Reino Liukkonen, County Planner, Fresno County 

Miss Hope: The speakers on "Planning From Many Angles" inclnde 
a representative from one of the large metropolitan libraries of the 
State, and the librarian from one of the most strictly rural counties. 
We have a range of planning situations. 



HOW DO WE MEASURE UP?— A QUICK LOOK AT THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY NEEDS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 
AND A FORECAST FOR THE FUTURE 

Coit Coolidge 

Librarian, Richmond Public Library 

"Since public library service is directed toward people, population 
is basic. As librarians we deal with recorded thought. In these days 
that may come out in many forms. While books and printed materials 
are still fundamental elements in the equation and serve the largest 
number of people, more and more sophisticated kinds of nonbook mate- 
rial are coming into the recorded thought picture. In a general way 
these embrace the whole field of audiovisual materials and methods, 
and the whole field of radio and television as it applies to public edu- 
cation. To complete the picture, we should give thought to such things 
as electronic memory devices, knowledge retrieval, and documentation. 

"Public libraries are traditionally supported by local and state gov- 
ernment. So government is another factor in the equation. In metro- 
politan areas the factor of government is very complex, and this 
complexity often blocks action in areas where action is sensible and nec- 
essary — like planning for adequate libraries. Now I will talk a little bit 
about planning for libraries in the nine counties touching San Fran- 
cisco Bay. Let 's begin with the population picture. 

"In 1960 the nine counties had (according to the census) about 3.6 
million people. Of these, approximately 684,000 were between the ages 
of 5 and 14, the age group which uses our children's rooms, and 463,000 
more were between the ages of 15 and 24, the ages which drown out our 
reading rooms. We expect 6.8 million people of all ages hj 1990. There 
is no reason to expect these 3.2 million additional people will arrive 
in an even flow; it is much more likely that the population will in- 
crease sporadically. However, for the sake of discussion, if an even 
flow did occur, it would average more than a million new people for 



VOLUME '^'J^ NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 333 

each decade of the next 30 years. If you assume there would be a simi- 
lar proportion in each age group, 30 years hence, you would then need 
to be in a position to give library service to 1,291,000 children in the 
5 to 14 age group and about 872,000 in the age 15 to 24 bracket. The 
following table shows how these figures grow: 

Table I iqqq j^ggo 

Children (5-14) 684,000 1,291,000 

Young people (15-24) 463,000 872,000 

''This adds up roughly to twice as much of everything. We are not 
doing a very adequate job now. So what this really means is that to be 
as far behind 30 years from now as we are today would take twice as 
much of everything we now use : books, staff, buildings, etc. This analy- 
sis leaves two-thirds of the population unaccounted for. If we could 
modernize our approach and could improve the quality of our service 
to the point where we could break through the indifference barrier and 
really reach this other two-thirds, then we would need at least four 
times as much as we now have instead of twice as much. 

"Our main support is through local government. Local government 
— municipal, county, and district — is our greatest financial asset, and 
yet at the same time it is here that we run into one of our greatest 
single problems. To promote our basic needs we have to work with a 
multiplicity of unco-ordinated governmental units. In 1947 a study 
by John C. Bollens for the University of California Bureau of Public 
Administration indicated there were then 699 independent governmen- 
tal units in the San Francisco Bay area.^ This was 15 years ago. A 
well-informed individual in this field has guessed there may be at least 
850 today. While many of these have no relation to libraries, they all 
compete for a share of the tax dollar. I have not had the opportunity 
to compute the number of library administrations in the nine counties, 
but it is quite large. The number of independent overhead governments 
which will have to be influenced to get the important facilities we 
need to keep up with the times is a complicating factor in the equation. 
The complexity of so many governments in an expanding situation thus 
becomes a major problem. 

What We Have Compared to Standards for What We Need 

"Statistical studies recently prepared by Dr. Edward A. Wight for 
the PLECC group of public librarians show that in 1960 we had al- 
most 1.4 volumes per capita (1.398) and that 30 years ago we had 1.3 
per capita. This includes books of all kinds. It indicates we are just 
holding our own but not making much progress. CLA standards for 
juvenile libraries indicate that for library systems serving 100,000 or 
more people, two volumes per capita is standard, and that some libraries 
feel that 2.6 per capita (juvenile population) is good practice. We have 
3.4 (full-time equivalent staff) per 10,000 population, against the ALA 
standard of 4. In operating expenditures we are spending almost $2.40 
per capita. While ALA de-emphasizes per capita concepts because so 

iJohn C. Bollens, The Proilem of Government in the San Francisco Bay Region. 
(Berkeley: University of California Bureau of Public Administration, 1948) 
p. 29, Table 6. 



334 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES 

many people have misunderstood and misused such figures, they did 
in 1957 cautiously suggest that $2.60 was a rough minimum for a sys- 
tem and that $3.50 per capita (in 1956 dollars) was recommended. We 
are below the minimum, and this in one of the richest areas of the 
United States. Our book circulation per capita for the nine counties 
was 5.4 in 1960. "We did more than this in 1930 and 1940. In all these 
gloomy figures there are two encouraging ones : 1960 book circulation 
per capita is higher than 1950, and on a constant purchasing power 
basis our operating funds have increased four-fold since 1920. 

' ' To get our finances up to the figure suggested by ALA would mean 
a very substantial increase. Our average operating expenditures for the 
decennial period ending in 1960 were $8.7 million. To bring this up 
to $3.50 per capita would mean adding 40 to 50 percent and would 
bring the total to $12.2 to $13 million. We need now, to take care of 
the people we presently serve, at least 4 million more dollars than we 
have and we could easily use 5 million. 

What Kind of a Strucfure of Library Services Do We Wish to Build in this 
Area to Meet Metropolitan Needs in an Urban Manner? 

"1 am not prepared to paint this picture in detail at this point, but 
can name a few items. 

"First, we need the strongest possible service at each existing library 
unit. To assist these units, a number of services are needed which are 
regional in nature ; services which cannot be done readily by one unit. 
Some other services are needed on a regional basis simply because they 
can be done more economically and efficiently that way. So, what are 
our needs ? 

"(1) We need at least one and possibly three or four central storage 
warehouses for older materials. Inactive materials could be dis- 
carded into these and, with a delivery service, be produced on 
demand within 24 hours. This would do a lot to keep our active 
collections active. 

"(2) We need more groups of libraries working together on central- 
ized processing. I do not worship size. I am sure there is a point 
of diminishing returns where size becomes a handicap. But the 
most inefficient way of all is for a library that is too small to do 
its own. Many of our Bay area units could benefit by central 
processing and repair work. 

" (3) We need to tie up more closely to radio and television. A great 
deal of high-grade educational material at all levels is broadcast 
every day. IMuch of this is public education in its truest sense. 
We need a practical method for co-ordination of library services 
with these broadcasting services. We need to know how to tie up 
the broadcasting services to the public libraries. This function 
is regional in nature. The boundaries are the perimeter of the 
broadcasting beam. This is much larger for radio than for televi- 
sion. Even the television circle embraces an enormous population. 
In no case do the broadcasting boundaries coincide with local 
political boundaries — city limits or county lines. 



k 



VOLUME ^y, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 335 

" (4) We need co-ordinated public relations services for the Bay area. 

This function would be regional in nature. 
" (5) We need staff for the promotion and development of libraries to 
help us keep pace with the growth in the midst of this magnifi- 
cent complexity. 
"(6) We need staff to give a high level of counseling and technical 
advice in the following fields : 

Radio and television; audiovisual materials; children's 
work ; cataloging ; young adult ; senior citizens and work with 
the aging; book selection; adult services; and recruiting (and 
with this the following up of careers; advancing those who 
show promise of leadership). 
" (7) We need connection of main points by teletype. 

Reasonable Goals 

"We are below standard now. A quick look at the crystal ball indi- 
cates that we should get up to the minimum standard as fast as we can 
and at the same time start growing. We should be prepared to grow 
quantitatively and qualitatively. At the quantitative level we need 
regional facilities as indicated above. We need book stocks substan- 
tially greater than we now have. We need more buildings, more operat- 
ing money, and more staff. At the qualitative level, we need to improve 
our personnel methods. We need to develop stronger people at high 
levels and through regional organization to share our most effective 
people. At the qualitative level I can see by 1990 a system of library 
service that really reaches all the people, that is closely aligned with 
educational broadcasting, that functions for all without regard to resi- 
dence. I can see a 50 percent increase in per capita support and a 
75 percent increase in per capita use. I can see three strong central 
reference services — one at San Francisco, one at Oakland, and one at 
San Jose. I can see second level reference services developing at centers 
such as Pleasant Hill, Palo Alto, Richmond, Sunnyvale, and San Lean- 
dro. I can see full utilization of all forms of recorded thought. Planners 
will be interested in buildings and in budgets. Librarans will be inter- 
ested in a great deal of data that can be supplied by planners. They 
need to work together." 



Mr. Halatyn: Plumas County is excellently described in a state study 
as being all trees and few people.^ Mr. Halatyn undertook a planning 
study of the county in 1959. He described his association with the rural 
region and its people as a refreshing contrast to experience with the 
more familiar urban scene. Planning studies of rural areas must empha- 
size the values of rural living. It is important that we maintain our 
national forests, and that Plumas County keep its trees. 

Plumas County is a region in itself. We cannot apply the same stand- 
ards for its development that would be applicable in industrialized, or 
agricultural, counties. We must take standards as a starting point and 

2 study of the Northeast Counties, State Department of Water Resources Bulletin 
58 (Sacramento: July 1957) Appendix A. 



336 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

then re-evaluate them in light of the area with which we are concerned. 
Plumas is large and separated into sections by mountain ridges. The 
lumber industry is declining now, but future water resources develop- 
ments will open the county up beyond past and present experience. 
In its present stage of development, the county population peak is in 
the summer vacation months. Vacationers from the whole State are 
using county facilities and roads. Cities must come to realize that they 
are creating problems for rural areas in this way. 

We are on the threshhold of a new technology. There is every pros- 
pect, and not a happy one, that the mountain counties will grow enorm- 
ously in the future. Nuclear power in small packages will change the 
rural way of life as well as the urban. "We have to think science-fiction 
thoughts. Our shopping habits will change. Mass communication will 
affect libraries and the educational process. There will be a higher pro- 
portion of older people in the population, and a far greater population 
total. Problems of overpopulation of regions are real, and will have 
to be faced. The Bay area has already reached the proportions of many 
eastern metropolitan complexes. 

In the light of this, we must attempt to retain our natural areas and 
do our planning accordingly. Economic feasibility is not hard-and-fast 
arithmetic, but is based on what people wa7it to pay for good living. 
In planning, we must be flexible, and keep working toward the goals 
to which we too often give merely lipservice. 



Miss Moore: "The nature of Plumas County and the intent of the 
planning process for the county as described by Mr. Halatyn, are the 
very same factors which make planning for library service there diffi- 
cult. The intent of the plans, as expressed fully in the General Plan 
for Plumas County, is to preserve the nature of the physical resources 
of the county, and to keep it an area possessing great timber, water 
and mineral resources, thus providing opportunities for employment 
and industrial and recreational development. The county is also to be 
maintained as a great outdoor recreation area with unique scenic 
beauty, abundant fish and game, excellent climate and year-round ac- 
cessibility providing diversified recreation not only for local residents 
but for the State and nation as well; and, as a desirable place to live 
and work, with a healthful smog-free climate, good employment con- 
ditions, adequate schools and roads, with no problems of overcrowding 
and with excellent opportunities for constructive leisure time living.^ 

"The Plumas County Free Library was organized in 1915 and con- 
tracted to serve Sierra County in 1926. The annual payment for service 
is currently $2,500, and will be revised again shortly to $3,000. Both 
counties have about the same problems of great physical distances and 
low population densities. 

' ' The County Library operates 17 outlets of varying sizes in the two 
counties. In Plumas County three main libraries outside of the head- 
quarters at Quincy contain 4,000-5,000 volumes and range in annual 
circulation from 10,000 to 20,000. The Quincy headquarters contains 

^General Plan for Future Development, Plumas County, California (Sacramento: 
Pacific Planning and Research. 1959). 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 337 

about 4,000 volumes and has direct access to the County Library stack 
area of 20,000 books. Annual circulation from the Quincy branch is 
45,000. The two large outlets in Sierra County contain 500 to 1,000 
volumes and circulate 2,500 to 5,000 volumes annually. Many library 
systems represented at this workshop would not operate such small 
branches, of course ; yet in Plumas County we have even smaller outlets 
than these, located in homes, stores and post offices throughout the two 
counties. The book collections in these number 100 volumes, and the 
stock is changed quarterly. 

' ' The total budget for the County Free Library, including funds for 
Sierra, was $42,000 for fiscal year 1961-62. Of this $28,000 goes for 
salaries, $7,000 for books and other materials, and $7,000 for operating 
expenses. A substantial part of the latter is for travel and mileage 
because distances are great; and another large share is for postage, as 
most shipments are made by mail. 

"This is not a large budget; yet Plumas County is a relatively 
wealthy area among the mountain-plateau counties. The Plumas County 
tax rate this year was the lowest in the State, 1.2818 mills for general 
county tax. The county valuation is $75 million. 

''The county is representative of areas with natural resources, and 
few people, and the planning problems typical. 

"Population distribution is the feature which affects library plan- 
ning most seriously. The 11,600 Plumas residents are spread over 2,570 
square miles and 2,100 Sierra County residents occupy 958 square 
miles. Of course, if we served the 14,000 people in one spot with the 
current budget and staff, we could give excellent library service. Even 
in the year 2050 the population predicted is 44,000, still not up to 
standards for library system service. 

"In Plumas County the population density is 4.1 persons per square 
mile and in Sierra County the density is 2.3 persons per square mile. 
This is an average of course; our people are not spread over the area 
but are collected in little settlements. The distance between settlements 
is another factor affecting service. The three main branches in Plumas 
County are each 25-50 miles from headquarters. "We have branches on 
the edges of the county located 52, 90 and 40 miles away. These dis- 
tances are the more difficult because roads follow the various forks 
and branches of the Feather and Yuba Rivers. 

"Some areas are growing rapidly, where recreation projects are 
under way or completed. Two areas are growing especially and both 
are planned for further development. Neither has library service within 
ten miles. It is not feasible to start branches to serve these communities 
because neither could support a branch. 

"Emphasis on recreation in both counties has a side effect on library 
service. The General Plan shows that seasonal population increases are 
as much as 115% from late April to October, the fishing and hunting 
seasons. When the various Feather River project dams and recreational 
areas near them are finished, the seasonal population may increase 
still more. Many visitors to the county are not transient ; they own or 
lease summer homes. We also have summer resort workers, campers, 
resort residents and transient tourists. Many of these want library 
service. Our solution up to now has been a temporary card for those 



338 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

who will be in the county a short period. We ask for a permanent ad- 
dress and a local reference. Property owners are given regular cards 
and transient tourists are asked to put down a deposit. Later, we may 
have to institute a nonresident fee or arrange reciprocal borrowing 
privileges for patrons who are registered in other county or municipal 
libraries of the State. 

''American Library Association standards suggest that community 
libraries or bookmobile stops should be provided at intervals so that 
every school age child can reach the library alone. We cannot meet 
this standard in an area such as Plumas. The obvious and major reason 
is distance. The most efficient and logical near-solution is bookmobile 
service. This was made the first step of the library plan. A bookm*obile 
could serve the presently unserved areas, provide service as needed to 
areas in which population fluctuates with the seasons and to the com- 
munities now served by deposits in homes and post offices. 

"A proposal for bookmobile service was presented to the County 
Board of Supervisors recently. The supervisors were not convinced of 
the need and took no action to provide funds. The bookmobile is still 
a major element of the library plan for development, as it is the only 
solution to problems of small scattered rural settlements. The base 
standard for bookmobile service was one carrier for each 5,000 people. 

"The second phase of the library plan was the closing of small com- 
munity outlets. This was to follow on the first phase, and could not 
be put into practice without the bookmobile ; some residents would have 
been left as much as 40 miles from the nearest library. The outlets were 
left open, and we have tried to find ways to speed up the process of 
rotating book collections and providing current material. The solu- 
tion — which we hope will be effective — ^was purchase of a large collec- 
tion of paperback materials. These can be simply processed and easily 
distributed to the smallest branches. The paperback project is definitely 
a substitute for what Ave believe would be the best plan for service, but 
may be adequate until such time as we can add a bookmobile. 

' ' The third phase of library development is to improve the resources 
of the three main branches outside of headquarters. The populations 
served range from 2,000 to 3,000. We would like to develop them into 
regional centers, with basic reference collections in each, backed up by 
the resources of the county library headquarters. The ultimate goal, 
of course, would be a professional librarian in each, but this is finan- 
cially impossible now. As one part of the plan to improve these 
branches, the county librarian will spend one day in each branch every 
two weeks on a regular schedule, to provide professional library assist- 
ance to patrons, to study the book collection with the intent of building 
it to fit the community, and to give inservice training to the local 
branch librarian. The schedule of visits will be announced so that 
patrons who wish to avail themselves of professional readers' advisory 
and reference services can. 

''Another phase of the development plan is an adequate headquar- 
ters building and branch library in Quincy. The present building, a 
wing of the courthouse, provides a total of 1,400 square feet for all 
operations. A new headquarters building with provision for bookmobile 
operation would require approximately 8,000 square feet. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 339 

"All these plans require money. The lowest cost estimate for the 
bookmobile service would be $20,000 to begin, and $11,000 to maintain 
annually. This is a large portion of the annual budget. Paperbacks are 
not expensive and this takes a small sum from the book and supply 
budget. The upgrading of reference collections in the main branches 
would require considerable funds for books. The provision of profes- 
sional library assistance in each of the branches on a regular schedule 
will require travel funds. 

"Therefore, the final phase of the plan is to increase the annual 
budget in order to put the other phases into operation. 

"Plans are revised as the budget is revised, or as population changes 
or other situations in the couuty alter. For example, the very small 
outlet at La Porte was not included in the proposal for bookmobile 
service because of poor traveling conditions. In 1865 the residents of 
La Porte were induced to join Plumas County. The inducement was 
the building of 'a fine wagon road' to Quincy. Today it is a full 
eight-hour trip to the La Porte branch and back, although the distance 
is only 31 miles each way. Today, the only road to La Porte is still 
that 'fine wagon road.' But the future may make planning library 
services for La Porte a very different matter, because the General Plan 
proposes a major artery to carry 17,000 vehicles a day. We must keep 
revising our plans as the situation changes." 



Mrs. Reilly: Fresno County is a combination of large and small pop- 
ulation areas, and our library plans do not always please all areas. We 
have added bookmobile service recently, and although many county 
residents appreciate this, we have found that some communities still 
prefer to have a small branch building of their own. 

In the beginning of the county library system in Fresno, some of 
the towns began to feel independent as they grew larger, and withdrew, 
or considered withdrawing from the county service. In planning for 
library services for a diversified area, we have to consider the varying 
needs of each section and try to give service that satisfies these needs. 

The Fresno City metropolitan area is such that no one is sure of the 
service area boundaries. People live in one area and borrow books from 
another. We have to do our planning on this basis, and work with total 
area and total population. 

Formerly our book selection policy was standardized for all outlets: 
one copy of each book purchased went to each of five branches. Now 
our policy is to provide the best possible selection according to the 
special character of the community. There are no "standard" branches; 
all are located in specific communities whose residents have interests 
colored by local occupational patterns, local history, and local leisure 
time habits. As an example of our new emphasis in planning, the 
County Library Service Policy Statement reads that: "services pro- 
vided by the public library are planned in relation to other facilities in 
the community served . . . the library must know of, and work with, 
the organized groups and established institutions which the people 



340 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LJBRABIES 

maintain, supplementing and filling gaps in the available intellectual 
resources. Continuous and periodical studies of the community must be 
made by the library in order to adjust to changing needs." 

The county library is conducting a pilot study in the Town of 
Sanger, which has a population of 8,000. About 50,000 people live in 
the surrounding area. The community is now served by a 1916 Car- 
negie building, owned by the town. The county library gives service. 
In 1961 a grand jury, a group appointed by the board of supervisors, 
looked into and reported on library resources in Sanger. The findings 
of that group were very useful to us, and of course there is the added 
advantage that the jury report stirred interest. A grand jury investiga- 
tion is the library's best opportunity to get information to the people 
who need it. One primary recommendation in the findings was re- 
modeling of the old building structure. 

One method used in the pilot study to gain communitywide partici- 
pation was the distribution of Spanish-language questionnaires. We 
had the co-operation of the Spanish-language television station in this. 
The county library hopes to adapt the plan of the Sanger study to 
other localities later. 

As we work for better library service, we must keep selling our prod- 
uct. This means we must tell the library story over and over again. 



Mr. Liuhkonen: Fresno County is 6,000 square miles large, and runs 
from the coastal range to the Sierras. It is primarily agricultural, and 
is the leading county in the nation in value of products sold. The major 
cities are Fresno and Clovis, and each is surrounded by large unin- 
corporated areas. There are 14 other cities, scattered throughout the 
county. Each of them is an agricultural center, with an economy based 
on food processing and sales of agricultural equipment. 

Planning, as a result, has to be split two ways. It is done for the 
county as a whole, and for the metropolitan areas individually. There 
is no master general plan for the county, but we do have a sketch plan 
giving land use and population densities. Planning is a co-operative 
process in the metropolitan areas. Urban specialists work with the 
Fresno City and Clovis City planners. 

The federal government has granted $373,000 for a study in Fresno. 
The County and City of Fresno are splitting the work, and reviewing 
and amending the current plan, and working out detailed, subarea 
plans. Transportation and recreation will be considered, and the li- 
brary is to be included under the public facilities section. A planner 
will be assigned to the city library plan section, and will work co-op- 
eratively with Mrs. Eeilly. We hope to include county library facilities 
in the county plan. 

One of the main aims of the study is an accurate determination of 
population. We have intermediate areas as well as purely rural and 
metropolitan areas. There are no hard and fast demarcations between 
these sections. 

Today Fresno is following the national and state trends in popula- 
tion. Our rural population is declining, and by 1980 the ratio of 
farmers to urban dwellers will be even smaller than it is now. In the 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 341 

five years, 1975-80, we expect to have 14,000 fewer farm people, as the 
urbanized areas grow. The family farms on the east side of the valley 
are disappearing fast. 

It is important for the librarian to know these facts. City and county 
planning staff will provide them to the county library. This data can 
serve as an important guide in the location or relocation of libraries. 



Discussion at the close of the panel presentations brought out the 
following points : 

Metropolitan Service 

The first step in the Bay area plan is to bring service up to an ade- 
quate current service. Projections of future needs are to be made on 
that base, matching library expansion to population expansion. The 
PLBCC committee planning for Bay area service has been in existence 
for a year, and has completed study of the fundamental statistics. Sev- 
eral full-time administrative staff people would be needed to effectuate 
the plan ; the committee is looking into financing possibilities. The area 
will not be eligible for federal funds unless population restrictions 
are removed from the Library Services Act. 

The regional Association of Bay Area Governments was considered 
as a possible sponsor of area library planning. It now has committees 
on transportation, air pollution, and water pollution, only. The mem- 
bers of the board are chosen by mayors and county supervisors ; there 
is one representative for each jurisdiction and eight more at large. 
There is some question about the form this group would take if it were 
to become an official body. There is not acceptance of it as a planning 
district with taxing powers; there are too many districts already. 
A co-operative arrangement under the Joint Exercise of Powers Act 
is possible. 

Librarians must do their own planning in any case, and not wait 
for planning to be done under the aegis of another agency. 

Rural Services 

Many references have been made to the need for different standards 
for rural areas, but we must have some method to work these out. Some 
rural residents may want more service than some urban inhabitants. 
As is true for all services, we must first think of objectives, and then 
work out alternatives for reaching these, after counting up what we 
have and what we want to have. The objectives are the same for rural 
and urban areas; the quantitative standards are different. The prob- 
lem of sparse population has been considered many times in library 
planning. We must not accept the view that good rural library service 
is impossible. Of course, it is easier to give better coverage to urban 
areas; but a democratic society believes in equal opportunity in edu- 
cation and in library service. These should be available to all people, 
everywhere. It will cost more per capita to equalize service, but equalize 
it we must. 



342 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIBS 

THE LIBRARY AND ARCHITECTURE 

William Adamaitis 

Project Planner, Welton Becket and Associates, 

Architects and Engineers, Los Angeles 

"There lias been a great deal said about the library, during the 
workshop sessions thus far, concerning its planning, function, feasibil- 
ity and purpose. In regard to each of these points, many of you have 
arrived at and depend upon specific standards to solve your problems, 
as these standards are applicable to local conditions. Standards unfor- 
tunately have been and are being used as criteria for any number of 
structures regardless of their specific community requirements. This is 
much the same approach as is used by equally qualified professional 
people to other specific building. The possibility of a static, unimagina- 
tive design expression, completely void of warmth and individuality, 
exists when standards are used as more than a point of reference or 
departure in the design of a building. 

"Kecognizing the individual philosophy and character of a library 
and translating these into an architectural statement is a much greater 
task than determining the library's basic function. Normally there is 
little disagreement about the objectives of the library service, but the 
philosophy of the library varies, predicated by whom, where and how 
it serves. 

''The approach to arriving at this individual building philosophy 
might be much the same as you would expect from someone commis- 
sioned to design a new home. As a home should be a reflection of indi- 
vidual personal human desires, wishes, expectations and personality, 
so should the library reflect the community. 

"At this point of departure, you must recognize the fallacy in using 
stereotyped design, which is the application of another's solution. You 
must recognize your responsibility, and, working in close association 
with your community and your architect, endeavor to create a credit- 
able architectural expression suited to the community the library will 
serve. 

' ' The librarian, in approaching the planning program of the library, 
must recognize that the modern library is no longer a warehouse of 
materials available to those who find their way to it by chance, but is 
an aggressive, motivating force of education and inspiration. The ob- 
jective of the library is expressed both in its continuance of traditional 
services and in its adoption of new programs to meet everchanging 
public needs. 

"Technological advancement, the current revolution in communica- 
tion media, the changing role and status of groups, organizations and 
institutions, as well as the needs and capacities of the individuals the 
library serves, all affect the formulation of the philosophy and the very 
foundation of the library building. 

' ' The planning program should incorporate the following basics : 

"1. The library should provide an attractive environment for the 
bringing together of the collections of the library and its poten- 
tial users. 



VOLUME '^'J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 343 

"2. The interior arrangement of the library will, to a large extent, 
determine the efficiency and the effectiveness with which the 
library services may be offered. 

"3. The flexibility of the building, coupled with provision for ex- 
pansion, will help shape the future development of library 
service in the community. 

"4. When handsomely designed, the building will provide an added 
element of motivation to the public. 

' ' Today 's library is a vastly different institution from that of even a 
few years past. It is in a period of transition and is assuming an ever- 
increasing role in the overall educational, informational and cultural 
forces within the community. The library is becoming increasingly ag- 
gressive in its attempt to bring fuller utilization of its vast resources. 
The media with which it works have become much more complex, and 
extend beyond printed forms. Therefore, the building must be flexible 
enough to allow for changes in types of material handled, services 
rendered, number of people served, quantity of material housed, and 
internal staff organization. 

"Since a considerable portion of the library is utilized for the stor- 
age of various collections, attention should be paid to their changing 
physical forms. "While books still constitute the bulk of the library's 
holdings, we should anticipate that an increasing proportion of printed 
pages will be carried and stored in forms other than that of the tradi- 
tional hardbound book; for example, on microfilm or microprint. Each 
type of form demands a particular kind of housing and protection, as 
well as equipment for use. The expanded use of audio-visual aids must 
also be considered in space and storage planning. 

' ' The functional design of the building and the equipment it contains 
must ensure maximum utilization of a minimum library staff, both now 
and in the future. The utilization of modern equipment now used by 
business and industry could cut personnel time currently spent on rou- 
tines and records. The savings could be used to augment the library's 
collections and to increase its services. 

"The public library of today exists in a fast-moving world. These 
rapid changes affect the library's objectives, the media which it han- 
dles, and the scope of its program. For example, it is difficult to predict 
the effect which the eventual development and use of electronics will 
have on the library. Television, information retrieval systems, and the 
possible interlocking of the local library with library systems across the 
country may eventually make the local library a resource beyond what 
we can imagine now. Therefore, today's library building must be flex- 
ible in purpose, and adaptable to tomorrow's program. 

"Regardless of what the future holds in store, the library and its 
services are sure to grow. The basic plans must provide for expanded 
staff and more materials, equipment, collections, and, of course, pa- 
trons. The librarian, with the assistance of the architect, must plan 
methods by which the structure can be expanded economically, without 
imposing useless restrictions on future development or requiring com- 
plex rearrangements of facilities; and yet he must, at the same time, 
keep within the original building and site plans. 



344 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

''Because the population is expanding and educational attainments 
are rising, we must expect increased and more diversified use of the 
library over the next several decades. The number of people who will 
use the collections, request services, and utilize related areas will create 
an unpredictable load on the library's facilities and capacity. So far 
as possible there should be a continued attempt to plan the library as 
a self-service institution. Users should be encouraged to help them- 
selves, and staff members should be in a position to provide maximum 
assistance with a minimum amount of effort. Mutual convenience to 
staff' and public should be a consideration in the location of collections 
and service points within the library. 

"The importance of maintaining a proper acoustical level is empha- 
sized by the fact that people relate quiet with libraries. However, the 
library of today should have a friendly atmosphere, and we should 
accept normal conversational tones rather than whispering as the stand- 
ard for most areas. An environment of absolute silence is far more dis- 
concerting than a reasonable noise level, but some areas of the library 
should definitely provide quiet for readers. Expenditures for carpeting 
and other acoustical materials to control sources of noise can yield 
countless dividends in the form of relaxed readers and staff'. 

"Lighting is another problem in the library. Probably the most fre- 
quent cause of problems is the imbalance created by natural and arti- 
ficial light. Glare makes the use of draperies necessary, but draperies 
in turn cut down the amount of available natural light and in many 
cases the amount of artificial light provided in structures is insufficient 
to make up the diff'erence. The library should be planned to depend as 
much as possible on artificial, controllable lighting, preferably non- 
glare luminous ceilings, at least in all reading areas. 

"There has long been a theory that windows should be arranged to 
reveal the interior of the library, to invite and attract the passerby — a 
sort of self-advertising display. However, it is more important for the 
person inside the library that the windows look out into a restful and 
attractive view such as a garden or quiet patio. 

"Many other considerations warrant attention in the design and 
planning of the library, for the library is a busy institution with com- 
plex functions. These functions are not easy to describe and interpret 
without the combined efforts and co-operation of the librarian and the 
architect. 

"Much of what goes into building design is shrouded in technical 
terminology. There must be conferences between the librarian, library 
commission and library staff on the one hand, and the architect on the 
other, so that each can explain his approach to the other, and answer 
all the questions which arise. There are many avenues of approach to 
the preparation of a workable building program which will result in a 
successful solution. 

"With the certain future growth of libraries comes increased respon- 
sibilities to society. A close association of librarian and architect, and 
an exchange of professional knowledge between them will ensure a 
library building designed to house services which will meet society's 
challenges — present and future. 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 345 



THE PRIVATE PLANNER IN PLANNING 

William E. Spangle 

American Institute of Planners 

William Spangle & Associates, Menlo Parle 

"The private planner is a professional engaged in private practice, 
providing city planning services to clients for a fee. Clients may be 
public jurisdictions, public agencies, or private individuals or business 
organizations. In practice the private planner is most frequently re- 
ferred to as a planning consultant. 

' ' The planning consultant has the same basic professional training as 
the staff planner. In addition, he should have experience in depth with 
a wide variety of community planning problems. 

"The planning consultant is normally used when the community 
cannot, because of its size or financial limitations, afford a full-time 
staff planner ; when a community requires expert advice on a special 
planning problem.; or when services are needed for other reasons to 
augment local staff. 

"In 1960 about a third of the incorporated cities in California em- 
ployed professional planning coixsultants. 'For most of these cities, the 
planning consultant provides the only staff planning service, for other 
cities the consultant directs or assists a resident planning staff on 
special studies,' according to the annual report of the State Office of 
Planning for that year.^ 

"Consultants may be involved in a wide variety of services. They 
may prepare a comprehensive general plan for a single governmental 
unit or for a group of governmental units, including all necessary 
surveys, research, plans, maps, charts, reports, and supporting data. 

' ' Consultants may also do special planning studies : preparation of 
plans for specific areas under the jurisdiction of a single unit of govern- 
ment or for special functional parts of a comprehensive plan. This 
may include overall study of urban redevelopment or preparation of 
redevelopment plans for specific projects, as well as zoning ordinances, 
subdivision regulation, and other ordinances related to planning. Fur- 
ther, they may give a planning agency advice on staff organization, 
programming for planning and for effectuation, content and scope, pro- 
cedures and/or interpretation in connection with planning studies and 
plan preparation. Other services they may perform for a planning 
agency are consulting or staff services in connection with the adminis- 
tration of a zoning ordinance, subdivision regulation, and other current 
planning matters. They may act as standby advisers, supplementing 
the less-experienced regular staff by advice and assistance in all pro- 
gram and policy matters. 

"Project planning is another type of service. Consultants may pre- 
pare preliminary studies and give advice on the community planning 
aspects of plans for specific projects ; prepare site plans for subdivisions, 
shopping centers, and other types of projects, or render advice in rela- 
tion to these. They may do site selection studies for specific private 

^California Plans, Annual Report 1959-60, State Office of Planning-, Department of 
Finance, State of California (Sacramento: December 1960), p. 6. 



346 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

or public projects, such, as library branches. Private consultants also 
give assistance in preparing cases in planning and zoning litigation, 
and serve as expert witnesses. 

"There is a wide range of service arrangements and tj'pes of plan- 
ning consultant organizations. One major category of these is personal 
consulting service plus complete technical staff, including all ordinary 
expenses in connection with the engagement, except where the contract 
provides otherwise for such expenses as local office space, printing and 
publishing reports, hearings, etc. Other types are personal consulting 
service, with general direction of technical staff provided by the client, 
and all expenses borne by the client; and personal consulting services 
only. In the latter, the exact nature of service to be performed and 
the degree of the consultant's responsibility are specified in each case 
by agreement. 

' ' There are some firms and associations which offer city and regional 
planning service only, and others which offer services in planning, 
engineering, architecture, landscape architecture, transportation eco- 
nomics, construction, and so forth, with emphasis usually on one or 
two of these professions. 

"In arranging for a consultant's services, there are three distinct 
decisions which must be made by the client. First, the client must 
determine the planning program, which sets the tyiJe and quantity of 
work. It is often desirable to engage a consultant to advise on the scope 
which is desired. Then the client must choose the consultant — this sets 
the quality of work — and decide on the fee, to set the cost of the work. 
The first step in selecting a consultant is to determine the type of pro- 
fessional services that will be needed. 

"It is important that the community first know, in a fundamental 
way, what it is asking the consultant to do. Some of the questions to 
be answered are : 

"What is the nature and scope of the project to be undertaken? 

"What is the general location, approximate size and boundaries of 
the area of concern? 

"What technical resources are needed to solve any problems antici- 
pated? 

"How much of the basic information essential to project planning is 
already available or can be assembled from local sources, such as 
maps and surveys, and how much more is needed ? 

"Will the local planning office be able to furnish some local assist- 
ance to supplement consultant services? 

"Where there is no local staff, these are the first questions on which 
the community should obtain professional advice. 

"The process of choosing a planner or an architect is not well de- 
fined; more information is needed. The Federal Housing and Home 
Finance Agency has prepared a helpful guide on this procedure for 
urban renewal, and the following suggestions have been adapted from 
tliat.2 

2 Selecting Consultants for Project Planning, Technical Guide No. 1, Urban Renewal 
Administration (Washington: 1961:). 



VOLUME 57, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 347 

"Be selective in developing a list of consultants, to contact. Don't 
make the mistake of approaching too many firms. This can prove time- 
consuming and unproductive, both for the local officials and the con- 
sultants involved. 

"In making initial contacts with the consultants, request them to 
provide general information on their qualifications and interest in 
doing the work. Give them sufficient information to decide that ques- 
tion. From their response, decide which of these firms should be given 
serious consideration. Weed out those whose qualifications are doubtful, 
for this type of work, and those unlikely to be familiar with local 
conditions and problems. 

' ' At this stage, after you have narrowed the field to a few firms, re- 
quest prospective consultants to prepare a definite proposal on the 
project to be undertaken and to provide more detailed information on 
their qualifications. From those you have chosen to consider seriously, 
ask for the following : 

1. Record of experience. Evaluate the consultant's experience in 
the light of the professional services you want to obtain. Con- 
sultants new to a particular subject may be qualified through ex- 
perience gained in related fields. Check with former clients or 
people with whom the consultant has worked ; find out about their 
dealings with the consultant, how satisfactory his performance 
was, both as to quality of work and accomplishment within the 
time established. Be sure the consultant is familiar with the ob- 
jectives and requirements of the program. The real measure of a 
consultant's performance often does not show up until a project 
has progressed well into execution, which is the proof of the plan- 
ning that went on before. This is when the benefits of good basic 
design, planning and engineering show up most clearly. It is im- 
portant to take the trouble to request information from former 
clients whose projects have advanced from the planning stage and 
are well along toward completion. 

2. Designation of members of employees of the firms who would 5e 
available for assignment to the project. You are entitled to know 
specifically what staff members will be available to work on your 
project and what their professional qualifications are. The fact 
that a firm is large and enjoys a wide reputation does not in itself 
assure that you will receive the specialized knowledge and abilities 
you need; key personnel may be assigned to other jobs. Be sure 
that qualified staff members will be available for your particular 
project. 

Size of firm, in itself, should not be a criterion in consultant 
selection. A number of smaller firms have been able to assemble 
well-rounded staffs, or may be able to provide the variety of 
services you need through association with specialists concen- 
trating on specific phases of planning. 

3. Resume of current working assignments involving personnel desig- 
nated as available for your project. Satisfy yourself that, in the 
light of other commitments and demands on the consultant 's time, 
he will be able to undertake the work promptly and aecomplish 



348 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES 

it with efficiency and dispatch. Sometimes a consultant promises 
to increase his staff if he is retained ; but such a promise may be 
impossible to keep in face of the present shortage of well-trained 
people. 

"The skill of a consultant and of his staff and the quality of his 
services can be a major factor in project success. Your choice among 
those chosen for serious consideration should be made on this basis. 

"The Housing and Home Finance Agency does not require nor 
recommend that an agency obtain professional consultant services on 
the basis of competitive bidding. Many professional societies prohibit 
their members from engaging in competitive bidding. An agency should 
be free to select its consultants on the basis of their reputation, com- 
petency, and ability to perform the desired services within a reason- 
able time schedule. 

"In summary, the consultant selected should be fully qualified in 
the following respects: he should have the experience, organization, 
and resources to perform the services satisfactorily within the required 
time, and have a reputation for competence and performance under 
ethical professional practices. The selection of any consultant must be 
demonstrably in the public interest, best for the project and for the 
community as a whole. 

"Once the agency decides that a particular firm is best qualified for 
the job, negotiations can begin on a detailed work program and on the 
fee to be charged. Careful attention to these negotiations — being sure 
that everything is covered — can preclude future misunderstandings and 
delays. Be sure you reach a clear agreement on the division of work to 
be performed by the consultant and by the agency; the manner in 
which the work is to be performed and the form and content in which 
it is to be presented; the total fee to be paid; the time limits for the 
production of work items; and the amount and method of payment 
for end products. If no agreement on the fee can be reached, then the 
firm should be notified in writing and negotiations started with the next 
firm on the agency's lists of consultants chosen for serious considera- 
tion. 

"Be prepared to work with your consultant, if you expect to receive 
the full value of his services. Give him guidance on local conditions, 
broad community objectives and specific ideas on what the project 
ought to be; but don't fence him in. He should have ample opportunity 
to improve on existing ideas or come up with some new ones. Give him 
room to exercise his professional judgment; this is what you are 
paying for. 

"The community must recognize that the administration of the plan 
is a much bigger job than its preparation and that the quality of this 
administration determines to a large extent whether the plan is effec- 
tive. 

"Planners and librarians can assist each other. Librarians can help 
planners by having materials on the local community available in the 
library. These should include fugitive materials and historical records. 
They are very important aids to planners and planning commissions, 
and often not found in libraries. 



VOLUME ^'J, NO. 3, SUMMER, 1 962 349 

''We have our own planning libraries for general materials, and we 
call on the State Library for more specialized items. 

' ' Planners can assist librarians by making sure that libraries are in- 
cluded in city master plans. Sometimes libraries are omitted because 
they are not large consumers of space, but that is an inadequate excuse. 
Libraries are important community facilities, and they must be given 
a place in the city plan if they are to give the city maximum service. ' ' 



In response to audience questions, Mr. Spangle offered further in- 
formation on federal planning funds. He explained that section 701 of 
the 1954 Housing Act makes money available for planning purposes to 
cities under 50,000 population. The local community must pay one- 
third of costs, in cash or services, and the federal government will 
contribute the other two-thirds. These grants are made through state 
planning agencies. Another provision of section 701 grants money for 
metropolitan and regional, including countywide, planning, through 
contracts made directly with the federal government. The planning 
must be comprehensive, and done by a planning agency representing 
all jurisdictions in the area. Libraries can participate only under the 
planning agencies' auspices. The problem which prevents many large 
regions and metropolitan areas from using these federal planning funds 
is that few such areas have joined together to create an area-wide plan- 
ning agency. There may be more hope for future library sj^stem 
planning under future extensions of the State's development program. 

An effectuation plan Mr. Spangle defined as the carrying-out of the 
master plan through specific building projects, zoning regulations and 
other controls, and public information activities. 

All agencies physically located in a community should be included 
in that community's master plan, no matter what the jurisdictional 
levels of the agencies — federal, state, county or district. Therefore 
county library outlets in